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Posted: 2/7/2006 5:43:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:04:49 AM EDT
Good to know. I wish I knew where I could buy a metal triggar guard and safety switch for my 590.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 12:06:41 PM EDT
You can buy a metal trigger guard assembly from Mossberg, BUT it's a factory-restricted item, and MUST be installed by Mossberg.

You can buy metal safety switches from Brownell's.
There are two, the first is factory aluminum:
www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=9476&title=MOSSBERG+500+METAL+SAFETY+BUTTON

The second is an after-market, over-sized model by Hans Vang:
www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=19517&title=MOSSBERG+500%2f590+OVERSIZED+SAFETY
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 3:33:29 PM EDT
I own and shoot both Remingtons and Mossbergs.


I bought a 500 in like new condition for $149 at a local gunshop in CT. It was made in the late 80s and never fired. Still had the orange warning sticker on the side of the receiver.

The Mossberg is more economical, but won't hold up to an 870 if you're going to pound the piss out of it over ten or twenty years.

I have probably 50,000 rounds or more through my first 870 and maybe double that or more through my Remington 1100s.

No way will a Mossberg hold up after 50,000 to 100,000 rounds. It's a 5,000 round gun at best.

The military's 3,000 rd torture test was a joke. The 590 SURVIVED it. A Remington is "broken in"
at around 3,000 rds. The Late Trapshooting Hall of Famer Rudy Etchen probably shot a quarter MILLION rds or more through his 1950s vintage 870. Before Tom Knapp and his Benelli, Matt Dryke was busting 7 to 8 hand thrown clay pigeons with an 870 bang-pump - release trigger to reset sear - bang-

The Mossberg was the ONLY shotgun in it's PRICE CLASS that could survive the 3,000 rd test.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:13:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By steveinct:
I own and shoot both Remingtons and Mossbergs.


I bought a 500 in like new condition for $149 at a local gunshop in CT. It was made in the late 80s and never fired. Still had the orange warning sticker on the side of the receiver.

The Mossberg is more economical, but won't hold up to an 870 if you're going to pound the piss out of it over ten or twenty years.

I have probably 50,000 rounds or more through my first 870 and maybe double that or more through my Remington 1100s.

No way will a Mossberg hold up after 50,000 to 100,000 rounds. It's a 5,000 round gun at best.

The military's 3,000 rd torture test was a joke. The 590 SURVIVED it. A Remington is "broken in"
at around 3,000 rds. The Late Trapshooting Hall of Famer Rudy Etchen probably shot a quarter MILLION rds or more through his 1950s vintage 870. Before Tom Knapp and his Benelli, Matt Dryke was busting 7 to 8 hand thrown clay pigeons with an 870 bang-pump - release trigger to reset sear - bang-

The Mossberg was the ONLY shotgun in it's PRICE CLASS that could survive the 3,000 rd test.




Interesting
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:29:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dfariswheel:
You can buy a metal trigger guard assembly from Mossberg, BUT it's a factory-restricted item, and MUST be installed by Mossberg.

You can buy metal safety switches from Brownell's.
There are two, the first is factory aluminum:
www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=9476&title=MOSSBERG+500+METAL+SAFETY+BUTTON

The second is an after-market, over-sized model by Hans Vang:
www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=19517&title=MOSSBERG+500%2f590+OVERSIZED+SAFETY



I highly recommend the Vang safety for your mossberg.

When it comes time to remove the old one, you'll probably find it has a one way screw. For some reason Mossberg decided that was a good idea. Put the sucker in a vice and bust the plastic safety with a chisel, being careful not to scrape the receiver. It's the easiest way to get the stock plastic one off that I know of.

