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Posted: 5/6/2003 5:25:34 AM EDT
I'm thinking about making a .22lr pistol my next purchase. I used to own a MK-II 5.5" blued bull barrel. I'm thinking of getting a new one in stainless. What are some opinions on this gun or about the 22/45? Are there any other pistols I should be looking at in the <$350 range?
Link Posted: 5/6/2003 5:39:53 AM EDT
I love the Mark II pistols. My wife stole my blued 5.5" bull-barrel. Now its hers and I have to ask to shoot it.

The only thing I don't like about these guns is the reassembly part. It's not that bad after you've done it a few times, but it can be difficult (and frustrating) putting the thing back together.

Then again, you shouldn't have to strip the pistol down to that point very often.

They're great shooters. They point very well and are comfortable in the hand. I've taken ours hunting on several occasions and have been please with the results.

I personally like the Hogue grips we put on ours. If I was going to buy a .22 pistol, it's be a Ruger Mark II.
Link Posted: 5/6/2003 5:45:20 AM EDT
I've had more reliable feeding pistols but not one more acurate!
Link Posted: 5/6/2003 7:47:19 AM EDT
I have fired a ton of rounds of all different makes and velocities through my MKII, and have yet to suffer a jam with it. It feeds everything from standard velocity loads to high velocity/light bullet stinger loads. It feeds the cheapest .22LR ammo I can get just fine. My Ruger 10/22 is picky about what you feed it, but my MKII gobbles up anything you can cram in it.

The super-sub-sonic rounds with the 60+ grain projectile that Aguila makes might not feed well in the gun, but I have never tried them to know for sure.
Link Posted: 5/6/2003 1:43:09 PM EDT
Thanks for the replies. Look what followed me home from the store today. I paid $329. I probably could have saved $10 if I had waited two weeks for the next Richmond, VA gun show but I'm kind of impatient.
http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/brian_hart1/vwp?.dir=/Toys&.src=ph&.dnm=Ruger+MK+II+5.5+inch+Stainless.jpg&.view=t&.done=http%3a//photos.yahoo.com/bc/brian_hart1/lst%3f%26.dir=/Toys%26.src=ph%26.view=t
Link Posted: 5/6/2003 2:15:01 PM EDT
Very nice.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 4:29:22 PM EDT
I like 'em.



All three of mine have had Clark triggers installed along with Bowen rear sights.

Pretty simple to field strip.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 4:37:38 PM EDT
I prefer the Browning Buckmark. I have shot the Ruger and I have taken it apart. Putting the Ruger back together is horrible. It is the most frustrating thing you will do with that gun. They are very accurate, I know some girls who shoot Womens sport pistol with a ruger MK-II. The size of my hands makes it very easy for me to drop the slide on the gun.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 5:12:26 PM EDT

Putting the Ruger back together is horrible.

No it's not. The big mistake people make is trying to reinstall the mainspring assembly with the hammer in the cocked position. I could do one blindfolded. Easy.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 5:45:37 PM EDT
Well once you know the trick it does make it easier to put back together. When I first took it apart it took me at least five tries to get it back together. Once I took it apaprt about three times I got quicker at it. The one I used didn't field strip as easily as my Beretta Cougar. I had to have a screwdriver to get that metal piece out.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 6:17:14 PM EDT
There is an after market kit that makes it easier to take down and reassemble the Mark II, sold on line by Ontarget. The pin that goes through the receiver is removed with an Allen wrench. I have not tried it but I am thinking seriously about it. I still have trouble with the re-assembly from time to time. I have a Mark II standard and have not yet been able to justify putting $50 of new parts in a $220 pistol. All that said, I love to shoot the Mark II and can hardly wait until mine comes back from the Ruger repair facility - the bolt somehow jammed it the receiver and would not come out.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 6:17:57 PM EDT
There is an after market kit that makes it easier to take down and reassemble the Mark II, sold on line by Ontarget. The pin that goes through the receiver is removed with an Allen wrench. I have not tried it but I am thinking seriously about it. I still have trouble with the re-assembly from time to time. I have a Mark II standard and have not yet been able to justify putting $50 of new parts in a $220 pistol. All that said, I love to shoot the Mark II and can hardly wait until mine comes back from the Ruger repair facility - the bolt somehow jammed it the receiver and would not come out.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 6:20:04 PM EDT
OOps, sorry. The website was not responding and I inadvertently posted twice.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 6:35:05 PM EDT
I have both the Buckmark and the Ruger MKII. I prefer the Ruger hands down. I fire about 800 rounds a month through my .22 pistols all summer. The Browning is not holding up; Slide stop getting loose, safety turns itself on, tabs on the slide stop and safety have come off. The Ruger with more rounds through it hasn't had an issue yet.

