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Posted: 7/26/2010 7:51:02 PM EDT
I'm planning on purchasing a 92FS. Or an M9.

Biggest difference between them?

Any difference in the new production (made in Italy? or USA) and used?

Any years I should stay away from?
Link Posted: 7/26/2010 8:16:33 PM EDT
There are many small differences, but they are all basically the same pistol. I prefer the older 92FS Italian models the best.
Link Posted: 7/26/2010 10:35:23 PM EDT
Older Beretta 92s will have a straight dustcover, no radius cut in the grip, and will have no warning label on the dustcover. They will usually always have metal parts (trigger, guide rod, decock/safety levers, magazine release).

Newer Beretta 92s will have a slanted dustcover, a radius cut in the grip, and will have a warning label on the dustcover. The slanted dustcover frame is slightly stronger since it is technically a Beretta 96 frame. They will usually always have plastic parts (trigger, guide rod, decock/safety levers, magazine release).

M9s will always have the straight dustcover, and no radius cut. I'm not sure about warning labels.

No real difference between Italian or American 92s except for markings (M9 will always be made in the USA)

It really boils down to personal preference. I prefer newer Berettas because they have the radius cut which makes its slightly easier to reach the trigger.

I'd buy the cheapest NIB Beretta 92FS or M9 you can find.

Link Posted: 7/27/2010 7:59:03 AM EDT
The M9 also has the military NSN on the slide.
Link Posted: 8/2/2010 7:17:41 AM EDT
Thanks for the input; now I just have to find one.
Link Posted: 8/3/2010 2:54:59 PM EDT
Newer pistols have plastic guide rods, triggers, etc.
Link Posted: 8/5/2010 9:21:42 AM EDT
is the safety/decock lever really plastic? My 92fs has the other plastic parts but the safety seemed to me like it is metal. A plastic safety just doesn't seem right...
Link Posted: 8/5/2010 9:27:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By njitmetal:
is the safety/decock lever really plastic? My 92fs has the other plastic parts but the safety seemed to me like it is metal. A plastic safety just doesn't seem right...


Yes

If you look at current production Inox models, they have black plastic decock/safety levers you can clearly see. Older Inox models had Inox finished metal levers.

Frankly, I don't mind the plastic parts except for the plastic trigger.
Link Posted: 8/5/2010 11:44:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2010 11:53:03 AM EDT by TrackSol]
Actually, the trigger, trigger bar and left side safety lever (not the whole safety) are polymer (not plastic) coated metal. The guide rod is sompletely polymer and is actually an improvement over the original guide rod. The new one has groves to prevent dirt and sand from causing binding. Finally, metal on metal wears more and requires lube. Lube attracts particles. It's a constant battle. A polymer coated part that rubs against metal will last longer and if made of the right construction will be slipery enough to not require lube (think delrin).

People don't complain about the lack of strength in polymer AR15 mags and stocks....
Link Posted: 8/26/2010 7:57:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By nf9648:
Newer pistols have plastic guide rods, triggers, etc.


Night and day difference between the newer and older 92FS pistols. Plastic parts SUCK IMHO...

Here is my 'old' 92FS BATS kit:



They only made 200 of these. It came with a matching Beretta Airlight knife, Beretta aluminum locking case, The standard Beretta plastic case, A Beretta marked gun lock, Beretta marked wrap around grips, A 10rnd and a 15rnd Italy mag and best of all: NO plastic guide rod, NO plastic trigger, NO plastic safety garbage...


And then the bean counters came along and started giving people 'less' for more money...
Link Posted: 8/26/2010 9:52:32 PM EDT
I have a newer Beretta and would recommend just getting a new one. They have all the small strength improvements over the years and the improved radius on the beaver tail area just makes for a more comfortable grip.

You get over the "plastic" parts quickly too because the pistol is all black anyway so it all blends in well together. Honestly I think only those that grew up with all metal parts seem to be bothered by the plastic parts which I can understand since that is what they were always used to.

Also your probably going to pay more for an older model than a newer one if the condition is equal...so if it doesn't bother you to have some plastic parts then just go newer.
Link Posted: 8/27/2010 6:26:43 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cleis102:
I have a newer Beretta and would recommend just getting a new one. They have all the small strength improvements over the years and the improved radius on the beaver tail area just makes for a more comfortable grip.

You get over the "plastic" parts quickly too because the pistol is all black anyway so it all blends in well together. Honestly I think only those that grew up with all metal parts seem to be bothered by the plastic parts which I can understand since that is what they were always used to.

Also your probably going to pay more for an older model than a newer one if the condition is equal...so if it doesn't bother you to have some plastic parts then just go newer.


That is like trying to argue that having a 'small weiner' is better than a big one.

Most girls will accept a small one if that is all they can get right now, but in the back of their mind they WISH they had bigger because they KNOW that bigger is always better...

Metal is more durable than plastic. Plastic is not a strength improvement. It is an effort to save money on the part of Beretta (and other manufacturers).

Link Posted: 8/27/2010 9:40:00 PM EDT
I don't know why people get so worked up about polymer parts. I mean a Glock is pretty much all polymer and is considered one of the most reliable handguns ever made. Tests I've seen with even newer 92FS pistols have shown them to be just as durable as all metal ones.

As I already stated, only the guide rod and right side safety lever are completely polymer. Everything else is metal core and coated in polymer. The transfer bar being polymer coated is easier on the frame's finish. The guide rod is fluted to function better with grit or sand. Also it being potentially "weaker" is better as the cheapest part to replace would break before a much more expensive part would.

