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Posted: 3/6/2006 10:34:11 PM EDT
i have my rifle built and it shoots really well, my question is should i leave the barrel floating or have some bed it? or is it something i can do

just wondering if it will improve accuracy?
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 10:50:25 PM EDT
That stock is made to (mostly) float the barrel.

You say it shoots well. This is a no-brainer...... don't f#ck with it.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 11:02:24 PM EDT
I agree. Like the photo though. Pain to clean up, I bet...
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 5:54:11 AM EDT
Have any pics of targets you shot w/ it? I think bedding a few inches and floating the rest would help, but it might not make much...if any difference.

Do a search over at rimfirecentral.com if you havent done so already.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 6:11:38 AM EDT
Christ! How far do you shoot that rimfire? I've seen 7MM Mags with less scope on them.

Link Posted: 3/7/2006 6:45:36 AM EDT
i bed my rifles with the volquartsen bedding kit.


i have never had a bad outcome from it.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:15:00 AM EDT
here is a my best target yet most are somewhat close to this but for some rear the its seems one or two seem to float away from POA

the scope is a 4-16x56mm side parelux adjust and illuminated MIL dot reticle
it is nice to have a scope that you can see a fly with, also with this setup you can see the bullet impact your target it is pretty neat, as far as i know there is no suck thing as over kill on optics but might be wrong

a pic of the 10 shot 60 yard group
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 4:22:26 PM EDT
You should not bed a heavy bull-barrelled Ruger 10/22 carbine like you normally bed a heavy bull-barrelled rifle (by bedding the receiver and either free-floating or bedding the heavy bull-barrel). The Ruger 10/22 aluminum-alloy receiver, when bedded, is not strong enough to support a floated, heavy, bull-barrel. Therefore, you should bed the heavy bull-barrel and float the Ruger 10/22 receiver/action.

Most aftermarket 10/22 sporter stocks have the barrel channel already routed out and ready to accept the epoxy, AND the void that houses the action is made a little larger than the 10/22 action. These two features enable you to bed the bull-barrel and free-float the action, as 10/22 experts recommend. But you must fill any gap at the rear of the receiver to transfer some of the bolt stress to the stock, or you may crack the receiver.

Get some Brownells AcraGlass (it comes in a liquid or gel; the gel is easier to work with) and follow the directions closely. Remember, you are bedding the heavy bull-barrel and not the action, so disregard all the instructions regarding preparation of the stock around the action. There should be no epoxy anywhere near the action.

Fill ALL voids and holes with modeling clay to prevent the AcraGlass gel from flowing into the receiver section. If you get the wet AcraGlass onto a part of the metal that does not have any release agent on it (or in the case of the 10/22, the AcraGlass works itself up under the receiver-barrel lug connection), then you will have an impossible time getting it all apart. Use modeling clay to make a dam in the barrel channel (in front of the lug cutout in the stock) to keep the epoxy out of the V-block recess area where the barrel is secured to the action. There is a chance of developing a mechanical lock there between the stock and the barrelled-action.

Use masking tape on the edges of the stock. Do not line the floor of the V-block recess in the stock with masking tape, because the tape would prevent the V-block from resting in its normal position. In that case, the barrel would not rest as far down as if the tape were absent, creating "play" in the barrelled-action when the action screw was fully tightened.

Use an Exacto knife to cut bedding channels in the stock. Gouge out the stock where you want the AcraGlass to be, giving the AcraGlass something to "bite" into.

For a release agent, use several coats of Johnson floor wax on all other parts. Spread the wax on, buff it to a high shine, and let it dry for 10 minutes. (As an alternative, you can use a very thin coat of non-butter-flavored Pam cooking spray, or a heavy coat of CLP on the barrel and receiver.)

After suitable application of the release agent to the barrel, receiver, and other parts, mix the Brownell's AcraGlass bedding compound (the resin and the hardener). Pour the AcraGlass into the stock and bed the barrel channel for its full length. Keep the AcraGlass away from the V-block recess area in the stock. As an alternative, you could also just build a "bump pad" for the heavy bull-barrel toward the front of the stock, but consistent pressure on the barrel is difficult to achieve.