As far as disassembly of the Ruger goes; it's a snap once you understand how the system works. I can dissassemble and reassemble mine in under a minute.

Kent
Link Posted: 5/8/2003 4:03:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jim_Dandy:

Putting the Ruger back together is horrible.

No it's not. The big mistake people make is trying to reinstall the mainspring assembly with the hammer in the cocked position. I could do one blindfolded. Easy.




i agree

when i researched .22 pistols i read people raving about how nice the rugers are ... except stripping them

i bought one anyway, and i don't see what the big deal is. seems pretty easy to me.
Link Posted: 5/8/2003 5:24:45 PM EDT
I think the falacy that Rugers are hard to strip got started when some guy that didn't know what he was doing tried to strip his buddies once. That or there are far more mechanically incompetent people out there than I realize.

Kent
Link Posted: 5/8/2003 5:43:34 PM EDT
I agree. Read the manual! The instructions are concise. If you can't reassemble a Ruger after a few pratice runs, you have a learning disability. Please, stay away from firearms.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 4:41:57 AM EDT
I bought a MKI back in 1981 and it's still going strong. This will help with the field stripping. www.ontargetguns.com/striptip.html
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 8:23:01 AM EDT
BHart89,
I have had a Ruger MK I and a Mark II 22/45. Excellent shooter, although the 22/45 hates lead round nose bullets. After about 100 rounds they build-up on the feed ramp causes the gun to start to jam. Never had the problem with jacketed 22 ammo.

As for the field-stripping, sorry, folks, it is an adventure the first few times you do it. The 22/45 is a snap as I didn't have to do that "hold gun up overhead, jiggle, make sure hammer strut is correct place" drill.

Hands down the Ruger semi-autos are the most accurate I have ever shot. I can shoot rings around a Browning Buckmark and I don't have plastic parts in the Ruger except for the grips...
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 8:48:08 AM EDT

As for the field-stripping, sorry, folks, it is an adventure the first few times you do it.

Only if you don't pay attention. The hammer has to be dropped in order to remove the mainspring assembly (in order to release the spring tension). When the bolt is removed, the hammer is reset to the cocked position. If you try to install the mainspring assembly with the hammer reset, you are, for all intents and purposes, trying to install the mainspring assembly and place tension on it at the same time. You're SOL if you think that the mechanical force of the spring can be overcome by hand.

There are what, six or seven moving parts in a Ruger .22 Auto? How difficult can it be?
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 2:49:36 PM EDT
Well, Jim Dandy to the Rescue, if it were so simple and straight-forward, I guess there wouldn't be so many websites, aftermarket equipment, and normally the second words out of Mark II owner's mouth would not be about the joys of learning how to field strip it. The first words being how accurate it is.

And if you did yours directly on the first try, congratulations and I salute you. Honest.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 3:09:41 PM EDT

Well, Jim Dandy to the Rescue, if it were so simple and straight-forward, I guess there wouldn't be so many websites, aftermarket equipment

People buy these for the same reason they were buying solar-powered clothes dryers in the seventies. They don't know any better.

