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Posted: 4/25/2003 3:31:30 AM EDT
Bought the gun back in the late 80's, about eight years ago, I let a local smith do an action job (and wasn't impressed with his work). The gun has two problems at present. First it's always had the problem of the ejector rod that holds the cylinder to the crain, works itself loose after about 30rnds or so. When this happens, it make it difficult to open the cylinder to eject and reload. Second, the smyth that did the action job, changed the mainspring tension somehow, so now the hammer falls just hard enough to reliably ignite soft Federal large pistol primers, but will not reliably ignite any other brand, say Winchester for example. I've considered sending it off to a big name smith, like Wilson or someone similar, but don't know how to go about shipping and recieving, and don't know if I'm willing to part with it for six months to a year. I'm also hesitant to trust this local gunsmith with it again. The gun is a keeper, and I'd really like to have the action light and smooth like some of the big dollar custom guns I see at the range somtimes, but most importantly, I want everything on it right again. I want the problem with the ejector rod fixed, and want it to reliably fire any ammo I feed it. Suggestions?
Link Posted: 4/25/2003 3:39:09 AM EDT
Talk to Teddy Jacobson

One of the best around, and he does it RIGHT, and does it quick.
Link Posted: 4/25/2003 4:53:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/25/2003 4:54:14 AM EDT by ikor]
Loose ejector rod:
Your S&W will have a left hand (backwards) thread on the rod. Take the front sideplate screw out and slide the cylinder/crane assembly forward and off the frame. Slide the cylinder back out of the crane assembly. Place the rod (always work on the cheapest part!) in a vice padded with rubber jaws or an old leather belt, etc. and place 3 empty cases in alternating chambers. Tighten the rod. Reassemble in reverse order. If it continues to work loose, you can take it completely out, degrease it and try some clear fingernail polish to the threads then tighten it again.

Mainspring tension:
Take the stocks/grip(s) off of the frame and check to see if the small screw at the bottom front of the frame is tightened all the way...if not, tighten it and test. If so, look to see if the end that contacts the mainspring is flat or rounded. If flat, it has probably been cut down to relieve tension and you may need to replace it. S&W has them for a couple bucks each. More than likely, this guy replaced the stock mainspring with an aftermarket part and either cut or replaced the rebound spring inside the rebound slide (which controls both part of the SA trigger pull and how much return spring pressure is on the trigger). In this case, you don't need a big-name gunsmith, but you do need someone who knows S&Ws, how they operate and what has or has not been done to the gun. An older LE armorer with factory training can do all you need and won't try and do a bunch of un-necessary stuff.

What it probably needs is a new mainspring, rebound spring and mainspring strain screw, then it can be correctly tuned by cutting NO MORE than two coils off the rebound spring and filing the strain screw a LITTLE. You will find that the .45 a.c.p. revolvers usually cannot be made as light as the .38/357 guns due to the springy-ness of the moon clips, which absorb some of the energy of the hammer. Smoooth is what you need.

Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 7:37:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ikor:
You will find that the .45 a.c.p. revolvers usually cannot be made as light as the .38/357 guns due to the springy-ness of the moon clips, which absorb some of the energy of the hammer. Smoooth is what you need.
Hope this helps.



I suspected this was the case but never heard anyone mention it (until now). thanks.
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