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Posted: 2/20/2006 6:49:09 PM EDT
Do all Mag-wells replace the MSHings? Or are there mag-wells that can attach or be attached to a 1911 without modifying/removing the existing MSH?

Or do I got it all ass backwards..
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 7:40:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/20/2006 7:41:32 PM EDT by hobbs5624]
There are mainspring housings, mainspring housings with integral magwells, bolt on magwells that do not attach to the mainspring housing, Magwells that are part of the grips, magwells that attach to the gun via machining and screws, magwells that attach to the gun via machining, magwells that are swaged, magwells that are beveled, and magwells that attach to the gun via machining and silver soldering/welding.

Magwells that are integral with the mainspring housing usually drop in and with some, the mag well can be removed. Examples of an integral magwell/MSH are Smith and Alexander and Entreprise. Examples of integral magwell/MSH where the magwell is removable are the Ed Brown and the Wilson Speed Chute. The Ed Brown has a hex head screw, making for somewhat easy removal. The Wilson is held in by the MSH pin. By far the most popular is the S&A Mag Guide. It is one piece, and has a nice finished look.

There are several brands of bolt on magwells. Most are held in place via tabs that go under the grips, which means that the grips should be relieved underneath to fit flush with the frame. Wilson makes one called the Custom Magazine Well. There was one made by Shaw, but I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy. Same goes for the one made by the John Masen Co.

Kings makes one that is part of the grips. Again, I would not recommend it.

Other options are magwells that require expensive machining, welding, soldering or swaging. These are usually the most classy, but also present some tactical drawbacks if there is no provision for pulling out a stuck mag during a class three malfunction. Examples of these are the EGW weld on mag well, Ed Brown weld on, Morris weld on, Henie weld on, Heinie bolt on, Pistol Dynamics machined on, etc. The advantage to these, besides pure classiness and looks, is that they do not add any length to the gun. All of them can be modified for a purchase on a stuck mag.

I don't know anyone who does the swaged well method anymore, but this involves heating the frame and flaring it out to shape. It requires quite a bit of skill in my opinion, and though I've owned a couple guns like this, I haven't seen it done in over 15 years.

I probably told you more than you wanted to know. There are indeed mag wells that do not replace the mainspring housing, like the Wilson, but you will probably end up having to cut the underside of the grips, which is more work than installing a S&A mag guide.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 7:46:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
There are mainspring housings, mainspring housings with integral magwells, bolt on magwells that do not attach to the mainspring housing, Magwells that are part of the grips, magwells that attach to the gun via machining and screws, magwells that attach to the gun via machining, magwells that are swaged, magwells that are beveled, and magwells that attach to the gun via machining and silver soldering/welding.

Magwells that are integral with the mainspring housing usually drop in and with some, the mag well can be removed. Examples of an integral magwell/MSH are Smith and Alexander and Entreprise. Examples of integral magwell/MSH where the magwell is removable are the Ed Brown and the Wilson Speed Chute. The Ed Brown has a hex head screw, making for somewhat easy removal. The Wilson is held in by the MSH pin. By far the most popular is the S&A Mag Guide. It is one piece, and has a nice finished look.

There are several brands of bolt on magwells. Most are held in place via tabs that go under the grips, which means that the grips should be relieved underneath to fit flush with the frame. Wilson makes one called the Custom Magazine Well. There was one made by Shaw, but I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy. Same goes for the one made by the John Masen Co.

Kings makes one that is part of the grips. Again, I would not recommend it.

Other options are magwells that require expensive machining, welding, soldering or swaging. These are usually the most classy, but also present some tactical drawbacks if there is no provision for pulling out a stuck mag during a class three malfunction. Examples of these are the EGW weld on mag well, Ed Brown weld on, Morris weld on, Henie weld on, Heinie bolt on, Pistol Dynamics machined on, etc. The advantage to these, besides pure classiness and looks, is that they do not add any length to the gun. All of them can be modified for a purchase on a stuck mag.

I don't know anyone who does the swaged well method anymore, but this involves heating the frame and flaring it out to shape. It requires quite a bit of skill in my opinion, and though I've owned a couple guns like this, I haven't seen it done in over 15 years.

