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Posted: 2/7/2006 8:44:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/15/2006 7:40:24 PM EDT by BSheppard]
Can someone help me out with this one? When the last round is fired and the slide locks back you slap in a new full mag and the slide won't drop. The slide release just pushes in and nothing. It is all the way down and pushed into the pistol. When I take the slide off and look at the arm that holds the slide back, there is nothing keeping it from moving into the pistol. If you push down and pull back on the slide it will release the slide. Thanks in advance for all the help.


Link Posted: 2/7/2006 8:46:42 PM EDT
Has that weapon been fired yet? It looks new.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 8:49:29 PM EDT
Yep, I have been cleaning it and trying to find the problem.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 8:51:56 PM EDT
Did it work before?

All I can think of is a bad spring/missing spring in the instance it never worked.

Maybe post at www.glocktalk.com it may be a common and easy thing to fix.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 8:57:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 8:58:01 PM EDT by Hank_Rearden1]
I have a G21. Take the receiver apart then reassemble. Could be the position of the slide catch spring.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 9:11:42 PM EDT
install trigger assembly install feed ramp, place pins for these, install slide stop, install pin. plastic to plastic metal to metal, remember this and you shall be fine
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 9:39:54 PM EDT
install trigger assembly install feed ramp, place pins for these, install slide stop, install pin. plastic to plastic metal to metal, remember this and you shall be fine

Ok, I did this and played with the little spring/wire that holds the slide open but it still not working. Can you tell me what to adjust or look for when I take it back apart?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:50:06 AM EDT
pull up on the slide stop and let go dose it snap back down?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 4:58:38 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:06:44 AM EDT
Slide release pushes down not in. Is that the problem? Some Glocks are a little harder to release the slide when new with such a small release lever.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:24:22 AM EDT
When you "slap it in" , are you manually releasing the slide, or expecting the forceful insertion of the mag to release the slide? It happens on some, but not all pistols.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 5:28:49 AM EDT
The slide release on a Glock isn't really a slide release according to Glock. You are supposed to rack the slide when you insert a fresh mag. Tap rack bang.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:39:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By g136653:
The slide release on a Glock isn't really a slide release according to Glock. You are supposed to rack the slide when you insert a fresh mag. Tap rack bang.



False, false, false. The Glock manual states that you can use either method to chamber a new round. It gives you a choice. I forget what page it's on, but I will post it when I get home.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:44:46 AM EDT
BSheppard

There are two things you can do to cure your problem. One is to shoot the hell out of your gun, breaking it in. The other is to buy and install an extended slide release. They are referred to as a slide stop in the manual and some take that to heart, and a little too literally. But saying that a slide stop doesn't have the dual function of slide stop and slide release is down right stupid.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:49:55 AM EDT
One other thing, it looks like you have oiled the entire frame of your gun, or maybe it got to you that way. I would wash it in some Dawn or other grease cutting agent and blow it out with some compressed air to get all the water out of the nooks and crannies. Even the slightest residual oil on your slide release will cause your thumb to slip off instead of actuating the lever.

Glocks require all of about 5 small drops of oil on some of the metal parts, and that's it.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:55:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
False, false, false. The Glock manual states that you can use either method to chamber a new round. It gives you a choice. I forget what page it's on, but I will post it when I get home.



+1

I can't count how many times I've heard that little piece of misinformation.

They call it the slide stop, I believe, but you can use it to drop the slide when reloading if you wish (a lot easier if you get the extended slide top, too.)
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:00:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
One other thing, it looks like you have oiled the entire frame of your gun, or maybe it got to you that way. I would wash it in some Dawn or other grease cutting agent and blow it out with some compressed air to get all the water out of the nooks and crannies. Even the slightest residual oil on your slide release will cause your thumb to slip off instead of actuating the lever.



Dawn detergent? Introduce water to the firing mechanism? Talk about downright stupid. Wow. Great advice there genius.


