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1/14/2017 8:11:35 PM
Posted: 5/5/2014 6:26:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/19/2015 12:58:10 AM EST by M4A1Carbine]
Original post - Beretta 92 variants
Post 1 - 92FS vs M9
Post 2 - Spring weights, technical specs and links

I thought I'd consolidate a lot of information and questions people typically have about the 92 series of pistols. Feel free to post any additional information or correct anything I've posted and I'll try to update the OP as necessary. I do not take credit for a lot of the info here, some of which has been taken from previous threads here.

Beretta designations for calibers:
92 - 9x19mm
96 - .40S&W
98 - 9x21 IMI
99 - 7.65mm Luger
*Please note Beretta included G and D slides in a variety of different variants, usually for police contracts. The Compact L, Compact M, Centurion, Full size, etc frames all had various combinations of -G and -D configured slides depending on what the customer requested.

92 (1976)
The original Beretta 92 with a step slide, frame mounted safety and magazine release located on the grip. Between 5000 - 7000 were made with the step slide design before it was dropped for the straight slide in 1977.


92 (1977)
An updated 92 with a smooth slide but still had the frame mounted safety and magazine release located on the grip.


92S (1978)
In order to meet requirements of some law enforcement agencies, Beretta modified the Beretta 92 by adding a slide-mounted combined safety and decocking lever, replacing the frame mounted manual thumb safety. This resulted in the 92S which was adopted by several Italian law enforcement and military units. The later relocation of the magazine release button means these models (92 & 92S) cannot necessarily use later magazines, unless they have notches in both areas.


93R (1979 - 1993)
A select fire version on the 92 capable of three round burst. The R stands for Raffica which is Italian for "burst."


92SB (1981-1991)
Designed for the USAF. Added a firing pin block, ambidextrous safety/decocker and moved the magazine release from the grip to the bottom of the trigger guard.


92SB Compact (1981 - 1991)
Compact version on the 92SB. Overall length was 197 mm, barrel length 103 mm, magazine capacity 13 rounds (also accepted standard 15-round magazines).


92SB Compact Type M (1983)
Compact version of the 92SB with single stack 8 rd magazines.


92F (1984)
Designed for US government testing and Later adopted by the US military as the M9. Changes included:
"Design of all the parts to make them 100% interchangeable to simplify maintenance for large government organizations.
Modified the front of the trigger guard so that one could use finger support for easier aiming.
Recurved the forward base of the grip to aid aiming. Hard chromed the barrel bore to protect it from corrosion and to reduce wear.
New surface coating on the slide called Bruniton, which allegedly provides better corrosion resistance than the previous plain blued finish."


M9 (1985)
Designed for the US military to replace the 1911A1, originally modeled on the 92F and then later on the 92FS. The M9 features a strait dust cover, non radiused back strap and "snowman" style half moon and dot sight. It does not have the standard "read owner's manual" warnings. Military M9s will also have assembly numbers on the hammer. Beretta made a desert storm version with "OFFICIAL SIDEARM U.S. ARMED FORCES" on the slide.


M9 General Officer (1985)
Designed to replace the RIA M15 1911. It is identical to the standard M9 sidearm, with standard Bruniton-polymer finish and black composite grips, except it has a "GO"-prefix to its serial number range, starting with GO-001. It comes with a metal belt buckle that comes in gold metal for Army generals and silver metal for Air Force generals.


92G (1989)
Features a decocking lever on the slide like the F but does not function as a safety. Created at the request of the Gendarmerie Nationale de France. Also manufactured under license in France by GIAT Industries as the PA MAS G1.


92FS (1989)
Made with an enlarged hammer pin to prevent the side from coming off the rear of the gun in the event the slide breaks. Earlier models had a strait dust cover, later models use a curved dust cover. The 92FS has a radiused back strap and three dot style sights different from the M9.


92FS INOX
Stainless "INOX" pistols manufactured in Italy with a stainless steel slide, anodized frame, and all lightly bead blasted to make the slide / frame appear as one type of metal. Came with three dot fixed sights and plastic guide rod.


