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Page Handguns » Colt
Posted: 1/10/2006 11:36:15 AM EDT
Bill Adair brought this back to life summer 2005. I originally found it rotting away at my local gun shop a few years ago. and to think members on this 1911 forum / thread said 'go buy it now for that $600'. Thank you by the way










Link Posted: 1/12/2006 12:02:26 AM EDT
Stunning
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 5:41:22 PM EDT
Very nice, I should start collecting these. I think 17 AK47s are enough....must...have...new Colt 1911....wallet coming out ....of my pocket....
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 5:48:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By xcibes:
Very nice, I should start collecting these. I think 17 AK47s are enough....must...have...new Colt 1911....wallet coming out ....of my pocket....



I really do like these besides my AK's.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 2:40:00 PM EDT
Thats one seriously beautiful pistol!
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 2:43:52 PM EDT
That's nice, real nice!

I'd like to get my 1924 Transitional Model spiffied up like that one of these days.

Danny

Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:28:12 AM EDT
You know that slide on your 1911A1 isn't original don't you??? But it is a pretty nice piece.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 5:45:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By lawdog:
You know that slide on your 1911A1 isn't original don't you??? But it is a pretty nice piece.



Whats not right?
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 6:38:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2006 6:41:33 PM EDT by JaketheSnake]

Originally Posted By coltjeeper:

Originally Posted By lawdog:
You know that slide on your 1911A1 isn't original don't you??? But it is a pretty nice piece.



Whats not right?


Elaborate please.

BTW I was thinking that too, but I'm no colt expert so my two cents are pretty much invalid to begin with.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 12:41:40 PM EDT
On the 1911A1 the frame has scallops where the trigger finger comes around to the trigger. When the original 1911 was invented it did not have the scalloped frame (and some other changes that went into the A1). The slide on the original 1911 (see the slide in the pic at the beginning of the thread) has NOT been lowered. Thus, the slide in the pic is from an original 1911 on a 1911A1 frame.

When the original 1911 was modified into the model 1911A1, the ejection port was lowered and flared on the slide along with some changes to the frame (such as the scallops).

His gun, although not "authentic", is still a real nice pistol. It just wouldn't have any real collector's status.

lawdog
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 12:43:56 PM EDT
Here is a pic of an "original" 1911 although it has been engraved.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 12:45:50 PM EDT
One more of the other side
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 12:52:43 PM EDT
Here is another good picture for reference.
Taken from world.gun.ru. ( Not My Picture )

"

In 1926, original design was improved, following the recommendations of the US Army Ordnanve Dept. These changes incorporate the following items (see picture above):
1. Wider front sight
2. Longer hammer spur
3. Shorter trigger
4. Curved spring housing
5. Simplified grip panels checkering
6. Index finger reliefs behind the trigger
7. Longer grip-safety spur
"
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 12:57:22 PM EDT
Just out of curiosity then - what kind of a value would you put on this piece? It has no collector value? A 1932 Commericial is 1932 commercial. I know what your saying about 'original - original', but good luck finding one of those.

Your 1911 is incredible BTW. just incredible.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 1:05:17 PM EDT
Travis, I'm not saying your Colt has no value. Not at all. I was just saying that, from a purists standpoint (as many hard-core collectors are) they wouldn't be interested in acquiring the pistol.

Now, also like I said, it is a really, really nice pistol and just from your pics, I would say it has a value in the range of 1,500 - 2,000. That would be someone wanting to acquire an "old" Colt.

Again.... NICE Colt you have there!!!!

lawdog
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 1:29:16 PM EDT
I have a Beautiful M1911 commercial on lay-away. I can't wait to get it and post pics for you guys.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:04:53 PM EDT
law- can you post some details about your colt? Really, really curious.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:29:30 PM EDT
The pistol is a 1911 Colt Commercial (Government Model) manufactured in 1919. It is 100% factory engraved with inlayed silver and genuine elephant ivory grips. It has 2 magazines that the base plates have also been engraved.

I acquired the piece from a dealer in California who got it from an estate sale. The pistol was originally made-to-order for a high-ranking military officer officer shortly after WWI. The Colt was in that man's family after he died. When his relatives died the gun was placed on auction. My dealer obtained the piece in the auction.

The gun is 98% NRA rated. Some dips%$#it has fired it at some point. There is the slightest hint of contact between the hammer and the frame when it was fired. Other than that, it is pristine.

The pistol cost me a pretty penny and I'm keeping it for my grandson (whenever I get one). Thanks for the compliments.

lawdog
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:41:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/23/2006 2:44:32 PM EDT by Combat_Jack]
And to think that I thought my 1969 commercial was badass.

Dude, cut that thing up!
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 2:55:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lawdog:
The pistol is a 1911 Colt Commercial (Government Model) manufactured in 1919. It is 100% factory engraved with inlayed silver and genuine elephant ivory grips. It has 2 magazines that the base plates have also been engraved.

I acquired the piece from a dealer in California who got it from an estate sale. The pistol was originally made-to-order for a high-ranking military officer officer shortly after WWI. The Colt was in that man's family after he died. When his relatives died the gun was placed on auction. My dealer obtained the piece in the auction.

The gun is 98% NRA rated. Some dips%$#it has fired it at some point. There is the slightest hint of contact between the hammer and the frame when it was fired. Other than that, it is pristine.

The pistol cost me a pretty penny and I'm keeping it for my grandson (whenever I get one). Thanks for the compliments.

lawdog



absolutley a heirloom. I had to save a pic of that.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 5:21:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lawdog:
On the 1911A1 the frame has scallops where the trigger finger comes around to the trigger. When the original 1911 was invented it did not have the scalloped frame (and some other changes that went into the A1). The slide on the original 1911 (see the slide in the pic at the beginning of the thread) has NOT been lowered. Thus, the slide in the pic is from an original 1911 on a 1911A1 frame.

When the original 1911 was modified into the model 1911A1, the ejection port was lowered and flared on the slide along with some changes to the frame (such as the scallops).

His gun, although not "authentic", is still a real nice pistol. It just wouldn't have any real collector's status.

lawdog



Well sir, you seem to know a lot about the 1911. I have a military 1911A1 as pictured below, and the slide looks (to me at least) just like the one Travis has. Is mine a mixed pistol like the one on this thread? I'm sorry but I just can't see the difference on the slide. Any help is appreciated.





Travis, I really love your pistol and if you don't want something which is not 100% original please send it my way for proper disposal.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 7:46:15 PM EDT
Is mine a mixed pistol like the one on this thread? I'm sorry but I just can't see the difference on the slide. Any help is appreciated.


With the commercial model of the 1911A1, you would definitely have all the "updates" (like the scalloped frame, lowered and flared ejection port, etc.). The commercial model was made specifically for sale on the retail market and would never be pieced from old 1911 parts.

The U.S. PROPERTY guns, however, is a different story. There were (depending upon the date) many pistols that were pieced together (i.e. 1911 slides and 1911A1 frames) and these are called "transition" pistols. Many were rebuilds by the military's armories. Again... it depends on the date the pistols were placed into service.

Without being able to look closer at the markings on your Colt, I'm unable to tell if it is one of those "transition" guns or if it is a "Frankencolt". Chances are though that it is a 1911A1 with a replacement slide from a 1911. Another feature to look for and that helps with identification is the finish on the gun. Depending upon the year of manufacture, there are several different types of finishes that were used.

Hope this info is helpful.

lawdog
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