Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 1/14/2006 1:08:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/14/2006 1:09:13 PM EDT by SorryOciffer]
Looking at a stainless 44 mag for $350. These have a stronger frame than the S&W 29 don't they? The top strap looked noticably thicker, almost Ruger like in size.

S.O.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:38:00 PM EDT
my father has the stainless 8" .445 super mag, I love that thing. very smooth, exceptional quality throughout, and very very accurate.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 2:15:49 PM EDT
My Dad has a Dan Wesson .22LR stainless 6" and it is very accurate.

Link Posted: 1/14/2006 3:01:00 PM EDT
Love to shoot my .357, 6" w/ semi heavy rib.
The only thing I am not crazy about is the cylinder release location, but it is not too bad.
Very undervalued in the used market IMHO.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 3:19:40 PM EDT
Most Dan Wesson owners will tell you they love/loved these guns. Having said that, resale value on these aren't what they could/should be, IMO. The ones I've seen at gun shows and/or gun stores seem to languish for a long time on the shelves until a buyer comes along. I, for one, would never want to own one of the removeable barrel versions as I don't want to fool with setting the cylinder gap, etc.

I have not seen the more recent versions of their models.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 8:05:37 AM EDT
I have read that some years were alot better than others as they went from one owner to another. One of the 445 Supermags is calling my name... Are they even still in business? I tried a search for them, got to URls and they were both wrong....

S.O.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:39:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SorryOciffer:

Are they even still in business? I






Wesson Arms is their latest incarnation, IIRC? They're making a 1911 now as well.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:14:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:
Most Dan Wesson owners will tell you they love/loved these guns. Having said that, resale value on these aren't what they could/should be, IMO. The ones I've seen at gun shows and/or gun stores seem to languish for a long time on the shelves until a buyer comes along. I, for one, would never want to own one of the removeable barrel versions as I don't want to fool with setting the cylinder gap, etc.

I have not seen the more recent versions of their models.



I own a Monson 44. The cylinder gap spacing is ridiculously simple.

The fact that you CAN remove the bbl and change lengths is what makes the gun so accurate and appealing.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:16:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 5:17:10 PM EDT by DWFAN]

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By SorryOciffer:

Are they even still in business? I






Wesson Arms is their latest incarnation, IIRC? They're making a 1911 now as well.




Dan Wesson was purchased by CZ back in the spring. Their revolver line has been discontinued, and only 2 of their 1911's are currently being produced

CZ-DAN WESSON
edit to add link
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 3:10:32 AM EDT
My Dad owned several years back, mid/late 80s to early 90s. Including one of the interchangable barrel models. They all shot great and were pretty durable from what I remember of them. If I found one at that price, I'd buy it for sure. I've been wanting to get a nice .44 mag for a while now.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:05:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By SorryOciffer:

Are they even still in business? I






Wesson Arms is their latest incarnation, IIRC? They're making a 1911 now as well.




Dan Wesson was purchased by CZ back in the spring. Their revolver line has been discontinued, and only 2 of their 1911's are currently being produced

CZ-DAN WESSON
edit to add link



From what I have read they will slowly be re-introducing their revolver line. Hope that is true. Anyone know what serial # ranges to stay away from as I also read that depending on when they were made, some had QC issues.

S.O.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:16:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SorryOciffer:

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By SorryOciffer:

Are they even still in business? I






Wesson Arms is their latest incarnation, IIRC? They're making a 1911 now as well.




Dan Wesson was purchased by CZ back in the spring. Their revolver line has been discontinued, and only 2 of their 1911's are currently being produced

CZ-DAN WESSON
edit to add link



From what I have read they will slowly be re-introducing their revolver line. Hope that is true. Anyone know what serial # ranges to stay away from as I also read that depending on when they were made, some had QC issues.
S.O.



You are best off getting one that was made by the original company in MONSON, MA.

