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Posted: 5/19/2002 11:25:30 AM EDT
I am new to handguns. Without knowing any better, I bought a Charles Daly 1911a1. I can't hit anything with it!

Yesterday at the range two guys tried to help me out. The one had a Kimber and thought the sites on mine were off and the trigger pull excessive and awful. He thought I should take it to a gunsmith.

My question is, is it worth it? Should I trade it in for something else?

The recoil from the .45 seems a bit much for me, too.

What might I expect to pay a gunsmith to adjust the sites and fix the trigger pull?

Thanks!
Link Posted: 5/19/2002 11:32:44 AM EDT
I would suggest getting rid of it. They have a reputation for small parts breakage. If you like the 1911 style weapon I would suggest that you look at Springfield, Kimber and Colt. The quality will be much better and the Springfield and Kimber lines have numerous models available.

You might also try going to the 185gr .45acp ammo. You'll notice less recoil from them. Or you may wish to step down to a .40 S&W caliber in your next handgun.

Good luck
Link Posted: 5/20/2002 7:25:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SGB:
I would suggest getting rid of it. They have a reputation for small parts breakage. If you like the 1911 style weapon I would suggest that you look at Springfield, Kimber and Colt.



Thanks for replying. I think I can master the 230 grain .45. More pushups? he
What do you think of the H&K or Glock?
Link Posted: 5/20/2002 8:03:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/20/2002 8:06:12 PM EDT by Aimless]
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 3:54:49 AM EDT
Since you are new to handguns, let me suggest something to you.

Before you go out and buy another gun, spend a little money getting instruction from a professional firearms instructor. You can either check with your local gun clubs, the police or most ranges to find one. There are also schools that you can attend. that will get you started REGARDLESS of how good or bad the Charles Daly is.

By the way, the newer ones (serial number will start with CD) are far more reliable than the older ones.
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 7:53:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By sig_230:
Before you go out and buy another gun, spend a little money getting instruction from a professional firearms instructor. You can either check with your local gun clubs, the police or most ranges to find one.



It's funny, I joined this club that was fairly expensive to join, but as far as I can tell, there is no training offered. You're right, I should take a class. I tried checking the NRA site and there wasn't anything offered at the club I joined.



By the way, the newer ones (serial number will start with CD) are far more reliable than the older ones.


Goodness, mine does start with CD. I still think something's not quite right. I bought a .22lr pistol (the club has certain operating hours for outdoors but has an indoor .22 range that is 24/7) and I can hit deadcenter at 50 yards; the rest sort of scatter. So, despite being a complete tyro, I believe it's not all my shortcomings.

Also, the fellow with the Kimber (who was hitting bullseyes at 100 yards outside) had trouble with the CD.

Finally, I in no way meant to cast aspersions on my CD. The second fellow had a Glock 17, which he let me shoot. I didn't hit dead center, but at least I was hitting the paper. I mean, I was hitting the dirt berm in front of the target with the CD!
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 8:20:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 9:21:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:
Um-how far away are you shooting?



25 yards.


Get up to within 30 feet or so and see how you do.


The range is designed such as you can only do 25 or 50 yards. I misremembered earlier when I said the guy was shooting at 100 yards. It seemed far away!


Also are you shooting off a bench, or free hand? If I was concerned that I had a problem pistol I'd be shooting off a bench and from pretty close.


I feel dumb. I was shooting freehand.

Would too much CLP cause problems? When I was trying to let the slide go forward to strip a round, it kept catching the nose of the bullet. It didn't do that the first time I tried it. The first time there was a fellow who tried to help me. I consistently hit the paper low and to the left, but I hit the paper. He thought I was flexing my arm when I pulled the trigger. This time I was everywhere but the paper.


I'd get someone who is an experience pistol shooter to let you use a gun he knows is good and kind of keep an eye on you as you shoot (of course take class etc etc eventually).


The guy with the Kimber let me shoot his. I hit the paper. He thought I was flinching and loose wristing. I tried to hold it as steady as possible.

Is there some strengthening exercise you can suggest to help me?


Thanks to everyone for replying and offering advice. I can see now how I've consistently made mistakes. I didn't take a class, I didn't research what I was buying, etc...[:\]
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 12:08:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 12:50:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:
I'll look again for that thread about hand gun shooting-there are also a bunch of books and videos that are of some help in learning the basics-I'll see if I can dig some up.



Thank you very much!