I probably told you more than you wanted to know. There are indeed mag wells that do not replace the mainspring housing, like the Wilson, but you will probably end up having to cut the underside of the grips, which is more work than installing a S&A mag guide.



So, for someone in my situation, who would like to keep thier existing MSH (for 2 reasons, it has a lanyard loop and already serrated to my taste), it seems a bolt on method would be most preferred. But at the same time, I would rather not modify the grips I have either.

Looks like I might be stuck if I am not willing to give up my current MSH.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 3:21:49 AM EDT
You won't be able to get a bolt on magwell on with a lanyard loop there anyway. Changing out an MSH is easy. You might consider getting a S&A mag guide, an possibly new internals, and just swap out whenever you want. Also, S&A makes a lanyard loop mag guide.

Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:50:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
You won't be able to get a bolt on magwell on with a lanyard loop there anyway. Changing out an MSH is easy. You might consider getting a S&A mag guide, an possibly new internals, and just swap out whenever you want. Also, S&A makes a lanyard loop mag guide.




roger, im tracking now. Where are the best supplies for those magwells?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:24:52 AM EDT
www.midwaysusa.com or www.brownells.com

Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:35:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Shipwreck:
www.midwaysusa.com or www.brownells.com



brownells doesn't even have them listed...

and midway only has the wilson available..
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:41:17 AM EDT
or am I thinking to drastic? can a current MSH w/lanyard loop still work if the current magazine well is beveled?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:07:39 AM EDT
In my opinion, yes. However, I've found that practicing mag changes makes a huge difference. A mag well will make a person who never practices mag changes fairly proficient, but practicing mag changes even a little will greatly improve your ability to do fast reloads with just a mag well bevel.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:32:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
In my opinion, yes. However, I've found that practicing mag changes makes a huge difference. A mag well will make a person who never practices mag changes fairly proficient, but practicing mag changes even a little will greatly improve your ability to do fast reloads with just a mag well bevel.



I practice mag changes/tac reloads on a daily basis with my kobra carry, sometimes wishing I had a larger bevel than I have now. But its my daily "karry" gun, and a large mag well doesnt make sense for concealment or comfort.

But this new 1911 is going to be a working/class gun, and if I carry it at all it will be OWB. So with that in mind, the larger magwell will not create any issues with concealability/weight/comfort

hobbs, do you ahve any pictures of regular mag wells before and after a beveling job?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 2:35:46 PM EDT
No, unfortunately I don't have any pics. I have done them in one of two ways. I either will cut them on the mill with a 15 degree cutter, and it looks like the magwell of a factory Kimber, or I will use a large ball end mill and cut a beveled well all the way back into the mainspring housing. I have a pic of a Vic Tibbets gun that shows what that looks like. Unfortunately, the link I had to his site is dead. There are quite a few smiths who do this, but I would guess it's not cheap.

Link Posted: 2/21/2006 2:40:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hobbs5624:
No, unfortunately I don't have any pics. I have done them in one of two ways. I either will cut them on the mill with a 15 degree cutter, and it looks like the magwell of a factory Kimber, or I will use a large ball end mill and cut a beveled well all the way back into the mainspring housing. I have a pic of a Vic Tibbets gun that shows what that looks like. Unfortunately, the link I had to his site is dead. There are quite a few smiths who do this, but I would guess it's not cheap.

img238.imageshack.us/img238/9706/bq4l2vs.jpg



beauty...

i would imagine that is more time intensive then fitting a pre-fabricated magwell to an existing gun....

i could find any SA magwells/MSH on brownells, midway ? any other suggestions..?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 3:32:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 3:34:14 PM EDT by watertower]
Hobbs with great info yet again, good to see you're absence was short. One of these days I'm going to make one of my magwells look like that Tibbet's gun.

For Smith & Alexander, go direct. You'll pay the same you would through Brownells and you'll get even better service than Brownells. Here's their website:

www.smithandalexander.com/

ETA: If you don't see it on the website, call them, it looks like the website hasn't been updated in awhile.
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