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Posted: 2/25/2006 7:36:54 PM EDT
On a G22 - how does the firing pin come out?
There is a plastic retainer at the back of the slide that I assume comes off, but rather than force it I would like to know the correct way to dissasemble. There are some metal filings (look like scraps from jackets) in the well and I want to pull the pin to give it a good degreasing and fresh coat of clean oil.

Link Posted: 2/25/2006 8:39:26 PM EDT
Look here, with pics even.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 9:17:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By watertower:
Look here, with pics even.



Thank you - this is exactly what I needed!
I easily pulled the retainer and pin, and cleaned all the crud out.
Made everything nice and clean, re-assembled, and dry fired for a bit to see that everything was in proper order.

Cant thank you enough for the link!
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 9:22:35 PM EDT
You're welcome!

Did you look at the info they have for the frame too? I printed all the disassembly stuff about 6 years ago and still reference it once in awhile, keep it stashed in the "gun filing cabinet" for those moments my memory fails me.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 10:00:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 3:18:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By David_Hineline:
If your striker channel is filling up with metal crap bits then stop shooting silver bear ammo.



98% Winchester White box.
1% Hydrashok
1% Golden Sabre

I wouldn't say it was filling up, but I noticed that there were a few specs of flakey brass colored metal bits in the channel. When I got it all cleaned up, I didnt find anything that would have interuppted operation...but I am a total clean freak with my guns. I have always been into precision, and clean every nook and cranny. Its not uncommon for me to completely break down a weapon once or twice a year (depending on how much it gets used) and polish every piece of metal.

Once I had the pin out, I wanted to put a brass brush on the catch that sites against the disconnector. It was kind of rough and I generally like to get that surface smooth to ensure a clean let off when I pull the trigger.

After I cleaned everything up the dry fires felt and sounds noticable smoother.
I plan to keep a count of how many rounds I go through before it looks gummed up again.
I would think I should be able to get at least 1000 rounds or better before I need to clean it like this again.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 5:06:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By David_Hineline:
If your striker channel is filling up with metal crap bits then stop shooting silver bear ammo.



Didn't you know It's fashionable to buy a quality pistol like a Glock and then run the cheapest, dirtiest, sub standard, steel cased ammo through it?
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 10:05:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BrianNH:

Originally Posted By David_Hineline:
If your striker channel is filling up with metal crap bits then stop shooting silver bear ammo.



Didn't you know It's fashionable to buy a quality pistol like a Glock and then run the cheapest, dirtiest, sub standard, steel cased ammo through it?



I suppose its a good thing that I never even heard of silver bear ammo.
On another note, I took my G22 out to the range this morning for a series of drills.
The work I did last night made a huge difference. Maybe it was psychological, but having the disconnector cleaned and having that channel scrubed out seemed to crisp up the recovery for follow up shots. Whatever the case was, I shot well with it today, much better than a few days ago!

I was so happy with the way this worked out now I will probably pick up another Glock for CCW. For a defensive weapon, I just havent found anything that is as perfect for 'point and shoot' functionality
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 6:07:03 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 3:57:35 AM EDT
Those metal scraps are probably the chrome coating that has come off of the firing pin spring. In order to avoid problems in the future, do like you are doing to clean the junk out of there. But do not put any oil or grease on your firing pin or the area it goes in. Your firing pin assembly should be entirely dry. When you put oil in there, it serves to collect dirt and gun powder residue.
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