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Posted: 2/24/2006 4:11:08 PM EDT
1) i've seen a gunsmith who had a jig with a magnification to allow closer inspection of the sear/hammer engagement angles, does anyone sell these, or am i going to have to make one myself?

2) are there any other sear jigs that are worth looking besides the custom power?

3) barrel bushing fitting: I'm having a hard time with the tools i have on hand to get to the surfaces on the inside as demonstrated in Book II of Kuhnhausen's page 115, particularly point #1, are there any tips or tricks to help me with this fitting?

thanks in advance.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 4:39:59 PM EDT
1.) That jig is offered at Brownells as the Brownells/Yavapai College sear jig.

2.) There are several jigs that are very good. The Power Custom jigs are great for hammer work. If you just want a sear jig, there are a couple of Marvel jigs at Brownells. I have both a Marvel sear jig and a Power Series II jig. The drawback to the Power Series II is that you need special stones, and also that there are no presets for mounting a 1911 sear.

3.) What tools do you have? To be done corectly you either need a lathe or you need an adjustable reamer to get your inside diameter correct. For the relief cuts on the inside, I have a special broach, but I usually just use a carbide cutter on a Dremel, followed by Cratex.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:14:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/24/2006 5:16:20 PM EDT by ipsilateral_7]

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
1.) That jig is offered at Brownells as the Brownells/Yavapai College sear jig.



ah-ha, I knew brownells had one,


Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
2.) There are several jigs that are very good. The Power Custom jigs are great for hammer work. If you just want a sear jig, there are a couple of Marvel jigs at Brownells. I have both a Marvel sear jig and a Power Series II jig. The drawback to the Power Series II is that you need special stones, and also that there are no presets for mounting a 1911 sear.



thank you


Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
3.) What tools do you have? To be done corectly you either need a lathe or you need an adjustable reamer to get your inside diameter correct. For the relief cuts on the inside, I have a special broach, but I usually just use a carbide cutter on a Dremel, followed by Cratex.



I actually used an automotive style stone-honer to get the id, right now it fits great, but when the barrel starts to go back into battery, it drags for lack of a better word and can keep the slide from returning into battery. at least while cycling it by hand, but it's not as smooth a motion as it should be, I have a filling that i botched this, but hey for a $10 part, it didn't hurt to try. when i took it to the range and was loading 1 round in the mag at a time, the group sizes did decrease substancially. I may end up paying someone fit it for me.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:56:22 PM EDT
Do you have a Dremel?
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:58:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
Do you have a Dremel?



d'oh, yes I do.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 6:24:55 PM EDT
If you have one of the skinny pink aluminum oxide bits, you can use it to lightly bevel the bottom front and the top rear of the ID. On the top rear, I don't mean the very rear, but instead look at the ring on the inside, and bevel the top rear of that. Do not go past 3 and 6 o'clock on either the front or rear. If you have cratex, smooth it out with that. If not, use a felt wheel and polish it for a long time with that cheesy compound that comes with a dremel. Also, do you know how to check for springing?
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 6:36:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
If you have one of the skinny pink aluminum oxide bits, you can use it to lightly bevel the bottom front and the top rear of the ID. On the top rear, I don't mean the very rear, but instead look at the ring on the inside, and bevel the top rear of that. Do not go past 3 and 6 o'clock on either the front or rear. If you have cratex, smooth it out with that. If not, use a felt wheel and polish it for a long time with that cheesy compound that comes with a dremel. Also, do you know how to check for springing?



I know how to check for springing on paper, and right now I do not believe that there is any springing. so point #1 or the middle upper of the ring that actually contacts the barrel, needs to be beveled along the full 180 degrees? that's probably my problem, I only went about 90 on recessing it.

Thanks,
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 10:33:40 PM EDT
Actually no, it does not need 180 degrees, but you can go almost that far. As for springing, take the recoil spring, guide, and plug out, and with the slide upside down, bushing in the assembled position, slide the barrel from unlocked to the locked position. If you feel any resistance, or if you push down and it feels the least bit spongy, you have springing and need more relief on your bushing.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 8:11:15 AM EDT
A quick plug for the Ed Brown sear jig: this is a simple and not too expensive jig that will allow you to put the proper angle on a sear pretty easily. On a gun in decent condition (meaning, not in need of drastic hammer work), this jig is all I've needed to achieve a good 4 to 5 lb trigger pull.
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