The Vang one comes with a replacement hex head screw.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 4:41:42 PM EDT
When I get my "tactical" shotgun, it'll have to be an 870 for only one specific reason: safety location. I can't hit the safety on a Mossberg with my thumb if I have a buttstock with "a pistol grip protruding conspicuously beneath the stock."
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:04:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 5:15:11 PM EDT by steveinct]
After about 5,000 rds or so, of continuous firing - say 100 - 200 shells per weekend over , after a few seasons of shooting things will start to rattle in a 500 - like the fire control (trigger) will start getting
jiggly and sloppy inside the receiver. The gun may continue to work, but it''ll look like hell.

The Mossberg fits its purpose: It's a great value for the average hunter, occasional recreational shooter and police who carry and swap the guns among patrols more so than shoot the living daylights out of them day in and day out. In that regard, it's impossible to beat a Mossberg for the money.

If you're going to take the gun to the range, shoot ten slugs out of it, go hunting. Put it away. Take it out a few months later for a few rounds of trap and skeet then go to the fields and shoot dozen pheasants with it and then put it away until the next three or four months - the Mossberg will prove a worthy, cost effective companion

I have two of them and don't regret it.

However, I shoot tens of thousands of shells and tear my guns down for maintenance and cleaning frequently. For that reason, I also have two 870s and two 1100s.

In that sense, the Remington is superior to the Mossberg. The same small pins and springs will wear out, but the Remington is a more durable product for receivers and bolt lug/lockup wear.

Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:15:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By steveinct:

No way will a Mossberg hold up after 50,000 to 100,000 rounds. It's a 5,000 round gun at best.


i have close to 3,000 through my 590 right now. there are no rattles, loose parts, or any other problems. it's been beat to hell, dropped, dragged around, used in bad weather, and it hasn't failed me yet. i have no doubt that it will last for more than 5,000 rounds.

now, i seriously doubt that i'll ever put 50,000 or 100,000 through it, but i am confident that it will last me a very long time.

Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:21:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chips:
i have close to 3,000 through my 590 right now. there are no rattles, loose parts, or any other problems. it's been beat to hell, dropped, dragged around, used in bad weather, and it hasn't failed me yet. i have no doubt that it will last for more than 5,000 rounds.

now, i seriously doubt that i'll ever put 50,000 or 100,000 through it, but i am confident that it will last me a very long time.



I don't get how people keep track of the ammo they put through their guns. I know what I've put through my 1911, because I'm not even done with my first case of ammo, but I could only ballpark my AR-15 in the 2500-4000rd range.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:34:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MlTCHELL:
When I get my "tactical" shotgun, it'll have to be an 870 for only one specific reason: safety location. I can't hit the safety on a Mossberg with my thumb if I have a buttstock with "a pistol grip protruding conspicuously beneath the stock."

I bought a pistol grip and ended up returning it for those reasons. I couldn't access the safety or slide release with a pistol grip. I haven't owned an 870 yet, so I can't compare, but it's in the long term plan.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:44:00 PM EDT
Good thread.

I too have both guns, and like them both. I find very little in this thread or in the article to take issue with.

The 870 is THE STANDARD. The 500 "will do to ride the river with." I doubt any of mine will ever see 5000 rounds.

Oh, one thing in the article is wrong. The 500 is NOT lighter, despite its alloy receiver. The two guns are very close in weight, so the Mossy must have thicker steel in the barrel or the mag tube or something. If you don't believe me, go on the Rem and Mossberg websites and compare the weights. Or just handle both guns--they actually feel very similar, more so than you'd think.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:52:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MlTCHELL:

Originally Posted By chips:
i have close to 3,000 through my 590 right now. there are no rattles, loose parts, or any other problems. it's been beat to hell, dropped, dragged around, used in bad weather, and it hasn't failed me yet. i have no doubt that it will last for more than 5,000 rounds.

now, i seriously doubt that i'll ever put 50,000 or 100,000 through it, but i am confident that it will last me a very long time.



I don't get how people keep track of the ammo they put through their guns. I know what I've put through my 1911, because I'm not even done with my first case of ammo, but I could only ballpark my AR-15 in the 2500-4000rd range.



