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Posted: 2/23/2006 6:46:40 PM EDT
i have read on different forums that a lot of people don't like a decocker gun. or prefer something Else.

now what are the advantages and disadvantages of a decocker gun to a gun with a safety?

i would assume you would carry a decocker gun loaded and decocked read for a DA trigger pull?
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 6:55:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/23/2006 6:57:40 PM EDT by ORinTX]

Originally Posted By timm667:
i have read on different forums that a lot of people don't like a decocker gun. or prefer something Else.

now what are the advantages and disadvantages of a decocker gun to a gun with a safety?

i would assume you would carry a decocker gun loaded and decocked read for a DA trigger pull?



Gah.

Where do I start?

Ok...your terminology is all wrong, so we need to straighten that out first.

By decocker gun I'm thinking you mean a DA/SA (Double Action / Single Action) pistol. That type of gun is double action for the first shot and single action thereafter. You start with the hammer down (decocked) and it cocks itself after the first shot and for subsequent shots. You eventually decock it when you're done, usually.

By safety gun, I guess you mean a single action only, like a 1911 or others. These guns won't fire when the hammer is down, you carry them cocked.

Both types of guns can have manual safeties on them.

I carry a DA/SA pistol but it has a manual safety and I carry it cocked & locked (hammer cocked, safety on.)

DA/SA pistols have different trigger pulls, so you have to adjust from DA mode to SA mode. That's why a lot of folks don't like them.

DAO (double action only) or single action pistols have the same trigger pull every time, so you have consistency.

Now that we've established this...what is your question exactly? Yes, you can carry a DA pistol decocked and ready to go, but you can also carry a cocked single action pistol ready to fire.

Some folks don't like the manual safety, as they don't want to have to screw around with something like that when their life is on the line. Other folks don't like having two different trigger pulls. Personally, I like several DA/SA pistols and I like the glock (which is technically DAO, kinda.) I think it's safest to have a consistent trigger pull every time, so for me it's glocks or some sort of C&L carry.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:10:42 PM EDT
i have a cz 40-p it does not have a manual safety, it has a decocking lever.
just wondering why it does not need a safety? i have read read people do not like this set up. just wondering why.

with the manual safety on you can not pull a trigger,gun is safe. this gun you can pull the trigger at anytime, yes it will be a DA trigger first pull but it will pull.

is this as safe as a safety on?
seems fine to me but i don't have many many year of experience with another system.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:17:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By timm667:
i have a cz 40-p it does not have a manual safety, it has a decocking lever.
just wondering why it does not need a safety? i have read read people do not like this set up. just wondering why.

with the manual safety on you can not pull a trigger,gun is safe. this gun you can pull the trigger at anytime, yes it will be a DA trigger first pull but it will pull.

is this as safe as a safety on?
seems fine to me but i don't have many many year of experience with another system.



It's safe if you don't touch the trigger, right?

That's the thing people fail to realize -- even if you have a manual safety on your gun, something is very very wrong if the trigger is being touched when you don't want the gun to fire. Look at the S&W DA revolver. It's got no manual safety. If you pull the trigger, it will fire, yet it's widely considered to be "safe." Youre CZ is no different.

The glock, while technically DAO, has a precocked striker and a relatively light trigger pull for a double action. It has no manual safety (unless you call that little doodad on the trigger a safety, which I don't.) It won't fire if you don't touch the trigger.

Have idiots managed to touch the trigger and accidentally shoot themselves? Heck, yes! But anybody who's telling you they don't think a gun without a manual safety is safe enough is really saying "I'm an idiot who might touch the trigger when I shouldn't. I don't trust myself not to fire my weapon negligently."
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:43:03 PM EDT
Take a look at the Beretta 92.

The standard model, the M9 (92FS) has a slide mounted safety/decocking switch. If you flip the switch to fire (running parallel to the direction of slide movement) you may cock the hammer manually, or it will remain cocked after the first DA shot. Pulling the switch down with a cocked hammer will de-cock the hammer safely, and the switch will remain down. This is the "safe" position, and the pistol can not be cocked. You can pull the hammer back, but the sear is not engaged, and the hammer will not stay cocked.

Then look at the 92G. It is the EXACT same model pistol, except that the safety switch is spring loaded. It is alway in the "fire" position. You can pull the switch down to the "safe" position, decocking the hammer, but the switch in the 92G is spring loaded, and will return to "fire" when it is released.

I presume if the spring in the 92G were to fail, you'd have a 92FS in your hand.

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:56:47 PM EDT
USP variants can be decoked and safety engaged. I don't follow this setup.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:58:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Graziani:
USP variants can be decoked and safety engaged. I don't follow this setup.



I'm still waiting for my v9 detent plates to arrive. Numrich sent me the wrong ones last time.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 4:38:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/24/2006 4:47:18 PM EDT by VBC]
A decocker lets you drop the hammer with a round in the barrel without causing it to shoot. Yes, you would want to carry it decocked and have it in double action mode if you have a round chambered. You don't want to drop a hammer on an auto with your fingers or thumbs. Too easy to slip and cause it to shoot.

A "safety" moves a part which either blocks the trigger from being pulled or makes it so nothing happens when you pull the trigger. So you can carry it "cocked and locked" with the hammer back ready to fire in single action (sweet trigger) on the first shot. You just have to remember to flip off the safety.

Some guns have one or the other, some have neither, and some have both and they have all kinds of different variations of each, and sometimes they're one in the same. It's personal preference which system you like best and feel safest with.

Link Posted: 2/25/2006 5:03:27 PM EDT
so seems like the real difference is personal preference. mostly on the DA trigger on first pull.
no downfall to this system. i feel comfortable with it and maybe more so then a cocked and locked gun.
i do not carry yet but planning to vary soon. just looking over the options and what and why people like what they do.
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