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Posted: 2/3/2006 7:32:27 PM EDT
Hey guys. I was wondering which 9mm glock you guys like to use for these kinds of matches. I was looking into the G17, G34, and G17L. Does the longer barrel and sight radius (and wieght?) give you an edge, or do you guys prefer the more compact versions? This may be a noob quesiton, but I swear I did a search... Also, what kinds of after market options do you guys add? I've seen the trigger upgrades and match barrels and fancy sights, but you never know how much of that is actaully useful or not. Thanks for any info...

Couch-Commando
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 8:20:09 PM EDT
You probably want to consider a 40 cal model. 9mm will limit you to minor class which is usually not in your best advantage.

Aside from that there's not a huge difference between the suitability of the different models. Sure, there's a slight sight radius/weight/stability advantage to the longer models but its not typically the kind of margin that you win or loose on. If you are competeing at the level where those margins do make a difference you will have already bought, worn out, replaced, and upgraded half a dozzen guns and fired a quantity of ammo with a value 10 times what you've spent on guns.

If I were you I'd get a Police Trade-In/Factory Refurb G22. With the money you'll save over buying new, you can buy a Dillon Square Deal reloader. Access to more/cheeper practice ammo will make more difference in your competetiveness than an inch of barrel ever will.
Link Posted: 2/4/2006 2:41:54 AM EDT
Glock 35.
Link Posted: 2/5/2006 7:30:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gotm4:
Glock 35.



So, barrel length, sight radius, doesn't have a huge impact on performance for a non-competitive shooter, and .40 is the perfect round for major power factor. What about the matches that are just steel plates, whith no power factor qualification? Would 9mm work better because of the lower recoil?
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 1:26:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Couch-Commando:

Originally Posted By gotm4:
Glock 35.



So, barrel length, sight radius, doesn't have a huge impact on performance for a non-competitive shooter, and .40 is the perfect round for major power factor. What about the matches that are just steel plates, whith no power factor qualification? Would 9mm work better because of the lower recoil?



If you don't have a power factor requirement then yes 9mm would be better.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:19:41 AM EDT
Can someone explain what the power factor is and how it's measured in a match?

I'm dum
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:40:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/6/2006 3:50:01 AM EDT by gotm4]

Originally Posted By M4arc:
Can someone explain what the power factor is and how it's measured in a match?

I'm dum



It's bullet weight TIMES velocity DIVIDED by 1000. Minor must be 125PF or higher and Major is 165PF or higher, in USPSA Limited Major must be .40 or larger. Which is why .40 S&W is the most common caliber for Limited. At small matches it's basically the honor system. At a large Section or regional/State level and Natl's everyone is chrono'd. Usually you give the chrono guys a few of your rounds. They take a few apart and weight the bullets and chrono a few of the other rounds usually in your gun and then do the math. If you don't make Major, your scored as Minor which hurts you bad if you make bad hits on targets as Minor points down are greater than they are for Major. Check out www.uspsa.com

Link Posted: 2/6/2006 2:33:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Couch-Commando:

Originally Posted By gotm4:
Glock 35.



So, barrel length, sight radius, doesn't have a huge impact on performance for a non-competitive shooter, and .40 is the perfect round for major power factor. What about the matches that are just steel plates, whith no power factor qualification? Would 9mm work better because of the lower recoil?



If all you have to do is ring the steel to score 9mm will work great. If you have to actually knock it over, there's sometimes an advantage to having a heavier load.

Uspsa calibrates poppers so that a hit with a 9mm in the center of the circular portion of the popper plate will fall the steel. There's no guarantee however that a hit lower than that on the steel will knock it over. A hit with a higher power factor round will allow you to drop steel with a hit in the lower half of the circle or even down on the stem of the popper.

Additionally, if its a course of fire where you have to shoot steel, move to another location and shoot more steel, you dont want to have to stand there waiting while a steel gradually goes over center before you take off for the next position.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:34:51 PM EDT
Thanks for the info guys... What is your guys opinion on the compensated barrels(the glock model, not after market muzzel brakes)? Do they work well?
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 4:23:30 PM EDT
Go with the 34. Cheap to shoot and works everytime. My all-purpose Glock.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 5:53:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Couch-Commando:
Thanks for the info guys...hat


They do control some muzzle flip, but its not something most people opt for. For competetion it either wouldent be allowed (IDPA), or it would put you into open class (uspsa) with shooters that had red dots, 24 round mags, and comps that REALLY REALLY worked.
Link Posted: 2/7/2006 6:01:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/7/2006 6:02:08 PM EDT by glock223]
There are some shoots where you cannot use a G34 or G35 due to the trigger pull being less than 5 lbs.

Or using sights other than what is offered from the manufacture of the firearm
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 1:28:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By glock223:
There are some shoots where you cannot use a G34 or G35 due to the trigger pull being less than 5 lbs.

Or using sights other than what is offered from the manufacture of the firearm



Thats usually IPSC outside the US. Dave Sevigny shoots a G34 here in Production and a G17 outside the US for this very reason.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 6:54:00 AM EDT
Those rules were taken from IPSC's website for an upcoming "Plastic Fantastic" polymer framed gun match this summer in Barry, IL.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 7:16:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gotm4:

Originally Posted By glock223:
There are some shoots where you cannot use a G34 or G35 due to the trigger pull being less than 5 lbs.

Or using sights other than what is offered from the manufacture of the firearm



Thats usually IPSC outside the US. Dave Sevigny shoots a G34 here in Production and a G17 outside the US for this very reason.



Not trying to start an arguement here, just want some clarification. So, if you shoot USPSA here in the states, you can shoot the 34/35? If so, thats awesome.

But if you shoot IPSC, you can't use 34/35? Are you familiar with the Plastic Fantastic? If so, I would greatly appreciate any and all info you have about this shoot, I'd like to give it a try.

Thanks
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 8:51:42 AM EDT
If you're shooting "IPSC" in the US, you'll be shooting under the USPSA rules. You'd have to leave the country before you'd find an actual IPSC match.
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 4:23:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wulfenite:
If you're shooting "IPSC" in the US, you'll be shooting under the USPSA rules. You'd have to leave the country before you'd find an actual IPSC match.



+1
Link Posted: 2/11/2006 8:21:03 PM EDT
Thanks guys, was starting to stress at the thought of having to switch guns, I like my 34 so much. As a matter of fact, am probably going to invest in a 35 here shortly.

Link Posted: 2/11/2006 8:35:20 PM EDT
It's hard to beat a G34
Link Posted: 2/12/2006 1:43:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By burner1:
It's hard to beat a G34



Kinda like a sore pecker, huh?
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 6:25:09 PM EDT
I've seen alot of feedback reguarding standard sized models and practical/tactical models like G34/G35, but what about the longslide models? Is there any advantage to the long heavy slide and barrel? I never see many of these, and I haven't heard any range reports from people using these in competition. I'm just wondering if this would work the best for practical shooting, or if it's juts too long. Thanks for any info.

Couch-Commando
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