Glocks require all of about 5 small drops of oil on some of the metal parts, and that's it.
Glocks require no oil at all. They are meant to be operated in artic and subarctic condidtions where oil will cause malfunctions.

Maybe you ought to stick to being an expert on HK53s.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 7:13:23 AM EDT
Have you done a detail strip?

If so you may have put the slide lock spring back in the wrong place.

You have to put the top pin in first.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:26:58 AM EDT
none of my glocks slide release's release by pushing in


all of them require me to pull down on the release to disengage from the slide.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:39:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 8:43:33 AM EDT by Dusty_C]

Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
One other thing, it looks like you have oiled the entire frame of your gun, or maybe it got to you that way. I would wash it in some Dawn or other grease cutting agent and blow it out with some compressed air to get all the water out of the nooks and crannies. Even the slightest residual oil on your slide release will cause your thumb to slip off instead of actuating the lever.



Dawn detergent? Introduce water to the firing mechanism? Talk about downright stupid. Wow. Great advice there genius. People run their glocks through dishwashers all the time. At big IPSC, IDPA, and USPSA events I've seen Glock armorers tell people to do it to get sand and shit out. You should hang around and read more, and go out and learn some more before you start posting this self righteous FALSE BS.


Glocks require all of about 5 small drops of oil on some of the metal parts, and that's it.
Glocks require no oil at all. They are meant to be operated in artic and subarctic condidtions where oil will cause malfunctions.

Maybe you ought to stick to being an expert on HK53s.

Maybe you ought to shut your pie hole, the glock manual advises Either 4 or 6 spots to oil it. Geez the lunacy never stops.

ETA one more thing. Glocks were designed to work for the Austrian Army, which they do, very well. Gaston did NOT go, ok they'll only take my gun to the arctic so it has to run dry. Glocks will run dry, but it's more beneficial in the desert where the lube will collect grit and wear the internals. If the pit was still open I'd have a field day with you.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:40:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 8:41:53 AM EDT by Evil_Ed]

Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
One other thing, it looks like you have oiled the entire frame of your gun, or maybe it got to you that way. I would wash it in some Dawn or other grease cutting agent and blow it out with some compressed air to get all the water out of the nooks and crannies. Even the slightest residual oil on your slide release will cause your thumb to slip off instead of actuating the lever.



Dawn detergent? Introduce water to the firing mechanism? Talk about downright stupid. Wow. Great advice there genius.


Glocks require all of about 5 small drops of oil on some of the metal parts, and that's it.
Glocks require no oil at all. They are meant to be operated in artic and subarctic condidtions where oil will cause malfunctions.

Maybe you ought to stick to being an expert on HK53s.





There's nothing wrong with flushing it with water. How do you think guns got cleaned up to and even after WWII? Hint: two primary components were water and soap.

ETA because I was downright amazed at the water thing..

No oil? Are you daft? Ever heard of metal-on-metal wear? Lubrication to prevent spalling and galling? Do you really think militaries that do artic warfare training don't use ANY lube on their weapons? Sheesh..are you 12? Do you play airsoft? Really...
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:50:54 AM EDT
YMMV, but rather than waste my time coming here to post this topic, I'd have done called Glock for a RTA#, boxed the Glock up and sent it back to GA, to be repaired.

They do do that don'tcha know?

Mike

ps - (very well from all accounts)
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 9:52:02 AM EDT
I guess others have already pointed it out, but you are a dumbass. Even current battle skills manuals issued by the Marine Corps state that your weapons will be cleaned with soapy water if CLP is not available.

I also stated to use compressed air to get all the water out of the nooks and crannies, that includes the firing mechanism.

Glocks are not designed to be operated dry on a regular basis. They are just designed to operate that way if they have to. There is a big difference genius.

Also, genius, you need to learn how to read. It's H53 Expert. I just got out of the Marine Corps after 1 month shy of 12 years and I was highly respected in my field as a CH-53E mechanic. That's a helicopter it's built by Sikorsky, and even if Boeing built it, you would still be an ASS.




Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
One other thing, it looks like you have oiled the entire frame of your gun, or maybe it got to you that way. I would wash it in some Dawn or other grease cutting agent and blow it out with some compressed air to get all the water out of the nooks and crannies. Even the slightest residual oil on your slide release will cause your thumb to slip off instead of actuating the lever.



Dawn detergent? Introduce water to the firing mechanism? Talk about downright stupid. Wow. Great advice there genius.


Glocks require all of about 5 small drops of oil on some of the metal parts, and that's it.
Glocks require no oil at all. They are meant to be operated in artic and subarctic condidtions where oil will cause malfunctions.

Maybe you ought to stick to being an expert on HK53s.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 9:55:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By BSheppard:
Can someone help me out with this one? When the last round is fired and the slide locks back you slap in a new full mag and the slide won't drop. The slide release just pushes in and nothing. It is all the way down and pushed into the pistol. When I take the slide off and look at the arm that holds the slide back, there is nothing keeping it from moving into the pistol. If you push down and pull back on the slide it will release the slide. Thanks in advance for all the help.


FWIW:
There is a guy on here (AR15.COM) called 9mmHotRod. As new as I am at this, I have found him to be the most helpful/knowledgeble on Glock issues. Maybe he will weigh in on this. I don't know how you would contact him.
Learning
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:00:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
I just got out of the Marine Corps


That explains a lot right there. Couldn't get into a a thinking man's outfit like the Army or the Air Force, eh?

For the not too bright out there, water in your trigger mechanisim is a BAD thing.

Nobody serious trains to use the slide lock button on the Glock because it isn't a reliable method under stress. Tap rack bang. Read it, learn it, live it.

Of course my experience PALES in comparison to a grease monkey like you I am sure.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:01:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

If the pit was still open I'd have a field day with you.



The cry of the neutered.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:05:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 10:07:00 AM EDT by Dusty_C]

Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
I just got out of the Marine Corps


That explains a lot right there. Couldn't get into a a thinking man's outfit like the Army or the Air Force, eh?

For the not too bright out there, water in your trigger mechanisim is a BAD thing.

Nobody serious trains to use the slide lock button on the Glock because it isn't a reliable method under stress. Tap rack bang. Read it, learn it, live it.

Of course my experience PALES in comparison to a grease monkey like you I am sure.


Live it huh?nah, I've already got another aimed double tap off by using the slide release. I've shot USPSA, IPSC, and IDPA for years, shot with numerous swat officers from 3 different teams and dumped no less than 100,000 rounds through Glocks and never, NEVER have I see one not go into battery when the slide release was hit. The firearms instructers on those tac teams ALL taught to use the slide release, I'd say they are serious. Now open your mouth again to exchange feet.


Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

If the pit was still open I'd have a field day with you.



The cry of the neutered.



Nah, just someone that likes hanging around here watching people like you show their asses.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:08:12 AM EDT
Good for you pal. Typically paper doesn't shoot back, so if the weap fails to go into battery it is no big deal. Not a lot of "do overs" in the real world though. Tap rack bang is for pros who actually play for keeps, not for dilletantes at the range.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:09:40 AM EDT
Your amazing and stupid. You just had four or five people in a row tell you that you're stupid and you still keep going.

Once again, you used compressed air to get the water out of your gun after you are done cleaning it. The object is not to get and keep the water there. MORON.

I'm willing to bet you didn't make it into or through either one of those outfits in the first place. What were you disqualified for? Bedwetting?


Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
I just got out of the Marine Corps


That explains a lot right there. Couldn't get into a a thinking man's outfit like the Army or the Air Force, eh?

For the not too bright out there, water in your trigger mechanisim is a BAD thing.

Nobody serious trains to use the slide lock button on the Glock because it isn't a reliable method under stress. Tap rack bang. Read it, learn it, live it.

Of course my experience PALES in comparison to a grease monkey like you I am sure.


Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:11:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
One other thing, it looks like you have oiled the entire frame of your gun, or maybe it got to you that way. I would wash it in some Dawn or other grease cutting agent and blow it out with some compressed air to get all the water out of the nooks and crannies. Even the slightest residual oil on your slide release will cause your thumb to slip off instead of actuating the lever.



Dawn detergent? Introduce water to the firing mechanism? Talk about downright stupid. Wow. Great advice there genius.actually you can do that and no harm comes from it, in fact it's recommended in alot of cases


Glocks require all of about 5 small drops of oil on some of the metal parts, and that's it.
Glocks require no oil at all.wow, that's the most ignorant statment showing you know nothing about the glock firearm line They are meant to be operated in artic and subarctic condidtions where oil will cause malfunctions.

Maybe you ought to stick to being an expert on HK53s.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:13:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By g136653:
Good for you pal. Typically paper doesn't shoot back, so if the weap fails to go into battery it is no big deal. Not a lot of "do overs" in the real world though. Tap rack bang is for pros who actually play for keeps, not for dilletantes at the range.

So SWAT cops aren't pros? I'll be sure to write that one down. So what exactly makes you a pro? Mall Ninja training?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:13:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Your amazing and stupid. You just had four or five people in a row tell you that you're stupid and you still keep going.



A man who is right is a majority of one.



Once again, you used compressed air to get the water out of your gun after you are done cleaning it. The object is not to get and keep the water there. MORON.


OOOH. Let me dash off to my compressed air faucet that lets air out of the compressed air well and blow out the water that never should have been there in the first place. MORON.


I'm willing to bet you didn't make it into or through either one of those outfits in the first place. What were you disqualified for? Bedwetting?


US Army for 8 long years. Oh, and I was combat arms, not some wrench turner. I had a man's job. I understand there are plenty of women mechanics these days. I bet you traded lots of fashoin and makeup tips with them all day long.



Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:15:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
So what exactly makes you a pro? Mall Ninja training?



No, but I did spend a lot of time at the Church to begin. How about you Nancy? Ever been anywhere where there was something scarier than cardboard?
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:16:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 10:19:37 AM EDT by Dusty_C]

Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
Your amazing and stupid. You just had four or five people in a row tell you that you're stupid and you still keep going.



A man who is right is a majority of one.



Once again, you used compressed air to get the water out of your gun after you are done cleaning it. The object is not to get and keep the water there. MORON.


OOOH. Let me dash off to my compressed air faucet that lets air out of the compressed air well and blow out the water that never should have been there in the first place. MORON.


I'm willing to bet you didn't make it into or through either one of those outfits in the first place. What were you disqualified for? Bedwetting?


US Army for 8 long years. Oh, and I was combat arms, not some wrench turner. I had a man's job. I understand there are plenty of women mechanics these days. I bet you traded lots of fashoin and makeup tips with them all day long.




So you were an armorer. I've yet to meet a military armorer that new fuck all ABOUT GUNS NOT ISSUED IN THE FUCKING MILITARY.


Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
So what exactly makes you a pro? Mall Ninja training?



No, but I did spend a lot of time at the Church to begin. How about you Nancy? Ever been anywhere where there was something scarier than cardboard?



Yep, and I've got the hole in my thigh to prove it, count about 15 total holes in my ambulances over the hears and one medic 3 feet from me catching 2 in the trauma plate. Couple that with the times I've actually had to deal with armed perps and I've had my fair share of bad shit. Banger sneaking up from the crowd and pulling a gun on you and your medic and saying " I wouldn't have shot him if I didn't want him dead" kinda puts danger in perspective.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:18:14 AM EDT
Combat arms isn't an armorer. You never served. Thanks for clearing that up Mr Range Ninja.

Combat arms is Infantry, Artillery, Cav, Air Cav, and for those who like to fantasize, MPs.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:20:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By g136653:

US Army for 8 long years. Oh, and I was combat arms, not some wrench turner. I had a man's job. I understand there are plenty of women mechanics these days. I bet you traded lots of fashoin and makeup tips with them all day long.