92FS Compact Type L (1989)
Compact version on the 92FS, came with 13 rd magazine (also accepted standard 15-round magazines).


92FS Compact Type M (1989)
Compact version of the 92fs with single stack 8 rd magazines.


92 DS (1990)
Double action only with a spurless hammer and manual safety, 18 lb hammer spring.


92D (1990)
Double action only with a spurless hammer and no safety lever, 18 lb hammer spring.


92CB (1992 - 1993)
Single action only with front barrel bushing.

92 Stock (1994)
Heavier Brigadier slide. It is also designed for sport shooting and includes a front barrel bushing for improved accuracy.



92 Combat (1994 - 2001)
Designed for sport shooting, came with a heavier Brigadier slide, single-action only and a front barrel bushing for improved accuracy. It also came with an additional longer barrel that was weighted.




Beretta 92FS Brigadier (1996)
A version of the Model 92FS with a reinforced, thickened slide; another change is that the front sight is not integral to the slide, but is dovetailed into it.


Beretta 92FS Centurion (1996)
A version of the Model 92FS with a compact barrel and slide assembly mounted on the full sized frame.


92 Elite 1 (1999 - 2001)
Included the heavier Brigadier bruniton finished slide with front serrations, Inox finished stainless barrel, thin skeletonized hammer, bevel of the magazine well and flat hammer spring cap. Came with decock only (G-Model) feature and dovetailed front sight.

92 Billennium (2001)
A limited edition to celebrate the millennium, 2000 were made and 1000 imported into the US. Featured a brigadier slide and frame mounted safety.


92 Elite 1A (2001)
This option is essentially a black Vertec with a bruniton Brigadier G slide, blackened stainless barrel and thicker skeleton hammer.



92 Elite 2 (2001)
This option replaced the Elite I option in 2001 and includes the same features as the original Elite plus removable Novak type sights, extended magazine release catch, checkered front/rear grip strap, thicker (than Elite I) skeletonized hammer, and lighter D-spring. This option is available only with the stainless G-Model slide, also with front serrations. The stainless barrel for the Elite II has a target crown.


92G-SD (2002 - 2005)
The "Special Duty" variant (aka Super Dave variant) was designed by Dave Harrington as his ideal Beretta 92. Basically combines an M9A1 frame with a 92G Brigadier slide, plus a stainless steel barrel w/ target crown.


Beretta 92 Vertec (2003)
A version of the Model 92FS that addressed constant complaints about the excessive grip width of Model 92 pistols. The backstrap of the grip on Vertec models is made more linear; another change is the addition of an integral Picatinny rail to the frame.


Steel 1 (2004)
A collectors edition with a steel frame version and nickle plating. Available in both SAO or DA/SA.


Beretta 90Two (2006)
A face-lift version of the basic Model 92 design. Key changes are modular one-piece grip panels (available in various shapes), integral Picatinny rail under the barrel (with cover), restyled slide and integral recoil buffer built into action.


M9A1 (2006) - A version of the M9 with an integrated Picatinny rail, aggressive checkering on front and rear grip, beveled mag well and sand resistant magazines (PVD coating). Issued to the United States Marine Corps.


92A1 (2010)
The 92A1 was based on elements of 92FS and 90two. The overall shape and styling builds on the 92FS, with an accessory rail on the underside of the frame; internal design reflects the 90two. Included a removable front sight, captured guide rod, automatic locking take down lever, curved trigger guard and the 90-two style rail. Made in Italy and came with three 17 rd magazines.


92FS Compact L M9A1 (2011)
A compact version of the 92FS made in the US, now with a M9A1 style frame and available in INOX.