Most of the problems were with the second incarnation of the compnay, Wesson Arms.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 12:57:46 PM EDT
I owned one of the removable barrel models in 357. Very accurate if the cylinder gap was properly set. The tension on the barrel nut had an effect as well. It's undervalued and underappreciated. I wish I hadn't traded mine away years ago.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 2:01:11 PM EDT
For years, the Dan Wesson revolver reigned supreme on the Handgun Silhouette circuit. Unlike most pistol shooting, we’re talking about pistols that had to hit targets at 200 meters (and knock them down). Nothing could touch them until the Freedom Arms revolvers showed up. Smith & Wesson, couldn’t, Ruger couldn’t, the Colts were too wimpy…

All Dan Wessons are not created equal. You can tell a turkey really fast by closely inspecting the finishing. If it looks like a show piece and edges are finished well, it probably is. If the forcing cone is crooked and the cylinders are rough, you’re looking at a turkey. I still have the 8” heavy 44 that I used to shoot in silhouette. A couple years ago I took it out to see if it was as accurate as I remember. I shot 5 rounds into a ragged hole and one just to the left at 50 yards. No Smith and Wesson will ever do that.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 3:37:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 3gundave:

It's undervalued and underappreciated.




Not at all. Otherwise the gun would be worth more, no? I've seen them sit on the used shelf at gunstores for months until some sucker comes along. The adjustable/changeable barrel was a gimmick, IMO.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 3:38:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By billgow:

I shot 5 rounds into a ragged hole and one just to the left at 50 yards. No Smith and Wesson will ever do that.




I wouldn't advise betting against that unless you'd want to lose. I also bet your claim was with using handloads dialed into that particular gun, no?
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 4:02:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:
I wouldn't advise betting against that unless you'd want to lose. I also bet your claim was with using handloads dialed into that particular gun, no?



I bought the gun as a competition piece and I'd be delighted to use it as such again. I’ll shoot it against any revolver of equal caliber, including the Freedom Arms.

And yes, of course I load for it. I load for everything. I would expect my challenger to do likewise otherwise it would be a waste of time to show for the match in the first place.

My load is 23.5 grains of H-110 under a Sierra 240 grain JHP. The brass and primers are Winchester. This load is about 95% on 200 meter rams.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:27:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By 3gundave:

It's undervalued and underappreciated.




Not at all. Otherwise the gun would be worth more, no? I've seen them sit on the used shelf at gunstores for months until some sucker comes along. The adjustable/changeable barrel was a gimmick, IMO.



And in that assumption you would be dead wrong.

The torque of the bbl nut pushing the bbl back into the frame, as a side effect, actually made the revolvers more accurate. It was not intially meant to do that, but that is how it shook out.

The versatility of having a 2.5,4,6,8,10,12 and 15 inch bbl in .357 and 4,6,8,10,12 inch bbl in 44 Mag is unbelievably outstanding.

Dan Wessons absolutely ruled the Silhouette shootin circuit back in the day. It wasn't because thet were junk or anyone was as you put it a "sucker".

I'm glad that they are undervalued and underrated. I can't wait get a .357 Pistol Pack which includes a 2.5,4,6 and 8 inch bbl, and extra set of grips, bbl wrench for about $700 NIB NOS.

Link Posted: 1/16/2006 8:16:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/17/2006 7:49:12 AM EDT by billgow]

Originally Posted By DWFAN: I'm glad that they are undervalued and underrated. I can't wait get a .357 Pistol Pack which includes a 2.5,4,6 and 8 inch bbl, and extra set of grips, bbl wrench for about $700 NIB NOS.


I have to come clean about these revolvers. I have an exceptional shooter. It qualified for both NRA Silhouette and IHMSA Silhouette rules for a production gun. Dan Wesson made the parts but none of them came on any one gun. The one I had my best success with started life as a stainless 10” light vented configuration. Before that I’d bought two 44 cal Pistol Packs and a single 8” blued 44 from Elgin. There was a point where I swore I’d never be in the same room with a Dan Wesson, right after my first Pistol Pack. When I got hooked on the handgun silhouette thing, I had no choice but to somehow get a shooting Dan Wesson so I could get in the game. I started with two different S&Ws, a chromed 8 3/8” that almost got audible laughs when I showed up with it and then, later one of those “special edition” jobs with those idiotic adjustable front sights, that brought the house down. Eventually something very unique happened. I traded my 10” tube for a 8” heavy shroud and barrel and I started to see results (most of my trades are notoriously bad decisions on my part). Months later, again at B&B, they let me go through all their 8” 44 cal barrels. I bought two non-ported barrels that looked really good, the others had obvious defects. Over the next year I went through parts like crazy, sights, barrel nuts, springs, you name it, I went through it and DW sent me new stuff. Those guys and T/C were the most amazing people to deal with back then.. At a regional match in Ojai California a factory rep from Dan Wesson came out and tricked out guys guns between relays. Mine got a timing job and a new hand.

