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Posted: 12/27/2005 10:21:02 PM EDT
I just got a handgun last week. So far I have about 500 yards down range. Mostly standing aiming at a 6" diameter steel reactive target from 25 yards.

I can get 90% of my shots in a 3' x 3' box, but only about 5% of my shots will hit the steel plate.

How accurate do you guys think a person should be before getting a license?

Also, I would like to practice jam clearing drills, as well as reducing my anticipation of recoil. I was thinking about getting snap caps and randomly loading them in mags. Is there junk ammo out there that jams frequnetly? If I reloaded this wouldn't be a problem, but I don't reload, so...

Thanks!
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 4:58:05 AM EDT
I would consider acceptable proficiency for carry (and this is my standard and noone elses) to be able to get all hits on a sillhoette target at 25 yards slow fire, 4-5" group at 7 yards slow fire, and 12" group at 7 yards doing rapid fire/double taps.

What I would be more concerned about instead of shot placement though is safe weapons handling. Are you ALWAYS aware of your muzzle direction? Is your finger on the trigger ONLY when you're on target, and off the trigger while doing reloads, drawing and holstering, etc? These are far more important than shot placement.

Think about this: If you were shooting next to someone at the range, would you rather shoot next to a guy that was all over the paper at 7 yards but meticulous about keeping the barrel down range, and handling the weapon safely, or next to a guy that can shoot a ragged hole at 7 yards, but sweeps people as he shoots or has his finger on the trigger when loading, etc?

Safety first! Accuracy will come with practice.

As for your second question, yes failure drills are a very useful skill. I would not seek out shitty ammo to do this though, because ammo that repeatedly misfires shows poor quality control, to the point that you could have a double powder charge, or a squib (primer, no powder, bullet gets stuck in barrel, next round gun goes kaboom). Use dummy rounds. Have someone else load your mags to the order is a surprise.

This is also a good drill to see if you're flinching. Your barrel and sights should not move when you pull the trigger on an empty chamber and the gun goes click.

It sounds like you realize that carrying a loaded firearm in public is a big responsibility, and something that should be taken seriously. Check your local range to see if they have any training programs. You'd be amazed what a couple hours with a good instructor in a one-on-one situation or a few hours of supervised range time in a group will do for your skillset. It's worth every penny!

Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:04:14 AM EDT
IN Texas, 75% is all that's required.

Texas DPS CHL target has a max score of 250, but 175 or above passes the CHL class.

Mike

ps - Instructors on the other hand must take the test twice (once w/ revolver, once w/ semi-auto) and score 90% on both or 240 outta 250.

Course of fire here is:

20 rounds = 3 yards
20 rounds = 7 yards
10 rounds = 15 yards
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 5:04:45 AM EDT
Try to hold 1 MOA and you'll be good to go!
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 11:05:26 AM EDT
My advice would be that you practice being accurate while shooting "combat style." A lot of people use target shooting technique and shoot great, but aren't prepared for a real combat situation.

Combat shooting has different requirements. You want your stance to be stable in all directions in the event of physical contact (like a fighter's stance.) You want to squeeze the gun very tightly in practice, because in combat your adrenaline will cause you to do the same. You want to get away from shooting with the tip of your finger and get that first knuckle in there. You will likely shoot one handed for at least your first shot, because you won't have time to get your support hand up or it may be preoccupied with something else (like keeping your balance as you move rapidly or fending off an attacker.)

Practice bringing your gun from a holster or from low ready, acquiring a sight picture, and double tappingh at 7 yards. Personally, I don't practice with my CCW guns at much more than 10 yards. I shoot a few rounds at 15 just to keep my edge. Any further than that and I don't plan on engaging, unless I'm being shot at with a rifle.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 11:32:31 AM EDT
Practice, practice, practice, then depending on your weapon, get some snap caps or just dry fire. Practice trigger control and watch your muzzle when you sssqueeze the trigger. If you have a lazer, have a friend watch the dot when you fire to see how much you jerk your weapon. Again, depending on your weapon, you can load with regular ammo and +p just to see if you are flinching. Never use loads that jam on purpose!!! I'm sure some will say not to use std & + method, but if you are concentrating on seeing if you are flinching or not, it can help. The bottom line is Practice, practice, practice.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 1:39:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1000yds:
Practice, practice, practice, then depending on your weapon, get some snap caps or just dry fire. Practice trigger control and watch your muzzle when you sssqueeze the trigger. If you have a lazer, have a friend watch the dot when you fire to see how much you jerk your weapon. Again, depending on your weapon, you can load with regular ammo and +p just to see if you are flinching. Never use loads that jam on purpose!!! I'm sure some will say not to use std & + method, but if you are concentrating on seeing if you are flinching or not, it can help. The bottom line is Practice, practice, practice.



I would agree, practice and go shoot an IDPA match in your area. This is geared towards concealed carry, and is good practice for showing yourself how accurate you are. It is timed and accuracy counts, plus you will have fun. go to http://www.idpa.com/clubs.asp and look for a club in your area. There is always people there that you can get hands on advice from (the expert or master classified) that are more than willing to help.

A23577
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 1:39:45 PM EDT
I've been having fun practicing mozambique drills @ 15-20feet and am getting quite proficient in that myself :) I highly recommend practicing that.

I'm a little limited as to what I can shoot but that is quick, effective and fun.

When running it I start lower than the target then chest shots, head, then I go low again and repeat the process. I break my sight on the target and reaquire it. With 9 shots in a 1911 can do that 3 times, then rinse, repeat.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 2:38:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 3:36:13 PM EDT
Opesus - you are already more accurate than most (IMHO) that posses a license. For the purposes of CCW - accuracy is NOT the most important thing.

Understanding the law, safety, your limitations, human nature, safe weapon manipulation and several other matters come well before "accuracy".

As an example - Tacoma Mall

My understanding is that there was a 2nd armed civi that trailed behind but did not take a shot because he was never sure of his background - guess what? He is a smart man. For all I know he might have been able to hit a nat's ass on a square range but he knew enough about himself and the situation to just keep trailing behind looking for a shot.

There are many others from above that can be applied to the Mall incedent - but it suffices to say - take a class.

Good luck
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 8:41:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2005 8:45:28 PM EDT by rickbones]

Originally Posted By SGB:
Spend a few $$$ and take a three day class from a pro, I promise you won't be sorry. hooting


Big time second this statement. best thing to do is drills. pratice cover, drawing, and situational awarness. if you shoot at a bad guy and hit a girl half a block away in a crosswalk YOU ARE WRONG. I like target shooting but squaring up, breath control, and trigger control dont mean nothin in a close gun fight.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 8:52:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SGB:
Spend a few $$$ and take a three day class from a pro, I promise you won't be sorry.

Target shooting has nothing to do with surviving a gun fight.



Recommendations for south Florida?
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 4:10:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 4:33:53 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 4:07:42 PM EDT
I think everyone who has a CCW should take shooting courses on their own time at least once a year. More if they carry everyday. It would be nice if every CCW holder would practice as much as you. I have LEO friends that don't practice that much.
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