M9A3 (2015)
A Beretta Engineering Change Proposal for the M9, includes many new features such as dovetailed night sights, vertec grip, threaded barrel, interchangeable "F" and "G" decocking levers, over center safety levers, three slot 1913 rail, larger magazine release, M9A1 grip checkering and beveled mag well, and earth tone finish.
Link Posted: 5/5/2014 6:26:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/30/2014 4:04:20 PM EST by M4A1Carbine]
Standard 92FS vs Civilian M9*:
- Dustcover shape: angled (92FS) vs straight (M9)
- Dustcover, right: read manual warning** (92FS) vs "U.S. 9mm M9-BERETTA U.S.A.-65490" (M9)
- Dustcover, left: serial prefix "BERxxxxxx" (92FS) vs "M9-xxxxxx" (M9)
- Backstrap: radiused below beavertail (92FS) vs straight (M9)
- Sights: 3-dot (92FS) vs 2-dot/post (M9)
- Slide, right: "MOD. 92FS-CAL. 9mm Parabellum - PATENTED" (92FS) vs "ASSY xxxxxxx-65490" (M9)
- Slide, left: "BERETTA U.S.A. CORP. ACKK, MD-MADE IN USA" (92FS) vs "U.S. 9mm M9-BERETTA U.S.A.-65490" (M9)
- Retail packaging: blue pistol case (92FS) vs cardboard box with styrofoam (M9)
- Barrel: proof mark engraved along bottom (92FS) vs assembly number (M9) [thanks to Ross]

* - Since there have been countless sub-variations, limited production runs, and older models, the following is worth mentioning to avoid confusion. Older production 92FS and M9s had more in common like straight dustcovers and more metal parts. Markings and serial prefixes have changed over time and are different still with Italian-made guns sold in the US. Current 92FS/M9 retail configurations can feature night sights and aftermarket grips. To keep it sane, this post only details the current and basic US 92FS and M9/A1. For some perspective, read Ross' excellent post below for more details and history.


Military M9*** (Pistol, Semiautomatic, 9mm, M9 / NSN 1005-01-118-2640):
- Metal parts: metal parts (older), polymer / polymer-coated (newer)
- Grips: factory Beretta (standard), Crimson Trace LG-402M (private or unit level purchase)
- Grip screws: slotted grip screws (older), hex (newer)
- Manufacture: first M9s made in Italy, then manufacturing shifted to Accokeek, MD
- Sights: 3-dot, dot / post
- Slide, left: simpler "PB" oval logo engraving
- Hammer: assembly number engraved on either left or right vs plain hammer (civilian M9)
- Serial: no prefix (standard), except for M9s issued to general officers "GO-xxxxxx" vs prefix "M9-xxxxxx" (civilian M9)
- Issued mags: contract Checkmate, Airtronic vs factory Beretta (civilian M9)
- Issued holster: Bianchi M12, Blackhawk SERPA variants

*** - Military guns are subject to a tremendous amount of abuse and wear; parts could get interchanged resulting in variations. Privately-purchased parts being used on issued guns are possible. The 92SB-F (92F) was the initial model selected to become the M9. Those initial slides were all replaced with 92FS style slides as the 92FS became the new M9. Some M9s could possibly have those initial 92F frames and parts. Take a look at Muncie21's post below to see the difference between his 92F style M9 slide and the newer 92FS slide.


M9A1 (Pistol, Semiautomatic, 9mm, M9A1 / NSN 1005-01-525-7966 / USMC only):
- Slide and sights: standard 92FS
- Dustcover style: integrated Vertec / 92G-SD style 1913 rail
- Dustcover, right: read manual warning**
- Dustcover, left: serial no "BERxxxxxx" followed by "Type M9A1"
- Backstrap: radiused backstrap
- Magwell: bevelled vs unbevelled (92FS/M9)
- Grip: front / backstrap checkering vs vertical cuts (92FS/M9)
- Trigger guard: thicker front end and straight outer edge vs curved (92FS/M9)
- Retail packaging: two factory PVD sand-resistant mags vs two factory standard mags (92FS/M9)
- Price: MSRP $750 vs $650 (92FS/M9)

** - "WARNING: READ MANUAL BEFORE USE. RETRACT SLIDE TO SEE IF LOADED. FIRES WITHOUT MAGAZINE."

The slanted dust cover and radiused back strap on the 92fs vs the strait dust cover and non radiused back strap on the M9:

*Pic from member JonDoe297



No warnings on the M9 frame:


92FS 3 dot sights vs M9 'snowman' style sights:



Assembly number on the military M9 hammer:


