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Posted: 1/13/2006 9:29:53 AM EDT
I've got a 1973 S&W model 66 that has these features and I just wanted to know what benefit it gives me (besides higher resale value)? Does it increase the life of the handgun or enhance lockup in some way? Let me know, I'm quite curious about this. Thanks. MJD
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:01:55 AM EDT
I also own a pinned and recessed Mdl 66.

IMO those features were "nice to have" and marked
a time when they were willing to spend the money
to have those operations performed on their
revolvers.

No big deal other than a slightly higher resale premium.

Nice gun, eh?
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 10:22:23 AM EDT
I was thinking it didn't really do much, but it does show fine craftsmanship. The trigger is great and it's accurate as anything. I bought as a trade item at the last show I went to for $375 in great condition, with solid lockup. I figured I might be able to trade up one day for a used Sig if I ever want to get rid of it, but since it's no longer in production it's becoming more collectible. MJD
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 1:16:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By highwayman:
I was thinking it didn't really do much, but it does show fine craftsmanship. The trigger is great and it's accurate as anything. I bought as a trade item at the last show I went to for $375 in great condition, with solid lockup. I figured I might be able to trade up one day for a used Sig if I ever want to get rid of it you don't want to do that, but since it's no longer in production it's becoming more collectible. MJD

Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:30:28 PM EDT
It doesn't happen often but once in a while a barrel will back off, however pinned barrels don't back off.
When a Revolver is fired with a recessed cylinder the rear of the cylinder and the case rims are load bearing areas (360 degrees). whether the cylinder is fully loaded or not.
When a Revolver is fired with a non recessed cylinder the case rims are the load bearing area. If you shoot a non recessed gun, keep your cylinder full.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 11:00:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rabon:

When a Revolver is fired with a recessed cylinder the rear of the cylinder and the case rims are load bearing areas (360 degrees). whether the cylinder is fully loaded or not.
When a Revolver is fired with a non recessed cylinder the case rims are the load bearing area. If you shoot a non recessed gun, keep your cylinder full.



What happends when you shoot a half full cylinder in a non-recessed gun? I have done this a bunch and never had a problem.....I think.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 5:11:21 AM EDT
Sounds like it puts unnecessary stress on a single point. Probably not good for it. I guess I don't have to worry about that with the recessed cylinder. MJD
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 6:46:25 PM EDT
It will place stress on the base pin (S/A Revolver) crane assy (D/A Revolver). Unless your shooting at 50,000 plus chamber pressures, I wouldn't lose much sleep over it.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 8:21:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Rabon:
When a Revolver is fired with a non recessed cylinder the case rims are the load bearing area. If you shoot a non recessed gun, keep your cylinder full.



The only case rim that comes close to touching the breech face is the one under the firing pin, and even that one has a small amount of freeplay to avoid binding up the cylinder. All the other cartridges are free to slide back until they contact the recoil shield.

Truth be told, the non-recessed cylinders are a little more reliable, as they don't suffer from crud building up under the case rim as bad.

Also, barrels would not back off on a crush fit barrel/bframe, rather, if they rotated at all, they would get tighter.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 5:21:46 AM EDT
I don't think they do anything for performance. Resale value is for the collectors. The recessed chambers started back in the early 1931 when the K22 Outdoorsman came out(big advertising campain about the recessed chambers). 22 cases back then had a habit of blowing out at the head of the case. Barrel cross pinning was done when they used a different approach to tightening the barrels in the frames. Now they use a crush fit.
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