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Posted: 9/8/2003 8:43:42 AM EDT
I just aquired a NIB springfield 1911, one of their 'loaded' models. I took it out to shoot for the first time last night and had some severe problems with the trigger. I couldn't get it to break consistantly, I mean, one pull would be 30+ lbs, then the next would be really light, then super heavy again, in no particular order. Talk about frustrating!

I couldn't figure it out at the range, but I looked it over once I got home and realized that it had to do with where I put my finger on the trigger. If I put it on the very top of the trigger, I got a nice, crisp break with a light pull. The problem was with the lower part of the trigger... if I tried pulling the lower part I have to go near full strength to get it to break, and even then it only broke because my finger rides up the trigger when I'm struggling with it.

Anyone else ever experience this with a 1911?

Springfield has a lifetime warranty on their guns, but I hate to have to send in a weapon I just got less than a week ago. But if I must I will.

As an aside, it did open my eyes about how my grip and finger position on the weapon varies quite a bit... gotta work on a consistent grip!
Link Posted: 9/8/2003 8:55:52 AM EDT
Two things. One, have someone else shoot the gun & see if they have the same problem you did. Don't tell them what to look for, just let them shoot a couple mags.

Next, detail strip the gun & clean & oil its innards. Sounds like you may have gotten a piece of trash of some sort around the sear or maybe trigger groove?

Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/8/2003 9:15:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:
Two things. One, have someone else shoot the gun & see if they have the same problem you did. Don't tell them what to look for, just let them shoot a couple mags.

Next, detail strip the gun & clean & oil its innards. Sounds like you may have gotten a piece of trash of some sort around the sear or maybe trigger groove?

Good luck.



Hey! You're not supposed to know anything but HK!
Link Posted: 9/8/2003 9:28:44 AM EDT
Sounds like something is binding up the trigger when pressure is applied to the bottom portion of the trigger.

When your grip shifts so that your finger is to the bottom of the trigger are you sure that you are fully depressing the grip safety????
Link Posted: 9/8/2003 2:00:41 PM EDT
I had a lot of trouble with my Loaded. Mostly feeding problems. After a throat and polish, a new extractor and replacing the guide rod with a GI spring and plunger. It works ok now. At least its reliable and feeds everything. It wouldnt feed a full mag of hardball out of the box. I did replace the trigger with a short Videcky trigger and filed the SH(& out of the thumb safety as it was tearing my hands up while shooting with it. Whats up with all thsoe sharp edges?! The last two were more a personal thing as they both worked, just didnt feel right or hurt me. I didnt send it back to Sprinfield as I figured if they thought it was good to go the first time, why bother. They must not of shot it before it left or if they did, it didnt seem to bother them that it didnt work. I let my smith do the throat and polish and extractor, its their basic reliability package. It still was not 100% with the guide rod in and once it was swapped out it has been. I wish I had just got the Mil Spec I was originally looking at. Thats what I get for letting my buddy and the salesmen(also a buddy) talking me into it. This was my first and last "souped up" 1911.
Link Posted: 9/8/2003 2:44:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/8/2003 2:46:11 PM EDT by Gunbert]

Originally Posted By SGB:
Sounds like something is binding up the trigger when pressure is applied to the bottom portion of the trigger.

When your grip shifts so that your finger is to the bottom of the trigger are you sure that you are fully depressing the grip safety????




Thought of that, but it has a grip safety with the bulged end that you can't screw up if you're holding the gun with any kind of decent grip. It really seems like there is something wrong in the trigger.


To it's credit it did eat the Win Whitebox that I fed it with no problems.
Link Posted: 9/8/2003 9:26:39 PM EDT
I saw a GI 1911 that had this the trigger is fucked get new components and a decent trigger job

possible miss-ajusted overtravel screw if you have one.
Link Posted: 9/8/2003 9:28:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Gunbert:
Hey! You're not supposed to know anything but HK!




Hell, my 1911 is the ONLY gun I can detail strip other than my AR-15!
Link Posted: 9/9/2003 5:08:36 AM EDT
Hi Gunbert,
Interesting.
The Springfield "Loaded" model 1911 pistol got "Gun Tests" magazine's "Best Pistol of the Year" award back in 1999 when it was first introduced. I bought mine in 1999. So, it's an early model with the extended guide rod with the slotted end for a regular screwdriver and no integral trigger lock.
My pistol was always very reliable with factory hardball; UMC, Win. "white box', Magtech, etc., but hated handloads with a vengence. After a lot of experimenting I've got a couple of handloads that work fine now. Primarily by using the UMC Remington round as a template. I've had to become very dedicated to trimming cases and matching headstamps and creating VERY consistant ammo. But, the pistol is now reliable with all of my (14 or so at last count) 7 and 8 round, Springfield, Colt and Wilson Combat magazines.
When my pistol was new it was very tight. The slide wouldn't just slide off the receiver, you had to pull it off. Now, after about 5,000 or 6,000 rounds or so, a trip to Springfield Armory for a "reliability package" (and a lot of grief) the thing is actually a very good pistol.
In fact, it's probably my favorite pistol. One more thing, no one else makes a "standard pattern" 1911 with a brushed stainless finish and the nicely cut ( well, I like them a lot) cocking searations on the slide ( Wilson Combat's "Stainless Protector is the only other one I know of). Also, I got to agree with you about the sharp edges. It took some use to get those polished down. Lastly, this kind of story isn't that unusual for 1911 owners. You just got to love the traditional design and historic reputation of the thing to stick with some of these pistols until you finally get them to run right. Many guys simply buy an H & K. And it's hard to argue with them.
Coolio
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