After being shot with seven rounds 7.62x39 and shielding his fellow marines from over 40 pieces of grenade fragmentation, then 1stSgt Bradley Kasal is assisted out of a room in Fallujah, Iraq still grasping his M9 service pistol. Despite loosing ~60% of his blood 1stSgt Kasal survived and received the Navy Cross for his actions.
Link Posted: 5/5/2014 6:26:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/30/2015 10:08:56 AM EST by M4A1Carbine]
Reliability
The average reliability of all M9 pistols tested at Beretta U.S.A. is 17,500 rounds without a stoppage.
• During one test of twelve pistols fired at Beretta U.S.A. before Army supervision, Beretta-made M9 pistols shot 168,000 rounds without a single malfunction.
• The Beretta 9mm pistol was the most reliable of all pistols tested in the 1984 competition which resulted in the award of the M9 contract to Beretta.
• Two-thirds of all M9 pistols endurance tested at Beretta U.S.A. fired 5,000 rounds without a single mal function or, at most, with only one malfunction.
• The average durability of Beretta M9 slides is over 35,000 rounds, the point at which U.S. Army testing ceases.
• The average durability of M9 frames is over 30,000 rounds. The average durability of M9 locking blocks is 22,000 rounds.

Factory 92 spring weights:
Recoil spring:
92fs: 13lbs
92c: 14lbs

Hammer spring:
92fs: 20lbs
92d: 18lbs

The recoil spring mainly controls how quickly the slide will recoil, a heavier spring will slow the slide down, a lighter spring will allow it to go faster. I added a heavier recoil spring to compensate for a lighter hammer spring (more on this below) and to put less stress on the slide while cycling. There is nothing wrong with the stock spring but unless you are shooting light, low power loads, there's no reason not to put in a heavier spring, especially if you lighten your hammer spring. The 92 Compact has a heavier recoil spring in order to compensate for the shorter and lighter slide. Your ammo will also dictate which springs are best, if you shoot a lot of +P loads, a heavier recoil spring will help absorb some of that energy. If you shoot a lot of light low power loads, a lighter recoil spring will ensure proper cycling. Beretta went with the 13lb spring as it does everything adequately.

The hammer spring puts pressure on the hammer which allows it to strike the firing pin when the trigger is depressed. A lighter hammer spring will put less pressure on the hammer and will have a lighter trigger pull. It will also effect how the slide recoils because the slide must push the hammer back during operation. So a lighter hammer spring will cause the slide to cycle slightly quicker. A lot of 92 shooters use the 92D 18lb hammer spring, it really helps the trigger pull. I have the "D" 18lb hammer spring and 14lb recoil spring and haven't had any issues with them.

Links
Articles and info about the Beretta 92:
Beretta 92 Family
Brief history and review of the Beretta 92
Movies and TV Shows with the Beretta 92
Disassembly and install videos
92 torture test
"Harder hitting" nonsense
SOF prefers 9mm

Reviews:
92FS compact review
M9A3 Review
Compact vs Type M
92FS compact review
M9 review
92A1 review
TTAB 92A1 Review
Beretta 92A1 vs Glock 17 Gen4
Wilson Combat 92G Review
Link Posted: 5/5/2014 10:12:44 PM EST
That is not a Elite 2. That is an Elite 2 slide on a M9A1 frame. There are pics of an unmodified E2 here: http://www.pistoleer.com/beretta-l/96g_elite_2.shtml
Link Posted: 5/5/2014 10:43:08 PM EST
Very helpful, thank you.
Link Posted: 5/5/2014 11:08:32 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SchlaffTablett:
That is not a Elite 2. That is an Elite 2 slide on a M9A1 frame. There are pics of an unmodified E2 here: http://www.pistoleer.com/beretta-l/96g_elite_2.shtml
View Quote

That's the kind of feed back I was looking for, thank you. Still looking for a few pics and if anyone has more info to add I'd be happy to add it.
Link Posted: 5/6/2014 11:48:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/6/2014 11:55:55 AM EST by SevenMMmag]
Didn't see the 92G-SD in your list. The "Special Duty" variant (aka Super Dave variant) was designed by Dave Harrington as his ideal Beretta 92. Basically combines an M9A1 frame with a 92G Brigadier slide, plus a stainless steel barrel w/ target crown

Also, remember that Beretta included -G and -D slides in a variety of different variants, mostly for special police contracts. The Compact L, Compact M, Centurion, Full size, etc frames all had various combinations of -G and -D configured slides depending on what the customer requested.


