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Posted: 7/23/2003 4:12:36 PM EDT
Is this bad for it? I've heard that dry firing a rimfire is not the best course of action, but will it really hurt it? If I put a spent brass in there, will that help any?
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 6:17:59 PM EDT
Dry firing a rimfire rifle is a bad idea. It causes damage to the firing pin, I believe that most of the time it will bend it. Don't dry fire a rimfire without some sort of snap cap.
Link Posted: 7/25/2003 5:37:48 AM EDT
Another problem associated with dry firing a rimfire is it will peen the breach face. Some newer designs have travel limiters on the firing pin so the pin cannot reach the breach face. It would be wise to ere on the side of caution if you don't know if it is o.k. to dry fire your particular model.

Kent
Link Posted: 7/25/2003 6:11:07 AM EDT
typically... dry firing any weapon is a no-no.
Link Posted: 7/27/2003 7:44:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NAM:
typically... dry firing any weapon is a no-no.



Not so. Many new firearms are ok to dry-fire. Every pistol course I have been through made it very clear that dry-firing is a great way to learn your pistol. Muscle memory with the trigger. I dry fire all my centerfire guns. Never had any problems
Link Posted: 7/28/2003 12:06:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Snorkel_Bob:

Originally Posted By NAM:
typically... dry firing any weapon is a no-no.



Not so. Many new firearms are ok to dry-fire. Every pistol course I have been through made it very clear that dry-firing is a great way to learn your pistol. Muscle memory with the trigger. I dry fire all my centerfire guns. Never had any problems



Just dont dry fire your CZ-52.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 7:57:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NAM:
typically... dry firing any weapon is a no-no.



Try cleaning a Glock without dry firing it!
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 3:30:07 PM EDT
saf-T-trainer dummy ammo from dillonprecision.com , its full size, loads in mags and cycles with the bolt. I have handfulls in .22, .223, .45.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 11:23:18 PM EDT
So, since the 10/22 doesn't have a last-shot-hold-open, does this mean I need to count how many shots I fire every time in order to keep from dropping the hammer when it runs dry?
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 12:11:02 AM EDT
The first thing my father taught me about guns, was that dry firing was bad.


First thing i learned at hunter's safety, was that dry firing is bad.

Go to a gunshow, ask to look at a firearm, and dry fire it. Odds are, you'll get extremely dirty looks.

Even to this day, if i were to dry fire a weapon in front of my father, i'd get my ass chewed. And for good reason. I've seen one too many firing pins snap in my time.

If you want to dry fire, go for it. Personally, i won't be doing it without snap caps or brass in the chamber. This is the first time i've actually heard anyone suggest dry firing.
Link Posted: 8/8/2003 1:15:33 AM EDT
FishKepr, I wouldn't worry about it while out shooting, but when your sitting at home don't dry fire your 10/22 at the TV--that is what centerfire guns are for.
Link Posted: 8/11/2003 10:04:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/11/2003 10:06:31 PM EDT by Garand1911]

Originally Posted By FishKepr:
So, since the 10/22 doesn't have a last-shot-hold-open, does this mean I need to count how many shots I fire every time in order to keep from dropping the hammer when it runs dry?



buy a 22 snap cap, load it First into the mag, then 9 real bullets on top, so the last round out is a snap cap and the FP hits that instead of an empty chamber.
getting the snap cap out might be a pain though.

in a 1022 i wouldnt worry about dry firing, even if you break the FP im sure there are plenty of stock FPs laying around you could get for FREE. and buying an upgraded FP is easy to do also.
i would not dry fire a gun where replacing a FP would be difficult and expensive.
Link Posted: 8/16/2003 2:00:16 PM EDT
Guys, settle down about dry firing. Your both right, Some firearm can be dry fired and some you shouldn't.

Nam, your father is from the old school (is he in his 80's) metallurgy wasn't like it is today. And I bet his father told him not to dry fire.

I have been a certified gunsmith for 12 years and an NRA certified instructor for 15 years. I have been telling my students and customers to "Dry Fire" If a modern center fire hand gun or rifle can't take dry firing it must be made out of shit and wouldn't be safe to shoot anyway.