That explains alot. When I was on recruiting duty we would trade 2 or 3 dumbasses that couldn't score a 31 on the ASVAB for one that could from the Army. Doesn't the Army(Ain't Ready to be Marines Yet) even let high school dropouts join? Sounds like you fit that catagory.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:20:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By g136653:
Combat arms isn't an armorer. You never served. Thanks for clearing that up Mr Range Ninja.

Combat arms is Infantry, Artillery, Cav, Air Cav, and for those who like to fantasize, MPs.

Yep, your a troll, plenty of MPs see real action, and I never claimed to serve. Again, your speaking about glocks and touting your military experience. Glocks have never been issued in the army. I'm sorry if your little POS beretta doesn't work right, Glocks do.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:21:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BSheppard:
Can someone help me out with this one? When the last round is fired and the slide locks back you slap in a new full mag and the slide won't drop. The slide release just pushes in and nothing. It is all the way down and pushed into the pistol. When I take the slide off and look at the arm that holds the slide back, there is nothing keeping it from moving into the pistol. If you push down and pull back on the slide it will release the slide. Thanks in advance for all the help.
i2.photobucket.com/albums/y30/bs101177/Glockpic.jpg

i2.photobucket.com/albums/y30/bs101177/GlockProb.jpg



Ok, first some of the reponses show that the nimrods giving advice didn't read what the question was.

THE F'in PISTOL RUNS WITH AMMO BEING FIRED. So the advice to clean, strip, disassemble-reassemble is just DUMB.

First, Glock don't have slide releases. They have slide stops. They are used to lock back the slide, not release it.

Second, you say you pushed the slide stop in............... Even if you use it as a slide release, you should be pushing it DOWN.

Third, the proper way to relase the slide is to use your weak hand over the top rear of the slide, pull it back forcefully, and release your grasp on the slide as it gets to the rearmost part of it's travel. AKA "sling shotting", and when you do that you don't need to fiddle with the slide stop.

Fourth, based on the descriptions of the trouble, I am guessing you are inserting an empty magazine and trying to release the slide. It don't work like that.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:23:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:

Originally Posted By BSheppard:
Can someone help me out with this one? When the last round is fired and the slide locks back you slap in a new full mag and the slide won't drop. The slide release just pushes in and nothing. It is all the way down and pushed into the pistol. When I take the slide off and look at the arm that holds the slide back, there is nothing keeping it from moving into the pistol. If you push down and pull back on the slide it will release the slide. Thanks in advance for all the help.
i2.photobucket.com/albums/y30/bs101177/Glockpic.jpg

i2.photobucket.com/albums/y30/bs101177/GlockProb.jpg



Ok, first some of the reponses show that the nimrods giving advice didn't read what the question was.

THE F'in PISTOL RUNS WITH AMMO BEING FIRED. So the advice to clean, strip, disassemble-reassemble is just DUMB.

First, Glock don't have slide releases. They have slide stops. They are used to lock back the slide, not release it.

Second, you say you pushed the slide stop in............... Even if you use it as a slide release, you should be pushing it DOWN.

Third, the proper way to relase the slide is to use your weak hand over the top rear of the slide, pull it back forcefully, and release your grasp on the slide as it gets to the rearmost part of it's travel. AKA "sling shotting", and when you do that you don't need to fiddle with the slide stop.

Fourth, based on the descriptions of the trouble, I am guessing you are inserting an empty magazine and trying to release the slide. It don't work like that.

The follower is what forced the slide stop up, Even if the mag is empty, the slide should drop when you hit the stop.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:26:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
Yep, your a troll, plenty of MPs see real action, and I never claimed to serve. Again, your speaking about glocks and touting your military experience. Glocks have never been issued in the army. I'm sorry if your little POS beretta doesn't work right, Glocks do.