Link Posted: 5/7/2014 12:39:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/7/2014 12:45:23 AM EST by SchlaffTablett]
There was also an 92S-1 which was a S-SB transitional gun made for the M9 trials and then the SB-F and a 92F Type S. Both were transitional between the SB-F-FS.

The 92S should be 1978 IIRC. The 92 was introduced in '76 as a step slide gun. Somewhere between 5-7000 were made with that step before it was dropped for the straight slide in '77.

You should differentiate between the 92 Italian and 92 Brazilian guns.

You're also missing the 92 Stock.

Oh, and the 98 was also available in .30 Luger
Link Posted: 5/7/2014 12:40:11 AM EST
Awesome job! As many times as people come asking the difference between the models this should be stickied!

I really love the looks of that shiny Billenium model and the 92FS Compact L M9A1, must be the finish. I have a 92A1 and despite being big and heavy it shoots extremely well and makes a natural pointer.

Well done on your write up!
Link Posted: 5/10/2014 1:16:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/10/2014 1:23:04 PM EST by M4A1Carbine]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SevenMMmag:
Didn't see the 92G-SD in your list. The "Special Duty" variant (aka Super Dave variant) was designed by Dave Harrington as his ideal Beretta 92. Basically combines an M9A1 frame with a 92G Brigadier slide, plus a stainless steel barrel w/ target crown

Also, remember that Beretta included -G and -D slides in a variety of different variants, mostly for special police contracts. The Compact L, Compact M, Centurion, Full size, etc frames all had various combinations of -G and -D configured slides depending on what the customer requested.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By SevenMMmag:
Didn't see the 92G-SD in your list. The "Special Duty" variant (aka Super Dave variant) was designed by Dave Harrington as his ideal Beretta 92. Basically combines an M9A1 frame with a 92G Brigadier slide, plus a stainless steel barrel w/ target crown

Also, remember that Beretta included -G and -D slides in a variety of different variants, mostly for special police contracts. The Compact L, Compact M, Centurion, Full size, etc frames all had various combinations of -G and -D configured slides depending on what the customer requested.

Added, I hope you don't mind I used your description.

Originally Posted By SchlaffTablett:
There was also an 92S-1 which was a S-SB transitional gun made for the M9 trials and then the SB-F and a 92F Type S. Both were transitional between the SB-F-FS.

The 92S should be 1978 IIRC. The 92 was introduced in '76 as a step slide gun. Somewhere between 5-7000 were made with that step before it was dropped for the straight slide in '77.

You should differentiate between the 92 Italian and 92 Brazilian guns.

You're also missing the 92 Stock.

Oh, and the 98 was also available in .30 Luger


IIRC the 92S-1 was the original name for the 92SB. I'll add the 92 stock but you're going to have to help me out on the step slide guns and the Brazilian 92 vs Taurus?
Link Posted: 5/10/2014 1:26:48 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Brandi:
Awesome job! As many times as people come asking the difference between the models this should be stickied!

I really love the looks of that shiny Billenium model and the 92FS Compact L M9A1, must be the finish. I have a 92A1 and despite being big and heavy it shoots extremely well and makes a natural pointer.

Well done on your write up!
View Quote

Thanks! I agree love my new 92 Compact, just wish I could find a nice iwb holster for it. And my 92A1 is probably my favorite pistol.


If any one has pictures of any of the models I'm missing feel free to post them or IM them to me, it would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 5/11/2014 8:19:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/14/2014 4:05:22 AM EST by JRCmx]
Sticky Please
Thank You
Link Posted: 5/12/2014 11:13:39 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/13/2014 11:03:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/13/2014 11:03:35 PM EST by SchlaffTablett]
Here's a step slide 92. These were the first 92's produced.

