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Posted: 2/13/2002 3:27:26 PM EDT
I heard lots of recommendation about dry shooting, beside the cost of ammo, why is dry shooting?. There's no recoil feeling and I though it's not good for the trigger either. Help!!.
Link Posted: 2/13/2002 3:37:05 PM EDT
Woah woah woah!

Conjugate, conjugate!


Slow down, proofread, and ask again.
Link Posted: 2/13/2002 3:55:54 PM EDT
Sorry, I should have ask What's a dry shooting first?.
Link Posted: 2/13/2002 4:07:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/13/2002 4:08:51 PM EDT
Dry shooting is pulling the trigger on an empty chamber. Some say it's OK, some say use snapcaps.
Link Posted: 2/13/2002 4:16:02 PM EDT
Additional benefits besides learning the trigger pull characteristics of a particular handgun include - learning the sight picture; becoming acquainted with the location and manipulation of all fire and operational controls; and establishing a repeatable grip or "handshake" with that firearm.
The next step is to practice dry or cold presentations; practice drawing the unloaded and triple checked firearm from what ever means of carry you use.
Link Posted: 2/14/2002 9:42:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/14/2002 9:45:13 AM EDT by slapshot]
I got this last night at Basic pistol class I'm taking. This how they said we should practice dry-firing.

Ritual Dry-fire practice
1.) Choose the proper place and time
A. You should be alone, with no distractions.

2.) Unload Firearm and remove all live ammo from practice room.

3.) Go into "Practice Mode"
A. Say aluod 3 times "this is practice, I'm going to practice now".

4.) Conduct your practice and/or maintenance.

5.) Go into "Reality Mode".
A. Say aloud 3 times "prctice is over, this is real".

6.) Return the gun to the condition that you usually keep it in.

7.) Immedately put the gun away and secure it.
A. DO NOT touch it for at least an hour.
Link Posted: 2/14/2002 3:51:10 PM EDT
Those are not bad rules, they should help you avoid a negligent discharge if you follow them.
Ever been in any of the motels near Gunsight or any other popular firearms school? Ask them how many holes have been put in their walls and how many mirrors they've had to replace due to "just one more practice shot"...BAM! Oh man, I forgot I had reloaded...
Link Posted: 2/14/2002 8:46:16 PM EDT
Slapshot, those are excellent rules to follow!! I do the exact same thing with my G19 when I practice drawing and dry firing.

On a side note, the fellas that run glockmeister.com say that dry firing a Glock without snap-caps is perfectly okay. Anyone know more about this?
Link Posted: 2/15/2002 3:46:24 AM EDT
I allways leave the ammo in my bedroom and I
dry fire only in the den .
But I still check the chamber 100 times!

Allways,Allways,Allways check the camber!!!!
Link Posted: 2/15/2002 9:46:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Beachboy:
Those are not bad rules, they should help you avoid a negligent discharge if you follow them.
Ever been in any of the motels near Gunsight or any other popular firearms school? Ask them how many holes have been put in their walls and how many mirrors they've had to replace due to "just one more practice shot"...BAM! Oh man, I forgot I had reloaded...


The instructor is also the county sheriff office firearms instuctor told us that one the their deputies did that to his house.

Also in another incident a guy forgot he reloaded and he'd do it one more time at the TV. The bullet went through the TV and killed his kid sleeping in the next room.
Link Posted: 2/15/2002 12:08:04 PM EDT
Thank-you all.
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 3:40:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 4:45:14 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 7:29:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2002 7:30:37 AM EDT by guns762]
Here's a dry firing story for you.

My neighbor, an LEO, came home from work, and as usual, pulled the magazine out of his glock, jacked the slide to remove the chambered round, and then attempted to release the pressure on the trigger spring. He did. Unfortunately, his wife had interrupted his normal schedule, by calling for him from upstairs. Instead of looking into the chamber and watching the round coming out, he looked up the stairs to his wife. The spring did indeed release, along with the the 124gr bullet. The bullet went thought his calf and ended up in his foot. You want to talk about embarrassed. He is fully recovered, except for his pride.
Link Posted: 2/17/2002 7:08:48 PM EDT
In the old days , a lot of .22's cylinders were hit by dryfiring and disfigured. Most newer guns seem to have a stop or something to limit travel of pin into rear of the chamber, just stopping short. (One Ruger MKI didnt) I dont do it anyway. I am too cheap to buy snap caps so I cut pieces or rubber tubing to match the rear of the slide. Its quieter practice too. Did you ever push forward on a 1911 type firing pin to see just how far it goes? Quite a ways, and to me, that smashes the firing pin spring, the same as dry firing without a snap cap. Whatever anyone says, I dont do that either. Thats why.
Link Posted: 2/18/2002 5:06:03 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/18/2002 5:27:56 AM EDT
Every so often I do some dry firing:
to train on unholstering and bringing on target
to train reloads
to train DA/SA transition
to get that "muscle memory" working again

From time to time I practice in front of a mirror, but not that often, because looking at my ugly mug mostly scares the living cr## out of me. ht
C-2-6
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