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Posted: 8/29/2010 4:35:30 PM EDT
Ive never tried, I think it would be fun. From the ballistics table I was looking at just for ball ammo, it appears the drop @ 100 yards is about a foot. Sound about right?
Probably would be tough to hit pop cans, but melons would definitely be in danger.
Link Posted: 8/29/2010 5:07:44 PM EDT
I've tried it with gallon milk jugs, can't remember what the exact drop was but it was less than I though it would be. About 4 inches or less I aimed above the cap if memory serves me correct to hit square on the jug.
Link Posted: 8/29/2010 5:29:12 PM EDT
I have donw it for fun, w/ 45 and 40

I think I only aimed about a foot high less for 40 cal
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 12:55:15 AM EDT
Yeah, drop should be 8-12 inches at a hundred.

Instead of holding at a point over the target, try this: Perch the target on top of your front sight like you were shooting a small dot at close range. Now, lift the front sight out of the rear sight channel. Instead of the flat plane of front and rear sight that we were taught to have, you should have the front sight sticking up a little bit, with your melon sitting on top of the front sight. A little practice should teach you exactly how much front sight to hold up.
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 4:35:45 AM EDT
With my 5" Kimber 1911, I was able to knock down 3 bowling pins with 5 shots a while back. This was from a seated, stable rest.
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 6:25:54 AM EDT
I seem to remember a member here who posted pics of himself shooting his .45 at 500 yards or so.

And getting consistent hits.

He posted pics of the sight picture he used at various distances.
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 6:53:58 AM EDT
archive link "The 1911 at long range"









Originally posted by TexasRifleman:
One more thing. We started counting the time between the report and the sight of the bullet impact in the dirt.

4 seconds of flight time.
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 1:38:50 PM EDT
I Love the holes in the top of barrel

Oh to see a high speed flick of the impact
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 4:48:51 PM EDT
There's a picture in my Sierra reloading manual of a competitive shooter with a 5 inch, 5 shot group at 100 yards with a Kimber and those dollar-a-pop Sierra bullets.
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 4:53:00 PM EDT
Oh it will kill ya but you might have to take about three to hit a 6ft target also if it moving that's a real hard shot I would say maybe a 165gr GD with like a full charge of tight group ....
Originally Posted By Eastwood123:
Ive never tried, I think it would be fun. From the ballistics table I was looking at just for ball ammo, it appears the drop @ 100 yards is about a foot. Sound about right?
Probably would be tough to hit pop cans, but melons would definitely be in danger.


Link Posted: 8/30/2010 7:39:57 PM EDT
You should read Elmer Keith book Hell I Was There
I have not read it in years but I believe, in that book.
There is a story, Elmer was working with the Army.
(don't remember why)
An Officer said something about how unaccurate the forty five was.
Elmer, took him up on it. Had them walk off a 100 yard. to a snow bank.
He put in a 7 round mag and shot at the snow bank.
Yes he walked them to the bank.
Then he put a second mag in.
Put all seven rounds in the snow bank.
If I remembered right, Elmer turned to the Officer,
an asked if he wanted to stand out on the snow bank
for the third mag. No he did not!
I butchered this, I know. So read the book!

PITA45
Link Posted: 8/30/2010 8:28:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By abpt1:
Oh it will kill ya but you might have to take about three to hit a 6ft target



Bullshit.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 4:17:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By vanilla_gorilla:
Yeah, drop should be 8-12 inches at a hundred.

Instead of holding at a point over the target, try this: Perch the target on top of your front sight like you were shooting a small dot at close range. Now, lift the front sight out of the rear sight channel. Instead of the flat plane of front and rear sight that we were taught to have, you should have the front sight sticking up a little bit, with your melon sitting on top of the front sight. A little practice should teach you exactly how much front sight to hold up.


so basically, you're dropping the rear sight, correct? this is a neat concept if you really think about it. truthfully i think it would be easier for me to use the old hold-over technique, but i will be sure to try this next outing - i may surprise myself.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:14:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TexasRifleman:
archive link "The 1911 at long range"

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/seven_sixtwo/Shooting/DSC02589reszed.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/seven_sixtwo/Shooting/DSC02593resized.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/seven_sixtwo/Drawings/1911holdover.jpg



Originally posted by TexasRifleman:
One more thing. We started counting the time between the report and the sight of the bullet impact in the dirt.