As far as accuracy, there hasn't been anything scientific that I have come across and any differences found by professional shooters has been within the standard deviation in manufacturing tolerances.

I would say that if you're going to upgrade the trigger springs or do trigger work I would get the metal trigger and sear.
Link Posted: 8/28/2010 8:56:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ar-15TechGuy:
Originally Posted By Cleis102:
I have a newer Beretta and would recommend just getting a new one. They have all the small strength improvements over the years and the improved radius on the beaver tail area just makes for a more comfortable grip.

You get over the "plastic" parts quickly too because the pistol is all black anyway so it all blends in well together. Honestly I think only those that grew up with all metal parts seem to be bothered by the plastic parts which I can understand since that is what they were always used to.

Also your probably going to pay more for an older model than a newer one if the condition is equal...so if it doesn't bother you to have some plastic parts then just go newer.


That is like trying to argue that having a 'small weiner' is better than a big one.

Most girls will accept a small one if that is all they can get right now, but in the back of their mind they WISH they had bigger because they KNOW that bigger is always better...

Metal is more durable than plastic. Plastic is not a strength improvement. It is an effort to save money on the part of Beretta (and other manufacturers).



Not entirely true, women dont care about size, all they want is your tongue and your wallet. I will admit I was a bit dissappointed that the M9 I purchased had so many differences compared to the 44 mil issue M9's sitting in my arms room. The metal trigger is the only part I cannot find, everything else plastic has since been replaced.

Link Posted: 8/31/2010 5:30:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2010 5:31:32 AM EDT by Milo5]


This M9 is all metal.
I bought it as one of the first releases of military contract overruns several years ago.
Even the guide rod is metal.
It is one of my favorite 9mm handguns.
Link Posted: 8/31/2010 5:15:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By nf9648:

The metal trigger is the only part I cannot find, everything else plastic has since been replaced.


You may buy metal trigger from:

http://www.partsandmore.com/

All Beretta parts listed are steel.

Link Posted: 9/1/2010 8:04:07 PM EDT
Any idea when they started putting plastic parts in?

Link Posted: 9/2/2010 3:28:34 AM EDT
Around 2003 or so, if I remember right
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 3:36:28 AM EDT
2001 for the guide rods, it was a request by the Military. The channels in the god rod will strip out dirt, grit, sand etc. Also if the weapon is dropped with the slide locked to the rear the metal guide rod would bend and make the pistol inoperable. With the polymer guide rod it has flex, so the weapon can still work.
Link Posted: 9/2/2010 9:09:26 AM EDT
Well, I have prev obtained metal parts for the various polymer parts.

However - IMHO, the polymer mag release is better if you carry the gun (my 92FS is my concealed carry gun). The polymer won't rust like a metal mag release will. I've already had issues with the grip screws rusting until I obtained NP3 covered grip screws to solve that issue
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 11:31:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Richard257:
Originally Posted By nf9648:

The metal trigger is the only part I cannot find, everything else plastic has since been replaced.


You may buy metal trigger from:

http://www.partsandmore.com/

All Beretta parts listed are steel.



Are they new or used? If used, what kind of shape are they in?
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 5:43:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Milo5:
http://www.fototime.com/EEBAE46D45BD245/standard.jpg

This M9 is all metal.
I bought it as one of the first releases of military contract overruns several years ago.
Even the guide rod is metal.
It is one of my favorite 9mm handguns.




Sweet!
Link Posted: 9/3/2010 10:52:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SSeric02:
Originally Posted By Richard257:
Originally Posted By nf9648:

The metal trigger is the only part I cannot find, everything else plastic has since been replaced.


You may buy metal trigger from:

http://www.partsandmore.com/

All Beretta parts listed are steel.




Are they new or used? If used, what kind of shape are they in?


All parts are brand new and beautiful (no nicks, scratches or any flaws).
Too bad I don't have a digital camera anymore. I'd post pics of them.

Link Posted: 9/4/2010 12:38:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Richard257:
Originally Posted By SSeric02:
Originally Posted By Richard257:
Originally Posted By nf9648:

The metal trigger is the only part I cannot find, everything else plastic has since been replaced.


You may buy metal trigger from:

http://www.partsandmore.com/

All Beretta parts listed are steel.




Are they new or used? If used, what kind of shape are they in?


All parts are brand new and beautiful (no nicks, scratches or any flaws).
Too bad I don't have a digital camera anymore. I'd post pics of them.



Gonna call on monday, for the trigger and 4 slotted screws since my "M9" came with hex screws.
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 6:11:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ar-15TechGuy:
Originally Posted By Cleis102:
I have a newer Beretta and would recommend just getting a new one. They have all the small strength improvements over the years and the improved radius on the beaver tail area just makes for a more comfortable grip.

You get over the "plastic" parts quickly too because the pistol is all black anyway so it all blends in well together. Honestly I think only those that grew up with all metal parts seem to be bothered by the plastic parts which I can understand since that is what they were always used to.

Also your probably going to pay more for an older model than a newer one if the condition is equal...so if it doesn't bother you to have some plastic parts then just go newer.


That is like trying to argue that having a 'small weiner' is better than a big one.

Most girls will accept a small one if that is all they can get right now, but in the back of their mind they WISH they had bigger because they KNOW that bigger is always better...

Metal is more durable than plastic. Plastic is not a strength improvement. It is an effort to save money on the part of Beretta (and other manufacturers).



Polymer parts have a proven track record in firearms and in fact are often preferred by many shooters. Besides the strength improvements I was referring to were the slanted dust cover and locking block improvements over the earliest models.
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