I think lots of things about these guns is a gimmick. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a clean Pistol Pack but the 357s look much better than the 44s. The barrel suspended in the rigid shroud and held in opposing tension is a wonder in barrel vibration dampening but I’m sure it was an accident. When the silhouette game was at it’s peak, so was Dan Wesson, since then they’ve had a really hard time.

This is what I ended up with;


Link Posted: 1/16/2006 8:35:52 PM EDT
I'll have to fess up too. I shot my DW in IHMSA back in the day (like late 70's, early 80's). From a rest with the right ammo, there wasn't much in the revolver world that would shoot with it. Accuracy could be affected by both cyl gap and barrel nut torque, ammo and a number of factors. It did take some experimentation to find out what worked well. And yes, it was a serious contender in the Production classes at IHMSA.

As for them being crap, hey, I can show you some 1911 Colts, S&W revolvers, Rugers, etc, that are crap. It all comes down to what type of service life the weapon had and how it was cared for. The few I've seen sitting at the local gun stores and at the shows were junkers.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 4:36:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

The versatility of having a 2.5,4,6,8,10,12 and 15 inch bbl in .357 and 4,6,8,10,12 inch bbl in 44 Mag is unbelievably outstanding.



Like I said, a "gimmick". How many people would ever use that many barrels, honestly?????



Dan Wessons absolutely ruled the Silhouette shootin circuit back in the day.


So? Canvas Keds used to rule the basketball court too, no? Their time has long come and gone, sir.



It wasn't because thet were junk or anyone was as you put it a "sucker".


I never said they were "junk", did I? Please do not write I said this or that when I did not, ok??? As for the "sucker", yes, when one buys a gun they can damn near never unload anywhere near what they paid for it in a timely fashion, then I would say that's a "sucker", IMO. And yes, I've been there, done that.


Link Posted: 1/17/2006 6:26:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/17/2006 6:26:54 PM EDT by DWFAN]

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

The versatility of having a 2.5,4,6,8,10,12 and 15 inch bbl in .357 and 4,6,8,10,12 inch bbl in 44 Mag is unbelievably outstanding.



Like I said, a "gimmick". How many people would ever use that many barrels, honestly?????

The point is that if you wanted to, you could. I could easily see a hunter/target shooter, wanting to be able to change bbl lengths.


Dan Wessons absolutely ruled the Silhouette shootin circuit back in the day.


So? Canvas Keds used to rule the basketball court too, no? Their time has long come and gone, sir.

The fact that they were so popular with silhouette shooters attests to the fact that they were very accurate, and at great distances for a handgun.



It wasn't because thet were junk or anyone was as you put it a "sucker".


I never said they were "junk", did I? Please do not write I said this or that when I did not, ok??? As for the "sucker", yes, when one buys a gun they can damn near never unload anywhere near what they paid for it in a timely fashion, then I would say that's a "sucker", IMO. And yes, I've been there, done that.



I never stated that you felt that they were junk. As far as the sucker part goes, that is your opinion.

Not everyone that buys a firearm buys it as an investment. Some of us buy it for the sheer enjoyment of shooting it.

I cannot see myself ever selling any of my guns, including my Dan Wesson, unless an emergency arose in which I needed cash fast.

My intent was not to start a pissing contest. I only wanted to give my opinion on the thread originators questions.


edit-spelling
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:14:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:


Dan Wessons absolutely ruled the Silhouette shootin circuit back in the day.


So? Canvas Keds used to rule the basketball court too, no? Their time has long come and gone, sir.



What's this an age restriction or something? Newer does not mean more accurate.

I'll repeat once again;

"I’ll shoot it against any revolver of equal caliber, including the Freedom Arms."
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:19:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Not everyone that buys a firearm buys it as an investment. Some of us buy it for the sheer enjoyment of shooting it.