4 seconds of flight time.



I'd love to see someone do something at the 300/400/500yrd ranges. My oh my.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 6:17:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Checkmate762:
Originally Posted By vanilla_gorilla:
Yeah, drop should be 8-12 inches at a hundred.

Instead of holding at a point over the target, try this: Perch the target on top of your front sight like you were shooting a small dot at close range. Now, lift the front sight out of the rear sight channel. Instead of the flat plane of front and rear sight that we were taught to have, you should have the front sight sticking up a little bit, with your melon sitting on top of the front sight. A little practice should teach you exactly how much front sight to hold up.


so basically, you're dropping the rear sight, correct? this is a neat concept if you really think about it. truthfully i think it would be easier for me to use the old hold-over technique, but i will be sure to try this next outing - i may surprise myself.


You've got it. At longer ranges, this sighting method allows for more consistency.
Link Posted: 9/1/2010 5:50:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By vanilla_gorilla:

Originally Posted By Checkmate762:
Originally Posted By vanilla_gorilla:
Yeah, drop should be 8-12 inches at a hundred.

Instead of holding at a point over the target, try this: Perch the target on top of your front sight like you were shooting a small dot at close range. Now, lift the front sight out of the rear sight channel. Instead of the flat plane of front and rear sight that we were taught to have, you should have the front sight sticking up a little bit, with your melon sitting on top of the front sight. A little practice should teach you exactly how much front sight to hold up.


so basically, you're dropping the rear sight, correct? this is a neat concept if you really think about it. truthfully i think it would be easier for me to use the old hold-over technique, but i will be sure to try this next outing - i may surprise myself.


You've got it. At longer ranges, this sighting method allows for more consistency.


gotcha.
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 11:15:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By pita45:
You should read Elmer Keith book Hell I Was There
I have not read it in years but I believe, in that book.
There is a story, Elmer was working with the Army.
(don't remember why)
An Officer said something about how unaccurate the forty five was.
Elmer, took him up on it. Had them walk off a 100 yard. to a snow bank.
He put in a 7 round mag and shot at the snow bank.
Yes he walked them to the bank.
Then he put a second mag in.
Put all seven rounds in the snow bank.
If I remembered right, Elmer turned to the Officer,
an asked if he wanted to stand out on the snow bank
for the third mag. No he did not!
I butchered this, I know. So read the book!

PITA45



I love that man
one of my first reloading books I bought when I was young

almost any handgun can be used at LR even a J frame

Link Posted: 9/3/2010 12:40:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By runawayabc123:
Originally Posted By TexasRifleman:
archive link "The 1911 at long range"

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/seven_sixtwo/Shooting/DSC02589reszed.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/seven_sixtwo/Shooting/DSC02593resized.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh131/seven_sixtwo/Drawings/1911holdover.jpg



Originally posted by TexasRifleman:
One more thing. We started counting the time between the report and the sight of the bullet impact in the dirt.

4 seconds of flight time.



I'd love to see someone do something at the 300/400/500yrd ranges. My oh my.

This was 500 yards.

That's why the holes are in the top of the drum. 4 seconds of flight time, approx 60 feet of holdover.

Link Posted: 9/3/2010 6:44:05 PM EDT
If you're pretty good with a handgun (can hit 3-4" targets at 25 yds consistently), you'll be surprised what you can do at 100 with any handgun until you've tried it. Once you figure out the sight picture you need, you can be pretty consistent on a reasonably sized target like a silhouette. It's best to have steel targets. The .45 is so big and slow you can see the bullet if you're using the 230-grain loads. Not that you can see it well, but you'll get a glimpse of it in flight.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 2:14:20 PM EDT
TexasRifleman - That was freakin awesome!

Link Posted: 9/15/2010 3:41:08 PM EDT
Using the sighting technique mentioned previously of raising the front sight above the rear sight I was knocking over soda cans at 100 yards while shooting .38 special semi-wadcutter target loads out of a 4" S&W Model 27 .357 Magnum off the bench. The rifle shooters didn't believe it could be done with a handgun. Once you find the right amount of front sight to hold over it is really pretty easy. My buddy and I practice at banging the gongs offhand at 75 and 100 yards pretty regularly with the .45 and 9mm. Elmer Keith claimed to have made a 600 yard shot with a 4" .44 Magnum.
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