I wasn't an MP, I was 11B2P. Deal with it.

Trolls like to make crap up, like you insinuating I used a Glock in the service.

MPs tend to be well out of harms way. Not that you would know, neocon.

Reality is what it is. Tap rack bang is the way to go. Don't use the slide stop unless like Dusty here you are trying to save the entire Star Trek convention from an invasion of evil black dots printed on paper.



Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:29:31 AM EDT



sorry, I just finished reading the thread. I thought the question was about a malfunctioning slide stop.

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:30:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By g136653:

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
Yep, your a troll, plenty of MPs see real action, and I never claimed to serve. Again, your speaking about glocks and touting your military experience. Glocks have never been issued in the army. I'm sorry if your little POS beretta doesn't work right, Glocks do.



I wasn't an MP, I was 11B2P. Deal with it.

Trolls like to make crap up, like you insinuating I used a Glock in the service.

MPs tend to be well out of harms way. Not that you would know, neocon.

Reality is what it is. Tap rack bang is the way to go. Don't use the slide stop unless like Dusty here you are trying to save the entire Star Trek convention from an invasion of evil black dots printed on paper.




Jesus are you incapable of processing words. I never said, or even hinted that you had a Glock in the .mil. I came right out and said you didn't after you tried to make yourself out to be a Glock expert and used your .mil experience as a back up to your flawed point. Slingshotting is a solution to a problem that does not exist. Here is a simple fact. If you have to move your weak hand that much, it's slowing you down, putting it across the front sight, means you lose your site picture, slowing you down even further. As I said before, I, or any competant shooter can get no less that one aimed double tap off in the time it takes you to slingshot after we reload and drop the slide with the slide release.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:32:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:


Third, the proper way to relase the slide is to use your weak hand over the top rear of the slide, pull it back forcefully, and release your grasp on the slide as it gets to the rearmost part of it's travel. AKA "sling shotting", and when you do that you don't need to fiddle with the slide stop.

Fourth, based on the descriptions of the trouble, I am guessing you are inserting an empty magazine and trying to release the slide. It don't work like that.



This is straight from the Glock manual(page 8 of a Glock manual), I am sure they wouldn't print the "improper" way if it truly was improper:

"4. After the last round has been fired, the slide remains open. Remove the empty magazine from
the weapon by pushing the magazine catch (19). Insert a new magazine and then either push
the slide stop lever (27) downwards (see photo), or pull the slide slightly backwards and allow it
to spring forwards. The weapon is now again secured and ready to fire."

He stated that he is having the problem after inserting the second loaded magazine.

The only problem he has, is a stiff slide stop/release lever, it works either way as a stop and a release. The gun simply needs broken in or he can install an extended slide release. Problem solved.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:33:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 10:35:49 AM EDT by kk7sm]
I am in the school of slingshotting the slide to release it. Slingshotting is a gross motor skill, which means it's easier to do under stress. Tripping a slide stop to release the slide is a fine motor skill, and thus harder to do under stress.

I agree that it is faster if you can do it, but I prefer not to depend on fine motor skills in situations where I am adrenalined up. I think the Army, when I was in, taught using the slide stop to release the slide (on 1911A1s as well as the M9 later), but subsequent training I've taken has convinced me that I prefer slingshotting.

Cheers,

kk7sm

ETA: It also makes it so I can use the exact same procedure whether I'm shooting my 1911A1, HP35, or Walther PPK/S. The Walther does not have an external slide stop. Thus, it simplifies my training to slingshot.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:36:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:

Originally Posted By OLY-M4gery:

Fourth, based on the descriptions of the trouble, I am guessing you are inserting an empty magazine and trying to release the slide. It don't work like that.



The follower is what forced the slide stop up, Even if the mag is empty, the slide should drop when you hit the stop.