I took a college course in technical writing once. One of the big problems with instructions and technical documents is creating something that will be read and understood. Many people simply do not and will not read the instructions and many others just do not understand what they're reading.

The Ruger Auto is just an inanimate object. Don't be intimidated.
Link Posted: 5/9/2003 4:44:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By flinterfan:And if you did yours directly on the first try, congratulations and I salute you. Honest.


did mine right the first try

the instructions included were clear
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 7:55:38 AM EDT
As promised, gentlemen, I salute you both. My first efforts were, uh, not quite as successful. I finally figured it out, but it took several stabs.

Any disassembly where after making sure the gun is unloaded you whack it with a rubber mallet is a tad different...

They are excellent .22's and loads of fun to shoot.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 8:10:43 AM EDT

Any disassembly where after making sure the gun is unloaded you whack it with a rubber mallet is a tad different...

Only if you have need to remove the receiver from the grip frame.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 5:20:32 PM EDT
My first one was a Mark I in 5.5" bull barrel which I finally learned how to disassemble and assemble without problems, but it takes a couple of times. I sold the 5.5" bull for some insane reason and reget it still. I have the 50 year anniversary MKII with fixed sights and 4.75" barrel which is my current favorite plinker and a MKII target model in stainless with a 6 7/8" tapered barrel which is accurate in the extreme. The nice thing about the MKIIs is that they use the same magazines while the 22/45 takes a special magazine unique to that model.

Mine are keepers.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 6:18:29 PM EDT
Here's my experience with the Mark II Target Model, bull barrel:

1.) The pistol is plenty accurate. Eats any kind of ammo. Nice crisp trigger feel. Fun to shoot and excellent for introducing newbies to guns.

2.) During a typical range session, the rear site kept walking to the right within the dovetail. Further tightening of the set screw was futile. Finally, I dimpled the receiver with a drill to make a "home" for the set screw point.

3.) My Mark II would fail to chamber rounds after getting dirty and gritty. (100 to 150 rounds, usually.) A couple of passes with a Bore Snake and a few brushes of the extractor claw would return the pistol to reliable service. Perhaps on the Target Model the chamber is tighter?

4.) Compared to my other semi-auto pistols, it's an "involved" field-strip procedure.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 6:29:36 PM EDT

2.) During a typical range session, the rear site kept walking to the right within the dovetail. Further tightening of the set screw was futile. Finally, I dimpled the receiver with a drill to make a "home" for the set screw point.

3.) My Mark II would fail to chamber rounds after getting dirty and gritty. (100 to 150 rounds, usually.) A couple of passes with a Bore Snake and a few brushes of the extractor claw would return the pistol to reliable service. Perhaps on the Target Model the chamber is tighter?


Why didn't you send it back? Ruger has some of the best customer service of any company. I've run as much as a brick through in a single sitting and never, ever had any failures to chamber.



4.) Compared to my other semi-auto pistols, it's an "involved" field-strip procedure.

Not really. Release the tension on the mainspring assembly and remove. Doesn't get any easier than that.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 9:05:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jim_Dandy:
Why didn't you send it back?



The Bore Snake cleaning at the range is really a minor issue. I was able to fix the rear site problem in twenty minutes - it would have taken me three times that much time to box up the pistol and drive it to UPS/FedEx.

I'll only send something back if it's really fubar.
Link Posted: 5/10/2003 9:17:20 PM EDT

The Bore Snake cleaning at the range is really a minor issue. I was able to fix the rear site problem in twenty minutes - it would have taken me three times that much time to box up the pistol and drive it to UPS/FedEx.

I'll only send something back if it's really fubar.


So you really don't have any room to complain, right? I was talking to Ruger's Prescott Facility service manager awhile back and he indicated that they would pick up the charges for shipping on some of these defects- if you ask. He also gave me, FREE, several sights and bases for one of my MKIIs.
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