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Posted: 2/9/2006 1:39:48 PM EDT
I am new to Beretta 92FS and think it is a wondeerful smooth gun, my question would be with the fixed sights how do you make any adjustments??? My groups always are out to the left. I am shooting offhand at about 10 yards. The groups are small enough if I do my part but are aboput 4" to the left.??? help
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 4:51:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 4:53:16 PM EDT by Echox9005]
First off, try letting someone else shoot the gun and see where their hitting. It may just be a problem with your technique. If it still is hitting left, take it to a gun shop or gun smith, they'll do the adjustment for you. Do not use punches, they will only scratch the finish and will not be effective for sight adjustment.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 5:09:38 PM EDT
Switch hands. Switch eyes.
See what happens.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 5:37:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Echox9005:
First off, try letting someone else shoot the gun and see where their hitting. It may just be a problem with your technique. If it still is hitting left, take it to a gun shop or gun smith, they'll do the adjustment for you. Do not use punches, they will only scratch the finish and will not be effective for sight adjustment.



+1 It could very well be that your not gripping the hand grips correctly and pushing the shots left.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 8:01:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Echox9005:
First off, try letting someone else shoot the gun and see where their hitting. It may just be a problem with your technique. If it still is hitting left, take it to a gun shop or gun smith, they'll do the adjustment for you. Do not use punches, they will only scratch the finish and will not be effective for sight adjustment.




I'm curious as to how they do it? Because that's all I did was put it in a vice with some leather around it (the slide), and took a brass punch and drifted it. This was after I had some others shoot it too. But that's what I knew to do. I did however scratch the finish while doing it. But I don't see how it's not effective for sight adjustment.

FWIW, I drifted out a rear sight on my 1911 and replaced it with this same method and it worked just fine with no scratching of the finish. I really love my Beretta but that finish is not as good as the finish is on my Millet rear sight I installed. Oh crap, I just remembered, I put tape on my millet rear sight. Crap . I probably could've avoided the scratching!!!!! Ooooops. I still think that finish is different though.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:08:17 PM EDT
As mentioned b4 it could very well be you and not the gun if you had to adjust the sites on your 1911 also.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 3:01:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/10/2006 3:02:03 AM EDT by JoeInCT]
FWIW. I was hitting left also with my 92 Brig, found I was putting too much finger on the trigger. When I adjusted that, my rounds centered.


Link Posted: 2/10/2006 4:01:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MrMurphy:
As mentioned b4 it could very well be you and not the gun if you had to adjust the sites on your 1911 also.



I put a higher sight on it because it was shooting low. For more than just me. It is a common problem with springfields. I'm pretty sure it wasn't me. With the beretta I'm not so sure. But after floating it, it did help my POI be more centered. You may be right though.

It kind of seems like you're saying every pistol that comes out of every factory will be totally zero'd with whatever ammo you're shooting. I have a hard time with that. For example. When I shot Federal 185 HP's it raised it to a much better poi, pretty much right on. But I knew I wasn't going to be shoothing that regularily. Any of the 230 grain FMJ stuff was 6-8" low at 25 yards. So I opted for a taller rear sight to zero with ammo I'd probably be shooting 90% of the time.

Now, this beretta is a whole different ball game. When I shot it free hand it seemed to shoot low and left. When I benched it, it wasn't low but it was still left. Now that could be me. But I also had a friend try it and he know's pistols pretty good and he was doing the same thing. It could very well possibly be us. But at this point, I floated it.

But beyond all that, you didn't educate me on how a gunsmith does it differently. If there is some reason that moving it is not the proper thing to do, I would like to hear why you think that is. I mean that.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 4:56:36 PM EDT
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I do not consider scratching the finish while using a punch to adjust sights effective.
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 6:27:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Echox9005:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I do not consider scratching the finish while using a punch to adjust sights effective.



Yes, I agree, except that I did the same thing with my 1911 (although I put some tape on it first) and it didn't scratch it at all. The tape was more of a deterrent than anything because it eventually came off. And again the finish didn't scratch at all. Now maybe an armorer would've known that the Beretta's finish is different but I was wondering what he would've did differently. I realize some things are better left to professionals, yet I like to know how to do some of this stuff myself. I also realize that glock has a tool you just tighten down on it and it floats it, but I've never heard of that for a 1911 or a beretta. Maybe there is one? Do you know? I was wondering if you had some technical knowledge of this, because it seemed like you might, but I'm not hearing any. All I heard you say was "take it to a gunsmith." But you were right, it did scratch the finish, but the second part of your statement was "it would not be effective" That's the part that I'm wondering about. Since I already scratched it, (woop de ding) how is it not effective? And again, how would a gunsmith have done it different?
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:41:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JJREA:

Originally Posted By Echox9005:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I do not consider scratching the finish while using a punch to adjust sights effective.