Many people lack the finger/thumb strenght to operate the slide release when there is a magazine inserted, and they have to push againt the magazine spring. It is more difficult to do when a "low profile" control such as on the Glock is being used, because it's difficult to get a good grip on it while pushing forcefully.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:37:38 AM EDT
What alternate method do you use to eject your magazines under stress? You do realize that depressing the magazine release is using the exact same, fine motor skill, digit that you use to actuate the slide release right?



Originally Posted By kk7sm:
I am in the school of slingshotting the slide to release it. Slingshotting is a gross motor skill, which means it's easier to do under stress. Tripping a slide stop to release the slide is a fine motor skill, and thus harder to do under stress.

I agree that it is faster if you can do it, but I prefer not to depend on fine motor skills in situations where I am adrenalined up. I think the Army, when I was in, taught using the slide stop to release the slide (on 1911A1s as well as the M9 later), but subsequent training I've taken has convinced me that I prefer slingshotting.

Cheers,

kk7sm

Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:42:32 AM EDT
I agree that fine motor skills are harder to use under stress. Which is exactly why I have an aftermarket extended slide release and an aftermarket extended, enlarged mag release on my carry gun.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:45:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
What alternate method do you use to eject your magazines under stress? You do realize that depressing the magazine release is using the exact same, fine motor skill, digit that you use to actuate the slide release right?



It's actually not. While depressing the magazine release is technically a fine motor skill, the motion used in depressing the magazine release is not identical, nor similar, to the motion used in using the slide stop to release the slide. Releasing the magazine is a squeezing motion while tripping the slide stop is a downward motion that is going to require some degree of grip on the slide stop. I don't have to grip the magazine release because I'm not trying to manipulate it in a lateral direction.

I haven't seen a pistol made yet that has a slide release button on it. I'm sure someone will invent one now.

If tripping the slide stop works for you, do it. I'm not responsible for your training, nor what you do under stress. Neither are you responsible for mine.

I prefer to use the same techniques that work on every gun I own. Not ever gun I own has an external slide stop and even if they did, I don't really think that adding to the number of fine motor skills I have to maintain is a good thing. I'll try to keep them to a minimum. I'm not that dextrous.

Cheers,

kk7sm
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 10:54:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By kk7sm:
I haven't seen a pistol made yet that has a slide release button on it. I'm sure someone will invent one now.



The slide release on the SIG is very intuitive and easy to operate under stress.

But I agree that it's best to train to slingshot, particularly when you account for the fact that you want to be proficient with multiple pistols. In a SHTF situation you don't know what you might end up with, and you fight how you train.

I'm guilty of hitting the slide release from time to time, when I'm feeling lazy.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:14:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/8/2006 11:16:19 AM EDT by AJ-IN-JAX]

Originally Posted By g136653:


Dawn detergent? Introduce water to the firing mechanism? Talk about downright stupid. Wow. Great advice there genius.




I guess I shouldn't tell you that I clean my Glocks with Simple Green and fully submerge the slide and all the innards in a glass bread loaf pan.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 11:37:42 AM EDT
pull up on the slide stop and let go dose it snap back down?
Yes, it pops back down. Somehow there needs to be more pressure pushing out on the slide stop to work.

none of my glocks slide release's release by pushing in


all of them require me to pull down on the release to disengage from the slide.


When I try to press down on the slide release, it just pushes into the pistol. I can see how by my post you thought I was pushing it in, but what I meant was, I cannot keep it from going in while I am pushing down. On my Glock it will sink into the pistol and bottom out on the frame but will not release the slide. If you have the slide open, reach in the ejection port push out on the framestop/slide release then it will drop the slide (watch the fingers on that one though).

The oil you see on the frame is from me. It was CLP from my hands while cleaning the Glock and some other guns.

Thanks for all the advice, It seems like I will need an extended slide stop if I want it to work correctly like the Glock manual states. I don't want to send it back to glock like someone suggested becase it is IMO easier and cheaper to buy the slide stop. I have been looking for slide stops and there are so many different kinds. Which one is preferred? Again, thanks for all the help.
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