Most rimfire firearms shouldn't be dry fired. Bolt action rifles shouldn't be dry fired, Old firearms (80 years and older)shouldn't be dry fired and very cheep (read shitty)firearms shouldn't be dry fired. (Lorcins, Davis, Jennings, Braco Arms and New England Arms)
Link Posted: 8/16/2003 3:04:15 PM EDT
Father's 48.


He's prolly just repeating what his father told him. I bet there are a lot of firearms that can handle dry firing. I just prefer not to. Your argument definitly makes sense... i jsut prefer to use snap caps if im going to dry fire.

It's hard to break a habit. IF you dry fire your good guns, sooner or later you'll accidentally dry fire your crap gun.


Now the hard part: convincing my father that times have changed. lol....

Link Posted: 8/16/2003 10:28:14 PM EDT
I'm no expert, look at my SAT scores from 25/30 yrs. ago, but I've dryfired mt 10/22 more than I'd care to remember w/no problems (@1000dryfiresw/10/22)over the yrs.
Link Posted: 8/17/2003 8:16:43 AM EDT
What is the technical reason for not dry-firing a bolt action rifle? I have dry-fired my Savage 110 and Rem 700 at least 1k times each over the last 10 years. No problems, no bent firing pins, no deformed primer strikes- nothing.

Doing anything to excess is bad for your weapons, but I don't see a small amount of dry-firing as a big deal.

Again, I would genuinuely like to know the mechanical/technical reason that bolt actions and rimfire weapons are not ok to dry fire.
Link Posted: 8/20/2003 1:50:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/20/2003 1:53:33 PM EDT by AlphaBobRI]
I'm quoting from the Ruger 10/22 manual, page 17...

"8. With the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, push the safety to the "off" position and pull the trigger to decock it. The rifle can be "dry fired" for practice as long as it is empty and pointed in a safe direction."


So right from the horse's mouth, Ruger, you can dry-fire their 10/22!

See this URL for the manual: www.ruger.com/Firearms/PDF/18.pdf
Link Posted: 8/21/2003 7:08:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AlphaBobRI:
I'm quoting from the Ruger 10/22 manual, page 17...

"8. With the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, push the safety to the "off" position and pull the trigger to decock it. The rifle can be "dry fired" for practice as long as it is empty and pointed in a safe direction."


So right from the horse's mouth, Ruger, you can dry-fire their 10/22!

See this URL for the manual: www.ruger.com/Firearms/PDF/18.pdf



You beat me to it
Link Posted: 8/22/2003 3:34:20 PM EDT
I'll ask again, what is the technical reason for NOT dry-firing modern bolt and rimfire weapons?

It seems like the 10/22 is ok to dry fire, but now I want to know about my Savage 110 and Rem 700- what's wrong with dry firing them now? ???
Link Posted: 8/22/2003 8:09:15 PM EDT
As I understand it, sometimes a centerfire firing pin, which was designed to hit a soft primer, may be damaged by striking the sides of the opening it pokes through when it's travel isn't restricted by hitting the primer.

In rimfire, the pin frequently hits the hardened steel chamber, which may bend or distort the firing pin.

In both cases, improper hardening of the metal can cause the trouble.


Having said that, I don't own a weapon that can't be dry-fired. I suspect the restriction doesn't exist in most modern firearms (but I only know about mine).
Link Posted: 8/23/2003 6:21:33 AM EDT
Thanks for the good info, Bob. I know that the AR/M16 is fine to dry fire all day long, as is the Glock. What about the 10/22, Savage 110, and Rem 700?

I would think that shotguns would be ok to dry-fire, but now I'm wondering. (Mossberg 500?)
Link Posted: 8/23/2003 8:12:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dissipator556:
Thanks for the good info, Bob. I know that the AR/M16 is fine to dry fire all day long, as is the Glock. What about the 10/22, Savage 110, and Rem 700?

I would think that shotguns would be ok to dry-fire, but now I'm wondering. (Mossberg 500?)




Of the firearms you mention, see three or so posts up for a quote from the Ruger book that says you can dry fire for practice. Also, that's OK for the Mossberg (another weapon in my safe). I don't know about the 700 or Savage, as I don't own them (but a 700 is on my list).
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