As I do, I have never once bought a gun for an "investment".



My intent was not to start a pissing contest.


Nor have you, IMO.



I only wanted to give my opinion on the thread originators questions.


As we both have. Yours is simply wrong.


Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:19:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 3gundave:
I'll have to fess up too. I shot my DW in IHMSA back in the day



Do you know any good tricks for things like gettiing off a stuck nut?

I still have more parts for that one gun than any other I own.

I shot at LASC in Californa.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:24:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By billgow:

What's this an age restriction or something? Newer does not mean more accurate.



No age restriction, however, since they're no longer made they're not exactly widespread, no? As for newer & more accurate, I would disagree as CNC allows much tighter tolerances for a much better retail price, IMO.


I'll repeat once again; "I’ll shoot it against any revolver of equal caliber, including the Freedom Arms."


When you use commercial ammo, get back to me.

I've honestly never heard of the Freedom Arms being the benchmark of accurate handguns? Good guns, yes; but not the benchmark, IMO.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:25:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By billgow:

Do you know any good tricks for things like gettiing off a stuck nut?






Porn??????????????
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:36:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DWFAN:
The fact that they were so popular with silhouette shooters attests to the fact that they were very accurate, and at great distances for a handgun.



And the parts.

Production guns have to be 100% factory parts except for the grip, which has to be readily available (Pachmeyer was a favorite). Trigger work and sight painting is legal. Otherwise it’s an out of the box pistol.

Sights are nine tenths of the game in long range pistol shooting and the Dan Wesson had ‘em in spades and you could adjust them to any width you wanted in minutes. Repeatability was very close.

The Freedom Arms pistol didn’t beat the Dan Wesson because it was more accurate, it beat it because they sold them with a Bomar rear sight!
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:51:34 PM EDT
You youngsters are something else! All this 70's & 80's talk gives me flashbacks. I'm putting on my canvas keds, grabbin' my Dan Wesson 6" SS 357 and heading out to "shoot" some hoops.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:53:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By billgow:

What's this an age restriction or something? Newer does not mean more accurate.



No age restriction, however, since they're no longer made they're not exactly widespread, no? As for newer & more accurate, I would disagree as CNC allows much tighter tolerances for a much better retail price, IMO.



"Personally, I don't care for too many models other than the standard 92FS”

Gotcha! Ok BobCole, how about a friendly little postal match? You shoot your little Beretta 9mm and I’ll shoot my 44. Pick something small and we’ll do it postal like but post pix here. I still have a couple rounds left of my old ammo, I think.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:00:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Not everyone that buys a firearm buys it as an investment. Some of us buy it for the sheer enjoyment of shooting it.



As I do, I have never once bought a gun for an "investment".



My intent was not to start a pissing contest.


Nor have you, IMO.



I only wanted to give my opinion on the thread originators questions.


As we both have. Yours is simply wrong.





Just so I understand your opinion................

You feel that anyone who would buy a Dan Wesson revolver is a sucker because if they wanted to sell it one day, they'd be stuck with it. Yet, you have never bought a gun for it's potential re-sale value You dont see the contradicition is that?

You never said that they were junk, however, you feel because of their age, their accuracy is somewhat diminished, as compared to newer CNC mfg'd guns.

You feel my assesment of them is WRONG, because you feel that the interchangeable bbl system is a gimmick? Even though as a side effect it made the guns much more accurate?

Oh, and you have a strange fear of setting the cylinder gap spacing which is so easy that a child can do it?

Got it





Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:02:39 AM EDT
I love mine so much I parkerized it!

357 6" Revolver - One of my favorite firearms no questions asked. It's also the the most accurate handgun I own.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:17:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Hokie:
I love mine so much I parkerized it!

357 6" Revolver - One of my favorite firearms no questions asked. It's also the the most accurate handgun I own.
img.photobucket.com/albums/v734/Hokie1850/DanWesson357.jpg




Damn, that looks sweet Hokie
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 6:21:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 6:50:30 AM EDT by DWFAN]




Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:20:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 1:52:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 1:59:43 PM EDT by BobCole]

Originally Posted By billgow:

Gotcha! Ok BobCole, how about a friendly little postal match?



Nothing friendly about a match, IMO.