I see there is a different club that offers classes. Guess I'll look into that.

Also, I'm really only interested in putting holes in paper. I'm not anywhere near the point of considering a CCW. It's funny, because the two guys at the range had their CCW and were telling me how my CD would be too heavy to carry. I didn't have the nerve to tell them. Besides, I'm 99% sure where I work would not allow a handgun anyway. Security here doesn't even carry -- ABS batons is the worse they have!
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 1:39:25 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/21/2002 2:02:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:
For a start read this-I'd print it out also
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?id=78439



Wonderful! Thank you so much!!
Link Posted: 5/22/2002 5:19:56 PM EDT
Since you already have it......if you are inclined to basement gunsmithing.....spend a few $$$ and make some improvements......if not...or either way.....shoot the shit out of it....then trade it for something else.....I think you`re just not used to 45`s.....give it some time.....you`ll like it.......
Link Posted: 5/23/2002 9:17:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BlackandGreen:
Since you already have it......if you are inclined to basement gunsmithing.....spend a few $$$ and make some improvements......if not...or either way.....shoot the shit out of it....then trade it for something else.....I think you`re just not used to 45`s.....give it some time.....you`ll like it.......hr


Well, I replaced the ugly black plastic grips with the Chip McCormick slim rosewood grips. I did try changing the sights. That might account for my aim being off... hacko.gif I put the original back.

It looks like the barrel is getting scratched from cycling. Also, the breech face (the spot where the firing pin pops out to ignite the primer; I guess that's the breech face) is starting to look beat up. All this after around 100 rounds.

What would I replace to improve the trigger pull? My trigger pull felt like the borrowed Glock17's.

Any idea what a reasonable charge would be for a gunsmith to look at it?

I think I saw on another board someone complaining that a gunsmith refused to work on a CD.
Link Posted: 5/23/2002 6:01:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zougou:

Originally Posted By BlackandGreen:
Since you already have it......if you are inclined to basement gunsmithing.....spend a few $$$ and make some improvements......if not...or either way.....shoot the shit out of it....then trade it for something else.....I think you`re just not used to 45`s.....give it some time.....you`ll like it.......



Well, I replaced the ugly black plastic grips with the Chip McCormick slim rosewood grips. I did try changing the sights. That might account for my aim being off... I put the original back.

It looks like the barrel is getting scratched from cycling. Also, the breech face (the spot where the firing pin pops out to ignite the primer; I guess that's the breech face) is starting to look beat up. All this after around 100 rounds.

What would I replace to improve the trigger pull? My trigger pull felt like the borrowed Glock17's.

Any idea what a reasonable charge would be for a gunsmith to look at it?

I think I saw on another board someone complaining that a gunsmith refused to work on a CD.



Slow down. The marks on the barrel are normal. Don't worry about them. Don't worry about the trigger. Hang loose.

it's going to take about 500-1000 rounds for everything to work in. Don't go putting a bunch of money in that will simply be undone as the pistol breaks in.
Link Posted: 5/23/2002 8:14:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sig_230:
[Slow down. The marks on the barrel are normal. Don't worry about them. Don't worry about the trigger. Hang loose.
it's going to take about 500-1000 rounds for everything to work in.



Thank you! Is CLP good enough for the slide?

Wow, this thread has come full circle.
Link Posted: 5/24/2002 4:08:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By zougou:

Originally Posted By sig_230:
[Slow down. The marks on the barrel are normal. Don't worry about them. Don't worry about the trigger. Hang loose.
it's going to take about 500-1000 rounds for everything to work in.



Thank you! Is CLP good enough for the slide?

Wow, this thread has come full circle.

And if you think too much.....you may never get there......do what aimless says....."practice".................
Link Posted: 5/24/2002 4:12:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By zougou:

Originally Posted By sig_230:
[Slow down. The marks on the barrel are normal. Don't worry about them. Don't worry about the trigger. Hang loose.
it's going to take about 500-1000 rounds for everything to work in.



Thank you! Is CLP good enough for the slide?

Wow, this thread has come full circle.