Beretta had owned and operated a plant in Brazil for quite a while (how long I'm not sure) and made many firearms for their government including the PM-12 and others. When Brazil decided to get new pistols back in about 76-77 they chose the 92 with the stipulation that it had to be made there. There was a surplus of these early Brazilian 92's and many were brought into the US by a third party importer. These are arguably more common in the US than the Italian produced ones.

Brazilian guns can be distinguished easily from the Italian made guns as they do not say "Italy" anywhere on them. They have very simple roll marks to the effect of "Pist. 92 9mm" and "Beretta" and came in a yellow cloud motif cardboard box either devoid of "made in" markings or with the "Made in Brazil" razored out. Italian made guns will be marked "Pietro Beretta Gardone, V.T. 9mm Parabellum" and "Made in Italy" and shipped in Blue cloud motif cardboard boxes. Aside from the markings, however, the guns are nearly identical and have 100% interchangeability.

Anyway, The Brazil contract was a major multi year contract and not long after this deal was reached a similar contract became available in the US with the impending M9 trials. Beretta, to this point, had been using their own third party importers in the US (Garcia and Berben) and decided that establishing Beretta USA would be a good business move. Because the M9 contact also required M9's to be made here BUSA could act as not only as a manufacturer for the M9 should they win it but also for all of the pocket guns that since 1968 had been difficult to import. Once BUSA was locked in the decision was made to liquidate the factory in Brazil as there was no need for two plants in the Americas and the Brazil plant was closed. Because Brazil still required parts and service for their new guns Beretta sold off all of the tooling, plans, etc with the building so that parts could be produced. Taurus bought it and immediately started to make guns not only for the South American market but for the US as well. The original Taurus PT92 was a 100% copy of the original Beretta 92 as they were, quite literally, made on the same tooling in the same plant, probably by the same people. I have both a Brazilian made Beretta 92 and a 1st gen Taurus 92 and they even display the same tool marks and mold marks inside the grips.
Link Posted: 6/16/2014 11:09:41 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By M4A1Carbine:


The slanted dust cover and radiused back strap on the 92fs vs the strait dust cover and non radiused back strap on the M9:
http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m27/curse44/gunporn/m992fs.jpg?t=1259858223


View Quote


I made that image in paint shop pro in about 5 minutes, back in '06 or '07 because some cat was arguing on a forum that there was no difference between the two. It makes me chuckle that it still shows up on forums from time to time. :)
Link Posted: 6/17/2014 8:52:19 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JonDoe297:


I made that image in paint shop pro in about 5 minutes, back in '06 or '07 because some cat was arguing on a forum that there was no difference between the two. It makes me chuckle that it still shows up on forums from time to time. :)
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Originally Posted By JonDoe297:
Originally Posted By M4A1Carbine:


The slanted dust cover and radiused back strap on the 92fs vs the strait dust cover and non radiused back strap on the M9:
http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m27/curse44/gunporn/m992fs.jpg?t=1259858223




I made that image in paint shop pro in about 5 minutes, back in '06 or '07 because some cat was arguing on a forum that there was no difference between the two. It makes me chuckle that it still shows up on forums from time to time. :)

Well I'll attribute it to you then. I hope you don't mind me using it.
Link Posted: 6/18/2014 11:26:54 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By M4A1Carbine:

Well I'll attribute it to you then. I hope you don't mind me using it.
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Originally Posted By M4A1Carbine:
Originally Posted By JonDoe297:
Originally Posted By M4A1Carbine:


The slanted dust cover and radiused back strap on the 92fs vs the strait dust cover and non radiused back strap on the M9:
http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m27/curse44/gunporn/m992fs.jpg?t=1259858223




I made that image in paint shop pro in about 5 minutes, back in '06 or '07 because some cat was arguing on a forum that there was no difference between the two. It makes me chuckle that it still shows up on forums from time to time. :)

Well I'll attribute it to you then. I hope you don't mind me using it.