You shoot your little Beretta 9mm and I’ll shoot my 44. Pick something small and we’ll do it postal like but post pix here. I still have a couple rounds left of my old ammo, I think.


My Beretta isn't my target pistol of choice, I use my 92 for IDPA/IPSC, 3 Gun, etc. etc. For target I use my S&W 52.

While I have no qualms about your offer, it won't settle which gun is more accurate as it's the shooter as much as the gun, no? In addition, you're using reloads whereas I do not reload. Even the playing field & we'll talk, sir!
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 1:58:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Just so I understand your opinion................

You feel that anyone who would buy a Dan Wesson revolver is a sucker because if they wanted to sell it one day, they'd be stuck with it. Yet, you have never bought a gun for it's potential re-sale value You dont see the contradicition is that?




Not at all. My advice is for someone who perhaps doesn't know the market very well? In addition, almost all of my guns are pretty much popular models with perhaps the exception of my P7M8?



You never said that they were junk, however, you feel because of their age, their accuracy is somewhat diminished, as compared to newer CNC mfg'd guns.


Nooooooooooo, I'm saying newer guns are just as accurate, if not more so than the older models.



You feel my assesment of them is WRONG, because you feel that the interchangeable bbl system is a gimmick? Even though as a side effect it made the guns much more accurate?


Maybe it made them more accurate, maybe not. Right now that's only your contention & not proven fact, no?



Oh, and you have a strange fear of setting the cylinder gap spacing which is so easy that a child can do it?


"Fear"? Not at all, more like yet another thing to have to do to go shoot. One reason I sold off my L1A1 was the GD gas port! I hated having to keep readjusting it from ammo lot to lot.




Got it


Not yet, but I'm working on ya!





Link Posted: 1/19/2006 5:13:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/19/2006 5:23:56 PM EDT by DWFAN]

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Just so I understand your opinion................

You feel that anyone who would buy a Dan Wesson revolver is a sucker because if they wanted to sell it one day, they'd be stuck with it. Yet, you have never bought a gun for it's potential re-sale value You dont see the contradicition is that?




Not at all. My advice is for someone who perhaps doesn't know the market very well? In addition, almost all of my guns are pretty much popular models with perhaps the exception of my P7M8?



You never said that they were junk, however, you feel because of their age, their accuracy is somewhat diminished, as compared to newer CNC mfg'd guns.


Nooooooooooo, I'm saying newer guns are just as accurate, if not more so than the older models.



You feel my assesment of them is WRONG, because you feel that the interchangeable bbl system is a gimmick? Even though as a side effect it made the guns much more accurate?


Maybe it made them more accurate, maybe not. Right now that's only your contention & not proven fact, no?


Oh, and you have a strange fear of setting the cylinder gap spacing which is so easy that a child can do it?


"Fear"? Not at all, more like yet another thing to have to do to go shoot. One reason I sold off my L1A1 was the GD gas port! I hated having to keep readjusting it from ammo lot to lot.




Got it


Not yet, but I'm working on ya!




Proven fact, yes....my contention....yes. Apparently it's John Taffin's too


American Handgunner, July, 2002 by John Taffin


For big bore sixgunners, the late 1970s were the dark ages. Clint Eastwood, Dirty Harry and "Make my day!" had created such a demand for double-action .44 Magnums that Smith & Wesson was working around the clock and still unable to keep up with the demand. The fervor even spilled over to single-action .44 Magnums, so much so that we soon found Ruger Super Blackhawks in short supply. This situation would continue until both Ruger and Dan Wesson both brought out large-frame, double-action .44 Magnums.

For Ruger, the answer was the Redhawk, arriving in a robust 7.5" stainless steel version. From Dan Wesson, the engineers went to work to enlarge their .357 Magnum frame, giving us a superbly accurate, beautifully bright blued Model 44.

Earlier, silhouetters had used Dan Wesson's 8" and 10" .357

Magnum "heavy barrel" revolvers with great success. Once in a while some .357 Magnum shooters would lose a target, so it was an easy switch to the heavier, and more powerful, 8" barreled .44 Magnum.

Sixgunners very early found that even with factory grips, the .44 Magnum from Dan Wesson was about as comfortable for shooting full-house .44 Magnums as it can possibly be for a packable .44 sixgun.

