Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 12/1/2005 11:26:35 AM EDT
What are the steps and tools needed for the shadetree gunsmith?

Thanks fellas.
Link Posted: 12/1/2005 12:31:41 PM EDT
If you have an extension with a clamp, remove the mag. tube clamp first.

Wear eyepro. Keep the saftey on.

Unscrew the extension or tube cap (the cap may have a spring retainer or something-I don't know for sure). It is locked in place via detent stud so no tools needed) Be sure you gave a good grasp on the cap or extension because it will want to launch off.

Slide the action open about half way (You may begin to feel a little resistance at this half-way point).

Slide the bbl. out, off the end off the mag tube.

Push in the elevator up with your fingers and you will feel spring clips on either side of the inside of the rcvr.

Push in on the spring clips (one, then the other) while moving the forend/pump handle foreward to unlock and remove the pump handle and bolt from the rcvr. Slide it up and off of the mag tube.

If you need to replace just the stock material, you'll need a special tool to unscrew the locks that hold the metal part with the arms (can't remember the name) to the wood or synthetic part.

I think most replacement handles come with a removal tool but I could be wrong. It's just a wide, flat piece of metal from what I've seen. If you need to do it often, you can buy a forend key/tool.

It should take less time than it took me to type this.
Link Posted: 12/1/2005 12:35:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cobracommand:

It should take less time than it took me to type this.



+1 and is a lot easier than he made it sound.
Link Posted: 12/1/2005 12:49:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/1/2005 12:52:13 PM EDT by niceguymr]

Originally Posted By cobracommand:
If you need to replace just the stock material, you'll need a special tool to unscrew the locks that hold the metal part with the arms (can't remember the name) to the wood or synthetic part.



To replace the forend, you will ABSOLUTELY need a special tool to do it without risk of damaging the parts or even worse, your hands. From the factory, the forend retaining nut is fastened extremely tight, so be prepared to use some brut force as well the first time you remove the retaining nut. I've heard some people suggest using a pair of needlenose pliers which would be a very bad idea. If the nut is factory tightened, you'll probably break the pliers. Secondly, if the pliers slip, you'll probably cut your hand up pretty well. Pliers are NOT the right tool for this!

Brownells sells a tool that'll do the job perfectly... And this is one of the CHEAP ones out there. I hate buying tools that are only used for one thing, but THIS is well worth the investment.
www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=17206&title=SHOTGUN+FOREND+WRENCH
Link Posted: 12/1/2005 12:53:26 PM EDT
Thanks, that was what I was wondering about. If I needed the special wrench or if there was an acceptable half ass way of doing it. Two screwdrivers a wire tie and some duct tape?
Link Posted: 12/1/2005 5:48:16 PM EDT
+1 on the NO needle nosed pliers.

One poster tried this, the pliers slipped, and he badly damaged the thin steel fore end tube.
He had to buy an entire new action bars and tube assembly.

One poster uses a large wood boring bit. He says this perfectly fits the slots in the fore end bushing, and he uses Vise-Grips to turn the bit.

You can make an acceptable "spanner" from a piece of 1/8" thick steel.

Just cut a piece long enough to span between the two slots on the nut, grip it with Vise-Grips and turn the nut off.

Also, many gun shops have a wrench.
Many will either do it for you, or loan/rent you the wrench.
Link Posted: 12/7/2005 8:06:35 AM EDT
Tag

I need to get one of those wrenches
Link Posted: 12/7/2005 9:32:48 AM EDT


I wouldn't suggest using this every day but it works for me......


Link Posted: 12/7/2005 12:35:12 PM EDT
Probably not strong enough for a REALLY tight nut, but THAT's a definite winner.

Good idea. Are we free to recommend your idea to others??
Link Posted: 12/7/2005 11:20:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/18/2005 6:31:41 AM EDT

One poster uses a large wood boring bit. He says this perfectly fits the slots in the fore end bushing, and he uses Vise-Grips to turn the bit.


I did exactly this; I purchased a 1 1/4" wood boring bit. It fits nicely into the slots.

I was ready to put the vice-grips to the bit and discovered the nut was not tight at all. Oh well, maybe it was a good thing I did this. Nothing like having the forestock nut come off at the wrong time...
Top Top