Sure, use any good lube. CLP will Clean Lube and Protect. But so will many others. Ballistol and Miltek will have there cheerleaders too. One that I like, mainly because it works well at high temperatures and will stay on your gun forever, is plain old Mobile 1. You can buy a lifetime supply (a quart) or stop by your local Jiffy Lube and see if they have a few empty bottles. There will be enough left to do hundreds of guns.
Link Posted: 5/24/2002 8:31:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/24/2002 8:37:12 PM EDT by zougou]

And if you think too much.....you may never get there......do what aimless says....."practice".................hr


Yeah, but, Aimless also said to get a G30. I'm torn. Practice makes permanent. You want I should keep shooting the berm? Is it normal for the barrel to rattle around when the slide is locked back?
Link Posted: 5/25/2002 6:29:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By zougou:

And if you think too much.....you may never get there......do what aimless says....."practice".................


Yeah, but, Aimless also said to get a G30. I'm torn. Practice makes permanent. You want I should keep shooting the berm?

Is it normal for the barrel to rattle around when the slide is locked back?



Yup. On a 1911 type pistol you'll see just that. But when the pistol is in battery the barrel should be locked firmly to the frame.

That is typical of any Browning type tilt designs so don't worry about it.
Link Posted: 5/25/2002 12:23:19 PM EDT
Remember this about 1911`s.......Uncle would not have issued them....."en masse"....for about 80 some years....if they were`nt good.........they would`nt be the MOST COPIED handgun type in the world...if they were`nt good..........to each his own...but people who flame 1911`s give weak arguments.......
Link Posted: 5/25/2002 5:08:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BlackandGreen:
..........to each his own...but people who flame 1911`s give weak arguments.......hr


Gosh, I wasn't flaming the 1911a1! h.gifh.gifh.gif
I'm sorry to have given you that impression. I like them, that's why I bought the CD in the first place! I was just wondering at what point I give up if all I hit is the berm.

I respect everyone's opinion on this board; that's why I ask.

Thanks
Link Posted: 5/26/2002 6:03:07 AM EDT
Buddy.....you misunderstand.....I was`nt talking about you........anyway...the cd`s Ive looked at did`nt seem that bad.....of course..the proof is in the shooting....if I don`t shoot my 45`s for a while...it takes time to get "back in the groove" so to speak.....it is a matter of control and sight management for each particular handgun.....I never concern myself with "limp wrist" or any such thing...way past that......so as it`s been said.....you need more time......here`s a suggestion for your sight alignment.....have your wrench/allen-whatever....fire one shot at a time...from 15feet.....until you know the sight is on at that distance....go from there.......many leo`s qualify at a distance as that...........B&G
Link Posted: 5/26/2002 6:11:26 AM EDT
By the way.....my first 1911 type was a amt.....better to learn on a lesser one then when you get a good quality you`ll appreciate it.......not necessarily true.....but worked that way for me.....when you are not "educated" enough....and somebody sells you a deal.....don`t feel bad...your in a large group there....just make the best of it......it`s important to shoot as many different handguns as you can...which you apparently are.....don`t be afraid to seek out as much info as possible....while you are "experimenting".....try this site also.....modelof1911a1.com.............
Link Posted: 5/26/2002 6:19:52 AM EDT
zougou

Here is some basic info that may just help you get through this period.

This is your first handgun but, not your last one

The biggest single difference between GLOCKs and most other handguns is the grip angle. If you like the grip angle of the 1911 you will probably be more comfortable with a SiG, SA X/D, CZ or Beretta than a GLOCK. GLOCKs are very good, very well made handguns but they do use a unique grip angle.

The quickest and best way to learn to shoot well is with Professional Training. The handgun itself is far less important than the hand holding the gun.

There are very few BAD handguns being made these days. The state of the art is now at a level that almost every manufacturer makes superb handguns. After all, it's been almost a century since something new has come along. By now, albout the only innovation happening is in materials.

You made a reasonable choice on your first pistol. With the additional experience gained, there is no reason to think that your future choices will be wrong. Just enjoy your CD and lust after your next handgun.
Link Posted: 5/26/2002 8:11:24 PM EDT
Thanks again to all who replied and have helped me.

I will certainly get training.

I know it's foolish, but I lust after a M11/9 or such.

Link Posted: 5/27/2002 5:51:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/27/2002 5:54:19 AM EDT by sig_230]
I don't see anything foolish about that. The SiG 228 is a really nice handgun. One other you should look at is the 225. It's a single stack 9mm and every single person that even picks one up swears that it feels like it was made just for them.

If you want to stay with your 45ACP, KY Imports has some LE trade-in SiG 220's for only $399.00. They also have some used SiG 228's (the M11/9) for $399.00 with a 13 round Mag. Check them out.
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