The key to the accuracy of the Dan Wesson Model 44 was the same as that of the smaller framed .357 Magnum. Dan Wesson revolvers employed a barrel arid shroud that were both removable from the frame with a simple wrench so that shooters could set the cylinder gap that they desired. A locking nut at the muzzle end of the barrel securely tensioned both barrel and shroud to the frame. This had been a notable feature of Dan Wesson .357 Magnums since they had arrived in the early 1970s.
Dan Wesson sixguns, no matter what the chambering, all had a well-deserved reputation for accuracy. The small-frame guns would be made in .32 Magnum, .32-20, .22 Long Rifle, .22 Magnum, as well as the original .357 Magnum. Once the .44 Magnum was established, it would also be offered in .41 Magnum and .45 Colt, and then the frame and cylinder were both lengthened to give us the SuperMags.

Company Origins

The company bearing his name was started in 1968 by Dan Wesson, the grandson of the original Daniel Baird Wesson of Smith & Wesson. Young Dan also happened to be a longtime employee of Smith & Wesson. He went out on his own with what he felt was a better idea.

Originally, he planned to offer sixguns with interchangeable barrels and cylinders; however, he settled on simply offering shooters a choice of easily changed barrel lengths and configurations, standard weight or heavy underlugged.

Barrel changing consists of loosening the barrel nut at the end of the muzzle, removing the shroud, and unscrewing the barrel. A new barrel and shroud are replaced on the Wesson frame in reverse order. A feeler gauge, thoughtfully provided by the manufacturer, is used to set the cylinder gap, the nut is replaced and snugged up, and the Dan Wesson revolver is ready to go in a very few minutes with a new barrel length or style.

The company had many ups and downs. After Dan's untimely death, the company stayed in the Wesson family for a while, then it went to other interests, came back to the family, and finally closed its doors.

The New Wesson

In 1996, the company was purchased by Bob Serva who has invested in new, modern machinery and is now once again turning out Dan Wesson sixguns. By using new and up-to-date, state-of-the-art machinery, Serva is able to turn out the best sixguns to ever bear the Wesson Firearms name.

Cylinder chambers are smooth and the front of the cylinder and the back of the barrel are parallel to each other. Both of these items had long been problems with Dan Wesson revolvers.

In the early days of long-range silhouetting, I and many others soon found the most accurate sixgun for this then relatively new game was the Dan Wesson .357 Magnum, with many of us opting for the 8" Heavy Vent Rib version and then switching to the 10" when it became available. That extra 2" of barrel and the added sight radius was a desired bonus for the 150 meter turkeys and 200 meter rams.

The Dan Wesson revolvers were in a class by themselves when it came to long-range accuracy in the early days of silhouetting. They would rule first in .357 Magnum, then .44 Magnum, and finally in the first SuperMag, the .357. They would not be challenged until the advent of the silhouette sixguns from Freedom Arms.

Accuracy Factors

There are many factors involved in accuracy, some intrinsic to the revolver and others that are simply subjective, those that differ from shooter to shooter. We already mentioned the barrel lock-up of the Wesson revolvers as being a major reason for their accuracy. To this, we also add the cylinder lock-up as it is locked at the rear, like both Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers. Smith also locks its at the front of the ejector rod; Colt does not. Dan Wesson also locked up at the crane.

The first Smith & Wesson N-frame sixgun, the First Model Hand Ejector, or Triple-Lock of 1908, was the only Smith & Wesson revolver that featured a lock at the crane until the advent of the Performance Center revolvers.

It seems to be a given that with rifles, shorter, heavier, stiffer barrels are more intrinsically accurate than long, lightweight barrels. Does this carry over to sixguns? I would assume so. The heavy barrels on the Wessons install in my mind the thought that, "This gun was made to shoot."

Sights are always a major factor for most shooters when it comes to accuracy. Dan Wesson listened to shooters and provided easy-to-see, black front and rear sights, with the former being an undercut post available in several heights and widths.

A final ingredient in being able to get the most accuracy from any revolver, for me at least, is the grip. Dan Wesson had a radical idea when he came to the grip frame -- there isn't any! Instead, Wesson revolvers have a grip stud that accepts one-piece grips that are bolted on from the bottom.