Bed the rear portion of the stock where the gap is, but do not bed the action. It is very important to transfer some of the stress to the stock, or you could crack the receiver. Either make a "bar" across the rear of the stock by adding a "contact point" at the rear of the receiver in line with the bolt, or simply fill the gap completely (it would probably look better that way anyway).

Put the barrelled-action back into the stock and let the resin cure. Do not screw the action down fully. Tighten the screw to 1/2 turn from its maximum, and after a few hours, loosen the screw a bit and re-tighten to its original position. This leaves a bit more room for the AcraGlass to harden. The screw position will be at the maximum after the AcraGlass hardens, and on the chance the action is bottoming out elsewhere (like at the rear), this prevents a permanent stress on the action.

Before the AcraGlass has completely dried and hardened, use a plastic knife along the masking tape to trim the resin from the edges of the stock.

After allowing suitable time for the resin to cure (at least 24 hours), remove the barreled-action from the stock. Make sure the hammer is cocked and push-button safety is halfway in between safe and off; otherwise, when the barreled-action releases from the bedding material suddenly, the safety will mar the stock.

Removing the barreled-action from the stock after the epoxy has cured can be tricky. If possible, use a padded vise and try using a rubber mallet on the action screw and on the barrel itself.

Once you have removed the barreled-action from the stock, wipe the release agent from the barrel and other parts. Use 1,1,1 Trichloroethane degreaser for best results. Screw the barreled-action back together with the stock, and you're ready to go!
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 7:38:37 PM EDT
wow thanks for the help. you gave very good directions

also if i have never done this before should i let someone else do it and maybe try to watch them?

but thank you very much i totaly understand why not to bed the reciever

good job
Glockster19
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 3:35:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/9/2006 3:39:43 AM EDT by eklikwhoa]
i personally have never notice any stressing/bending of the reciever with mine and its been full free floated since i got the thing. for about a year i had the barreled reciever in a barracuda stock freefloated and notice no shift in elevation now it sits in a b&c anschutz stock full freefloated with no problems. so almost three years now without the slightest shift in elevation.

bedding can go either way, good or bad. brownells sells a kit if you wanna try it yourself with just about everything you need.


'cuda freefloated with vq kit



butler creek freefloated with washers


b&c anschutz freefloated with vq kit
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 11:33:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eklikwhoa:

b&c anschutz freefloated with vq kit
img.photobucket.com/albums/v629/eklikewhoa/ruger%20ten-twentytwo/IMG_0622.jpg



I never get tired of seeing that rifle. I have one very similiar and the Kidd trigger is going in next month. I do have a question however. Are you saying that you only used the Volquartsen aluminum bedding block and not the pressure pads that come with the kit?
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 2:19:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockster19:
wow thanks for the help. you gave very good directions

also if i have never done this before should i let someone else do it and maybe try to watch them?

but thank you very much i totaly understand why not to bed the reciever

good job
Glockster19



I'd say just go ahead and try it yourself. Just take your time, go slowly, and if you don't quite understand something, then either re-read my instructions or post a question here.

Now I need to post a picture of my own Ruger 10/22 in its McMillan M40A1 woodland camo stock (Clark 21" stainless 0.920" bull barrel), topped with a Leupold Vari-X III 3.5-10x40mm LR M3 riflescope.
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 2:31:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 00_buckshot:

Originally Posted By eklikwhoa:

b&c anschutz freefloated with vq kit
img.photobucket.com/albums/v629/eklikewhoa/ruger%20ten-twentytwo/IMG_0622.jpg



I never get tired of seeing that rifle. I have one very similiar and the Kidd trigger is going in next month. I do have a question however. Are you saying that you only used the Volquartsen aluminum bedding block and not the pressure pads that come with the kit?




i tried using the pressure pad but it didnt respond well so in the trash it went. with the kidd trigger get the captured pins along with it, makes for a good solid feel.
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