Buying ammo by the case makes it easier somewhat, Im at around the 2500 round mark on my current 590, a mixture of bird/buck/slugs. 1911's are easier still as i reload .45 and keep track of components. AR's....well after 10-20000 it all gets a little fuzzy My 14.5 AR is on its 2nd barrel, first one died somewhere around the 19,000 round mark.

Aproaching 3000 rounds through a Mossberg AND I shoot a Glock, Somethings bound to blow up on me
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 7:51:27 PM EDT
It took me 17 continuous seasons of shooting from 1981 to 1998 to wreck my first Remington 1100.
at roughly 10,000 rounds per year. Some years less, some years more. At my peak shooting I would shoot as much as 32 boxes of shells per week - or about 800 rounds. 200 to 300 registered birds on Saturday and again on Sunday plus 200 to 400 shells practcing during the week on Tues & Thurs. nights.

Between 150,000 and 200,000 rounds:

The mag tube broke off of the receiver. The rails where the bolt rides get thinned out, too allowing for
sloppier internal movement and accelerated parts wear and breakage.

The barrel on that first 1100 went an additional two seasons on another receiver before finally developing a hairline crack near the locking lug recess. Fittingly the last registered score I shot with it was a 100 straight at the 2000 Eastern Zone shoot in Elysburg, PA. The barrel now sits on my living room hutch with my old photos and trophies as a relic.

Finally, the bolt from that old 1100 managed to squeeze out about another year of maybe 7,000 to under 10,000 rounds of shooting, before it too, gave up the ghost and developed a crack in the bolt body near the extractor recess.

I guess I got my $300 worth out of that first, Trap TB 1100 bought new, in 1981!
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 7:57:31 PM EDT
Bear in mind during that timeframe the replacement of small breakable parts like links, firing pin springs
and forend supports, etc. were at about a bi-weekly occurance during the summer months. High volume shooting sessions in hot summer months contributed to accelerated small parts breakage.

That would prove the same for almost any gun.

When I speak of longevity, I'm referring to the receiver/bolt/barrel "core" of the gun itself..

I will make this observation: When Remington made the earliest 1100s with the flat, milled steel
forend support (the little bushing under the barrel that forms a wedge between the underside of the barrel and the "step" in the receiver - the old fashioned milled part - NEVER EVER BROKE. Ever.

I still have ONE from a 1965 1100 and it's probably on its third receiver in 40 years!

The new ones break every couple of thousand shots
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 10:16:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MlTCHELL:

Originally Posted By chips:
i have close to 3,000 through my 590 right now. there are no rattles, loose parts, or any other problems. it's been beat to hell, dropped, dragged around, used in bad weather, and it hasn't failed me yet. i have no doubt that it will last for more than 5,000 rounds.

now, i seriously doubt that i'll ever put 50,000 or 100,000 through it, but i am confident that it will last me a very long time.



I don't get how people keep track of the ammo they put through their guns. I know what I've put through my 1911, because I'm not even done with my first case of ammo, but I could only ballpark my AR-15 in the 2500-4000rd range.



I know how many cases of ammo I shot. For instance, when I sold my Kimber I had only fired about 2,000 rounds. My LMT MRP I have put 3500 through, and another 2500 through a DPMS M4. I have a few others, but the count is fuzzier on those...
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:21:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By underdog75:

Originally Posted By MlTCHELL:

Originally Posted By chips:
i have close to 3,000 through my 590 right now. there are no rattles, loose parts, or any other problems. it's been beat to hell, dropped, dragged around, used in bad weather, and it hasn't failed me yet. i have no doubt that it will last for more than 5,000 rounds.

now, i seriously doubt that i'll ever put 50,000 or 100,000 through it, but i am confident that it will last me a very long time.



I don't get how people keep track of the ammo they put through their guns. I know what I've put through my 1911, because I'm not even done with my first case of ammo, but I could only ballpark my AR-15 in the 2500-4000rd range.



Buying ammo by the case makes it easier

pretty much. i go through shotshells by the case, so it's much easier to make an educated guess as to how many have gone through each gun...
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