Oh I don't care. I don't need credit. I just laugh a little when I see it pop up, because I made it to settle an internet argument. :)
Link Posted: 5/15/2015 11:13:14 PM EST
Not sure about the picture you have for the Stock. It looks like a modified 92fs and not a stock.

A stock looks more like the picture you have for the combat. Stock has a front barrel bushing and different trigger guard, same as the combat.

A combat looks like this

http://i392.photobucket.com/albums/pp4/brycemorgan452/_MG_3026_zps604af619.jpg
Link Posted: 11/19/2015 12:29:21 AM EST
Does the 92G have an enlarged hammer pin?
Link Posted: 11/19/2015 12:48:37 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LIL-COMMANDO:
Does the 92G have an enlarged hammer pin?
View Quote

All current 92s should have the enlarged hammer pin. You can check by looking at the hammer pin on the left side of the frame, or for the groove on the bottom of the slide.

92F on left, 92FS on right.


Notice the groove in the 92FS slide that the hammer pin fits in.
Link Posted: 11/20/2015 5:58:36 PM EST
Great thread. Good job OP.
Link Posted: 11/21/2015 3:21:03 PM EST
Thanks, the 92G I was looking at is on gunbroker so was unsure of that model having enlarge hammer pin. I sent seller message asking but have not received response. My guess it does have it on current production guns.
Link Posted: 1/24/2016 12:20:41 PM EST
I have a 92S in Stainless or I guess what Beretta would call Inox. Did they use that word back then? I haven't seen any mention of the Stainless 92S anywhere and would really like to find a spare mag for it. The mag that I currently have and I presume is the factory mag is stainless or what appears to be stainless with a stainless floor plate. Haven't been able to locate another mag to match it. I'm sure a replacement 92S mag will work just fine and even a newer one as long as it has the cut for the mag release. I would just prefer to not have one with the plastic base on it. Can anyone direct me to a supplier? Thanks, Matt.
Link Posted: 1/30/2016 1:32:44 AM EST
-All 92s other than the 92, 92S, 92SB, 92F should have the large hammer pin.

-The Inox or stainless guns didn't start until the FS series. You have a nickel plated S. These were fairly common all things considered. You can use a newer production heel release cut mag and have it nickel plated to match.

I realized that I screwed the pooch earlier in the thread... The 99 was in .30 Luger; the 98 was 9x21 IMI. If I get a free few min I'll take a pic of my 98 for the tread. Also, the early M9's were actually small hammer pin F models. After the slide breakage issue, Beretta sent out a repair/mid like with a slide, large hammer pin, and new left grip panel. F series M9 slides already out there were also modified either by Beretta or DoD (not sure who) with the FS cut. These were marked with a small "C" on the underside of the slide forward of the cut to note they were modifications. I have some of these as well and I'll see about getting a pic.
Link Posted: 1/30/2016 6:03:28 AM EST
Great job.

The Vertec slide also has a dovetailed front sight.
Link Posted: 1/30/2016 11:45:07 PM EST
I have actually seen some mags that said nickel finish. Always thought that was kinda weird! Now I know why they were finished that way! Good info. Thanks a lot. Any idea on what they're worth in comparison to the standard black finish model 92's? Thanks, Matt.
Link Posted: 2/27/2016 8:06:47 PM EST
I posted this on the front page but not getting any answers. Maybe you or someone here can answer my question.

I have an Italian 92F and was wanting to put a new slide and barrel on it but am wondering if after the FS change in the hammer pin if any of these will fit the 92F frame.

Also if they would work, which would be better to have?

Thanks for your help.
Bob
Link Posted: 2/27/2016 8:23:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By AK-Bob:
I posted this on the front page but not getting any answers. Maybe you or someone here can answer my question.

I have an Italian 92F and was wanting to put a new slide and barrel on it but am wondering if after the FS change in the hammer pin if any of these will fit the 92F frame.

Also if they would work, which would be better to have?

Thanks for your help.
Bob
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A FS slide should work on an F frame, but an F slide won't work on a FS frame without machining the groove for the hammer pin.
Link Posted: 2/27/2016 9:04:15 PM EST
Thank you for your reply, I really appreciate it. Off to get an FS slide.
Bob
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