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Posted: 3/30/2006 11:03:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/30/2006 11:04:16 PM EDT by jedijayce]
C&S has an ad that says theirs is a true drop in set. Is this true, or is smithing still needed to make the pull smooth?


Brian
Link Posted: 3/30/2006 11:28:26 PM EDT
I've used two of their sets. Worked great.
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 3:07:41 AM EDT
Depends on what type of trigger your looking for. For carry there are drop in trigger kits that will give you a decent trigger. For comp use I like a lighter crisper trigger so I have to have the trigger assy worked by a GS. It is good to have a local GS that knows how to work on a 1911 for what these name brand places charge it is a rip off.
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 3:25:50 AM EDT
C&S kits are as close to true drop-in as you can find. I've used 2 sets and several other C&S parts and I have been extrememly happy. As noted above, they are almost the perfect weight for a carry gun, but not necessarily setup for a comp gun.

The only thing I had to fit with the C&S kits was the thumb safety. It would quite work with the new sear.
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 7:55:48 AM EDT
I have a Nowlin drop in hammer, sear, disconnect, sear spring and mainspring. It dropped right in to my Warrior and provided a light clean break. It is supposed to be 3.5 pounds but I have not measured it.
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 9:06:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/31/2006 9:08:15 AM EDT by cliffy109]
I dropped in a C&S set into my Operator and it really did drop in. This is the super match set with the 3.5# trigger. Its tight, but does fit and the trigger pull is right at 54 ounces.

The only thing to watch out for is your overtravel adjustment screw. I didn't check this after I installed the new set. At a match, I had the hammer follow the slide to half cock a couple of times. Backing it off cured it.
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 9:21:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mlm1219:
I have a Nowlin drop in hammer, sear, disconnect, sear spring and mainspring. It dropped right in to my Warrior and provided a light clean break. It is supposed to be 3.5 pounds but I have not measured it.



+1 for the Nowlin. I just was unaware that the sear on a Colt Gold Cup is different from every other 1911, but the Nolin was a big improvment on it right out of the box.
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 11:00:52 AM EDT
Sounds great guys.have Thank you all for the info.

Brian
Link Posted: 3/31/2006 2:33:45 PM EDT
Results can vary due to the normal manufacturing tolerances in the frame and the components.
The frame holes have a tolerance that directly affects sear-hammer engagement for depth and angle. Add to that the tolerance on the pins to the holes, and the sear and hammer to the pins and you have stacked up a lot of numbers.
It is possible for them to all ‘stack up’ in the wrong direction and cause problems.
The 1911 design is pretty good, and if the parts are in spec you should be able to assemble a working weapon. If there was a problem with a weapon you could swap a few parts and the tolerance stack would change and the weapon would likely work. This was a good improvement over the guns of the time that often required hand fitting to get them working at all.

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