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Posted: 6/2/2003 10:09:26 PM EDT
Hello folks.

Just how noisy is a .45 ACP going off compared to 9mm? I've only fired 9mms and I don't know anything about .45 ACP.

er..Better question would be - noise wise, would you rather be shooting a .45 ACP indoors without hearing protection or 9mm? (of course under those live-or-death situations - I'm not talking about the hole bullet makes here)

Link Posted: 6/2/2003 10:22:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/2/2003 10:39:03 PM EDT by BigJ491]
Not sure how much this helps, but let's just say that a .45acp is pretty friggin loud w/out hearing protection.




9mm is 114 decibils....bit of a difference...



Link Posted: 6/2/2003 11:55:10 PM EDT
I'm going to be devil's advocate here. While there's a bit of difference in sound level, I would be surprised if it's noticeable to the human, i.e. they're both damaging to the ear at the range.

Keep in mind that during a stress-related shooting, the body responds with "auditory exclusion", saving one's ears. So that way it won't matter if one is shooting a 9mm or .45acp.

I would also contend that the choice of ammo & gun will also affect the noise level a bit too.

My .o2
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 12:16:58 AM EDT
Well since .45ACP is technically sub-sonic and most 9mm loads are supersonic, 9mm would have to be the louder.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 3:48:20 AM EDT
<grin> Ever heard of "felt recoil"? How about felt "loudness?" Having purchased hearing aids a few years ago, after having gone with 50 % hearing loss for years...even rustling leaves and krinkling paper sound like cannons, and flushing the john sounds like Niagra Falls!! BUT uhhhh! unless you want hearing aids too, USE the damned ear plugs or muffs at the range!!!
Whadja SAY??!! BUT either way,it really makes asking the intruder in your bedroom a dead giveaway! <grin>

Mike
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 4:01:14 AM EDT
www.m1911.org/loudness.htm

From that website:
"Sound is measured in decibels (db), much like temperature is measured in degrees and speed in miles (or kilometers) per hour. Like most other units, the bottom of the scale or 0 db, is an arbitrary setting, which by convention is set to be the level of the sound that we can bearly hear, or our hearing threshold, as it is normally known.

One difference between the decibel scale and most of the other units we usually use in our everyday life, is the fact that the decibel scale is not linear, but logarithmic. In a linear scale, like velocity, if someone's car is moving at 100 mph, we know that he is moving at twice the speed of someone else who is doing 50 mph, i.e. 2x50 mph is double the velocity of the second car. In logarithmic scales a sound which is only 3 db higher than another, has twice the energy. For example, if you look at the table below, the 9mm Para cartridge at 160 db has twice the sound energy of the .45 ACP cartridge which is measured at 157 db.

Another complication is that the human ear does not hear linearly either. Although loudness is subjective, most people perceive one sound to be twice as loud as another, when there is a 10-fold increase in energy, or a difference of about 10 db. So a 60 db sound sounds twice as loud as a 50 db one, although there is 10 times more energy in it. Also, it is interesting to note that most people cann ot discern any difference in perceived loudness of less than 3 db. That means that the energy in the sound has to double, before someone can notice any difference."

.22 LR Rifle - 134
.45 ACP Pistol - 157
.30-06 - 159
9mm Para - 160
.357 Magnum Revolver - 164
.44 Magnum Revolver - 164
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 12:37:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:


Keep in mind that during a stress-related shooting, the body responds with "auditory exclusion", saving one's ears. So that way it won't matter if one is shooting a 9mm or .45acp.



hehe auditory exclusion or not there will still be hearing damage
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 3:38:49 PM EDT
9mm is more a crack vs. the .45 boom. They are both loud and make your ears ring. That being said 9mm hurts my ears more. It's all about velocity.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 6:18:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By M199:
9mm is more a crack vs. the .45 boom. They are both loud and make your ears ring. That being said 9mm hurts my ears more. It's all about velocity.



I will agree on the ringing after firing a 9mm. When my uncle took me to the pistol range I made the mistake of not bringing ear protection, to excited and in a rush. But after 200 rounds of 9mm coming out of a Springfield M1911 A1 and a Beretta model 8000 cougar + around 90 rounds of .22 LR out of a Ruger revolver and semi-auto your ears will be ringing for a while.

Always wear ear and eye protection when you can, that goes double when your on the pistol range.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 9:37:22 PM EDT
There are so many factors. It depends on the ammo and how the gun is configured also. If you run a gun with a short barrel, the gasses are still expanding, and at least to my ears it sounds louder. Add a compensator to the gun and it's lounder still. Often to get the most benifit out of the compensator you have to build your load with slow buring powder and push a light bullet at high FPS. A major 9 in a compensated gun has quite a crack.
Link Posted: 6/3/2003 11:22:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thesacrifice:

hehe auditory exclusion or not there will still be hearing damage



hehe, No, there won't be any damage as the body shuts down the ears. hehe
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 2:59:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Johnphin:
www.m1911.org/loudness.htm

From that website:
"Sound is measured in decibels (db), much like temperature is measured in degrees and speed in miles (or kilometers) per hour. Like most other units, the bottom of the scale or 0 db, is an arbitrary setting, which by convention is set to be the level of the sound that we can bearly hear, or our hearing threshold, as it is normally known.

One difference between the decibel scale and most of the other units we usually use in our everyday life, is the fact that the decibel scale is not linear, but logarithmic. In a linear scale, like velocity, if someone's car is moving at 100 mph, we know that he is moving at twice the speed of someone else who is doing 50 mph, i.e. 2x50 mph is double the velocity of the second car. In logarithmic scales a sound which is only 3 db higher than another, has twice the energy. For example, if you look at the table below, the 9mm Para cartridge at 160 db has twice the sound energy of the .45 ACP cartridge which is measured at 157 db.

Another complication is that the human ear does not hear linearly either. Although loudness is subjective, most people perceive one sound to be twice as loud as another, when there is a 10-fold increase in energy, or a difference of about 10 db. So a 60 db sound sounds twice as loud as a 50 db one, although there is 10 times more energy in it. Also, it is interesting to note that most people cann ot discern any difference in perceived loudness of less than 3 db. That means that the energy in the sound has to double, before someone can notice any difference."

.22 LR Rifle - 134
.45 ACP Pistol - 157
.30-06 - 159
9mm Para - 160
.357 Magnum Revolver - 164
.44 Magnum Revolver - 164



That's the chart I was looking for, Johnphin...Thanks. I knew the ones I posted weren't quite on, but close.
Link Posted: 6/4/2003 4:11:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By thesacrifice:

hehe auditory exclusion or not there will still be hearing damage



hehe, No, there won't be any damage as the body shuts down the ears. hehe



I'll see your "hehe" and raise you a "HAH!"

The point of the story is, if you can't feel pain, but someone sets your arm on fire, there's still gonna be damage, you just won't feel it.

Likewise, if you can't hear, but someone blows out your ear drums, there's still gonna be damage, you just won't feel it.

Once your feeling and/or hearing comes back, you'll probably notice the damage.
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