Yes, I agree, except that I did the same thing with my 1911 (although I put some tape on it first) and it didn't scratch it at all. The tape was more of a deterrent than anything because it eventually came off. And again the finish didn't scratch at all. Now maybe an armorer would've known that the Beretta's finish is different but I was wondering what he would've did differently. I realize some things are better left to professionals, yet I like to know how to do some of this stuff myself. I also realize that glock has a tool you just tighten down on it and it floats it, but I've never heard of that for a 1911 or a beretta. Maybe there is one? Do you know? I was wondering if you had some technical knowledge of this, because it seemed like you might, but I'm not hearing any. All I heard you say was "take it to a gunsmith." But you were right, it did scratch the finish, but the second part of your statement was "it would not be effective" That's the part that I'm wondering about. Since I already scratched it, (woop de ding) how is it not effective? And again, how would a gunsmith have done it different?



A gunsmith would have used an MGW Semi-Auto Sight Mover ($82.02 from Brownells).
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 8:16:06 PM EDT
Don't touch it! Maybe you'll hit a liberal!
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 12:41:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JoeInCT:
FWIW. I was hitting left also with my 92 Brig, found I was putting too much finger on the trigger. When I adjusted that, my rounds centered.


img456.imageshack.us/img456/3119/righttarget9py4ch.th.jpg



Good graphic.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:50:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Mike_AK:

Originally Posted By JJREA:

Originally Posted By Echox9005:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I do not consider scratching the finish while using a punch to adjust sights effective.



Yes, I agree, except that I did the same thing with my 1911 (although I put some tape on it first) and it didn't scratch it at all. The tape was more of a deterrent than anything because it eventually came off. And again the finish didn't scratch at all. Now maybe an armorer would've known that the Beretta's finish is different but I was wondering what he would've did differently. I realize some things are better left to professionals, yet I like to know how to do some of this stuff myself. I also realize that glock has a tool you just tighten down on it and it floats it, but I've never heard of that for a 1911 or a beretta. Maybe there is one? Do you know? I was wondering if you had some technical knowledge of this, because it seemed like you might, but I'm not hearing any. All I heard you say was "take it to a gunsmith." But you were right, it did scratch the finish, but the second part of your statement was "it would not be effective" That's the part that I'm wondering about. Since I already scratched it, (woop de ding) how is it not effective? And again, how would a gunsmith have done it different?



A gunsmith would have used an MGW Semi-Auto Sight Mover ($82.02 from Brownells).



When you winked, does that mean you're kidding or are you serious? I'm figuring you're probably right, because I've heard of such tools before. Oh well, I've shot it plenty since I've floated it and it seems to be hitting where it needs to be. So I don't know if it's me or not but I'm happy with it. Very happy. I love that pistol.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 9:44:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JJREA:

Originally Posted By Mike_AK:

Originally Posted By JJREA:

Originally Posted By Echox9005:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I do not consider scratching the finish while using a punch to adjust sights effective.



Yes, I agree, except that I did the same thing with my 1911 (although I put some tape on it first) and it didn't scratch it at all. The tape was more of a deterrent than anything because it eventually came off. And again the finish didn't scratch at all. Now maybe an armorer would've known that the Beretta's finish is different but I was wondering what he would've did differently. I realize some things are better left to professionals, yet I like to know how to do some of this stuff myself. I also realize that glock has a tool you just tighten down on it and it floats it, but I've never heard of that for a 1911 or a beretta. Maybe there is one? Do you know? I was wondering if you had some technical knowledge of this, because it seemed like you might, but I'm not hearing any. All I heard you say was "take it to a gunsmith." But you were right, it did scratch the finish, but the second part of your statement was "it would not be effective" That's the part that I'm wondering about. Since I already scratched it, (woop de ding) how is it not effective? And again, how would a gunsmith have done it different?



A gunsmith would have used an MGW Semi-Auto Sight Mover ($82.02 from Brownells).



When you winked, does that mean you're kidding or are you serious? I'm figuring you're probably right, because I've heard of such tools before. Oh well, I've shot it plenty since I've floated it and it seems to be hitting where it needs to be. So I don't know if it's me or not but I'm happy with it. Very happy. I love that pistol.



Link Posted: 2/26/2006 10:21:04 PM EDT
your 92fs is probably sighted well from the factory...I have two of them and my technique was the problem in every instance of shooting off.
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