This accomplished two things. First, Wesson was able to provide the most usable factory grips on a double-action revolver, for my particular hand and grip. Second, the stud also allowed the fitting of custom grips tailor-made to fit anyone, from those having from the smallest to the largest hands.

For my use with Dan Wesson revolvers, I have found two separate and distinct solutions. For most of my large-framed, big-bore Dan Wesson revolvers, I go with Herrett's rendition of its well-known Jordan Trooper grip. These are smooth with no finger grooves and make excellent field stocks.

However, for the medium-framed sixguns, I prefer Hogue's finger grooved stocks made of exotic woods. The .357-framed Dan Wessons with either 8" or 10" heavy underlugged barrels are extremely muzzle heavy for me, and I find the finger grooves of the Hogue stocks really help me, providing control and a feeling of security while gripping and shooting these little sixguns.

Big-Bore Confessions

I have extensively fired virtually every big-bore sixgun available. Thousands upon thousands, even tens of thousands, of .44 Magnum, heavy .45 Colt, .454 Casull, .475 Linebaugh, and .500 Linebaugh have been personally experienced and most of it has been quite enjoyable. However, there are times that the small bores are appropriate and certainly all that is needed.

There's nothing quite so relaxing as spending time with friends and family shooting .22s. But even rimfires, while very accurate and most pleasant to shoot and certainly adequate for small varmints, do not always provide as much power as is needed. To increase the range and power of sixguns without a resulting major increase in recoil leads us to one choice, namely the ,32s.

Dan Wesson was forward-thinking enough to offer the .32 Magnum in a premium quality revolver, perfect for the stand-on-your-own-two-hind-legs version of silhouetting Field Pistol. In this game, targets are much smaller than those used in long-range silhouetting with all shooting done from a standing position with the farthest target set at 100 yards. And they do look very small, especially when sighting down the barrel of a sixgun.

The .32 Magnum Dan Wesson was an early favorite for this game and was soon joined by its older brother, the .32-20, or as it is also called, the .32 Winchester Centerfire, or .32 WCF for short.

The .32-20 goes back to the 1870s and 1880s when it was first chambered in the Winchester Model 1873 lever-action rifle and then being offered in the Colt Single Action Army. By the turn of the century it was also found in the Winchester Model 1892 and the Smith & Wesson Military & Police revolver. It has always been an easy-shooting round for varmints and even larger game in a pinch.

Link Posted: 1/20/2006 1:16:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/20/2006 1:16:17 PM EDT by BobCole]

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Proven fact, yes....my contention....yes. Apparently it's John Taffin's too





While I certainly respect John Taffin, I also would like to point out were the DW's such a perfect sixgun, they would still be made & would be more popular, no????????

As it is, they only have a cult following (which is cool with me) & they're out of business more than once. This is why I do not suggest them to novice gun owners as a general rule.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:08:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/20/2006 2:10:59 PM EDT by DWFAN]

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By DWFAN:

Proven fact, yes....my contention....yes. Apparently it's John Taffin's too





While I certainly respect John Taffin, I also would like to point out were the DW's such a perfect sixgun, they would still be made & would be more popular, no????????




Just because you have a great product or a quality one does not mean that your company will be succesful.

They certainly were not perfect. Nobody said that they were.

As of spring of this year, they were still being made, and to raving reviews about their quality. People were still a little gun-shy[pun intended] about them from QC issues that were over 25 years old, and 3 owners ago.

Due to the untimely death of Dan Wesson, and a lack of capital to spend on advertising, we will never know how far the original company would have gone. Gun people are fickle in some ways, and sometimes it takes a while for something new to take hold.

Remember what everyone said about Glock? They'll melt in the car during the summer, nothing but plastic garbage.blah. blah, blah.

Or how about the .40 cal. Totally uncessary, a gimmick, BS round, it'll never take off......


As it is, they only have a cult following (which is cool with me) & they're out of business more than once. This is why I do not suggest them to novice gun owners as a general rule.

Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:09:19 PM EDT
S&W after 1000 wil need another barrel...Dan Wesson, although ugly, will last and last and last
Top Top