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Posted: 10/31/2003 4:03:48 PM EDT
So if it’s not officially called a Krinkov , what does Krinkov mean?

Thanks, J
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 4:12:43 PM EDT
Lil' commie gun?

good question.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 4:17:36 PM EDT
I dont think anyone actualy know, It's only know as that here in the US..
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 4:19:35 PM EDT
Hmmm...Krinkov...sounds like a Russian name....
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 4:42:14 PM EDT
Rumored to be a Mujahadeen nickname..
Kalnikov was the nickname for the full sized rifle... Russians nicknamed it Sutchka..."little bitch".
-C
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 5:07:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/31/2003 5:08:40 PM EDT by BillC]
what does JackoV mean? Couldnt resist..
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 5:40:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
Hmmm...Krinkov...sounds like a Russian name....



I can ask my Russian teacher on Monday if the names means anything at all.


Her grandfather worked with Kalashnikov on the original design.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 6:33:49 PM EDT
I am guessing it is partly the name/word "Kalashnikov" and then some other word mixed in.

so, what does rin mean?
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 10:19:02 PM EDT
I have read about two origins-

One is an Afgan nickname, as it was a prized war trophy among the Muj-

The other is that its the last name of the head designer.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 10:23:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chamberlin:
Rumored to be a Mujahadeen nickname..
Kalnikov was the nickname for the full sized rifle... Russians nicknamed it Sutchka..."little bitch".
-C



Sutchka refers to the Krinkov I assume. Does Kalnikov have any meaning?
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 11:52:52 PM EDT
Well I guess that makes my "western term" answer incorrect. I think Janes said that...
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 3:34:22 AM EDT
I've heard that it is a distinctly american term - Krinks was the first one to do lots of these conversions and so they became know as "Krinkovs". Just hearsay, though, dunno if that is correct or not.

Rocko
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 7:48:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/1/2003 9:48:38 AM EDT by CAMPYBOB]
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 9:44:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/1/2003 9:51:57 AM EDT by chamberlin]
Yea, sorry for the confusion... Suchka refers to the AKSU, coming from the Russian word for bitch which is "Suka" as many of you know.
Maybe Kalibr or Spade can chime in a give a better explination of the slang word...
Spade, Curious to hear who your teacher's grandfather was! (BTW, like your Boondocks tag line!)

As far as I know, Krinkov and Kalnikov have no meaning whatsoever, other than that to a Mujahadeen Aghani. There very well could have been a Krinkov named designer, but I couldn't find any reference to one in the few books I checked.. I always thought that Isby brought us back these terms in the late 80s....
-C
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 9:53:10 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 11:59:58 AM EDT
Oh yea, that Schmeisser comment always bugs me
when I hear it! Igonorance is bliss I guess...
-C
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 12:07:42 PM EDT
Slang, like calling a Thompson a CHOPPER?

Link Posted: 11/1/2003 12:46:07 PM EDT
I read that Krinkov was the name of the head of the design team in the book "Kalashnikov" by John Walters. It was in reference to the AKSU (Soviet 7.62x39 version).

My wife, who's first language is Russian said Krinkov is just someones last name.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 1:51:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/1/2003 2:03:00 PM EDT by chamberlin]
Stot, I know you are just telling us what you read, so please don't take this as a argumentative refute to you personally! :)
In that book, Walters says "apparently named" refering to the design team leader, AND that data was supplied by Ian V. Hogg.
Now, both Walters and Hogg have written some pretty decent gun books, but I tend to find all sorts of errors, wrongfully implied statements and genralizations in their text... not to say that you aren't going to find errors in any book of this sort, but to me,
this is still not proof enough for the name origin...I do think Walters is much more "AK"
knowledgeable than Hogg, whereas Hogg has a huge general firearms knowledge. We'll get to the bottom of this evenutally... I'd laugh my ass off it turned out to be Naples Fla Krinks
(yea right)!!
-C
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 2:19:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
of course, we are still a nation that keeps referring to the mp-40 as a "schmeisser", even though hugo had nothing to do with it! heheh!



I've always referred to it as a "Schmeisser" even after hearing that he wasn't the designer. I think if it's good enough for people who fought against them, it's good enough for me.

"Burp gun" is another good one, and it wasn't designed by the noted firearms designer Hugo Burp either.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 3:57:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
i would find it odd that a russian weapon would be known in the west by a name the ghosts assigned to it.



The Mig-29 Fulcrum is a Western name that we made up and the Russians kept as official...they liked the name. Kind of similar in theory.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 5:06:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 5:16:51 PM EDT
FWIW, I had never heard the term Krinkov before I came to the U.S.

It does sound like a Russian last name, but other than that it has no meaning in Russian.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 7:03:14 PM EDT
You mean to tell me that the Russians didn’t really name the Mig-21 a Fishbed
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 10:12:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JTR8541:
You mean to tell me that the Russians didn’t really name the Mig-21 a Fishbed



Hehehe, as most of you guys know the NATO designations for Russian "F"ighters all start with "F". Fulcrum, flogger, fishbed, flanker, fitter, fencer, foxbat, farmer etc... etc... "H"elicopters with "H"...Hind, Hokum, Hip, halo, harke, hook, hound, hoplite, etc...
Man, they must have a real serious group of people that sit around and think up these call signs....

Kalibr, you re-iterate what I have heard from other Russians as well...they just don't call it by the name "krinkov"... BUT, I also haven't met any Russian Afghan vets that recognize the name from Afghani usage either...
hmmm.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 10:55:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chamberlin:

Originally Posted By JTR8541:
You mean to tell me that the Russians didn’t really name the Mig-21 a Fishbed



Hehehe, as most of you guys know the NATO designations for Russian "F"ighters all start with "F". Fulcrum, flogger, fishbed, flanker, fitter, fencer, foxbat, farmer etc... etc... "
Man, they must have a real serious group of people that sit around and think up these call signs....
.




I always wanted to know who did it. Because of the "Faggot" mostly.

Reportadly the Russians hate most of the names we gave their stuff, and are offended by them (Fishbed, Flogger, etc.), but the MiG-29 pilots are apparently proud of Fulcrum. I'm not entirely sure why.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 11:23:13 PM EDT
Because Fulcrum is a cool name and Fishbed is Stupid.

Maybe it dates to a cold way psyops things to get the soviet pilots thinking that their aircraft are inferior to such machines as the Phantom, Crusader and Super Saber. Although calling the Skyhawk a scooter doesn’t really give us any foreseeable advantage.

-J
Link Posted: 11/2/2003 12:05:55 AM EDT
Maybe it was based on false information or a nickname made up by Western Intel Sources during the cold war?
Link Posted: 11/2/2003 1:26:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RichinCM:
The first Krinkov was made when a Russian tanker carelessly left his full size AK in the path of his T72. The first thing he heard was the 'krink' of his AK being squished and then he shouted 'off'! Of course, the term was modified to sound more Russian.



Link Posted: 11/2/2003 1:48:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JTR8541:
You mean to tell me that the Russians didn’t really name the Mig-21 a Fishbed



What chamberlin wrote is correct.
.
.
.
after doing a google search on my statement, most sites claim that Fulcrum is ONLY the Western term for it. But, I saw a Discovery channel show with a guy from Mikoyan saying they liked the name and kept it.
The searches say the real name is Tochka Opori though. Russian speakers please translate that name.
Link Posted: 11/3/2003 12:11:45 PM EDT
Okay, I asked my Russian prof about "Krinkov" and told her what it was.

She said that at first it sounds a lot like a last name. But in Russian there is also krikov (kpukob) which apparently translates as "scream" if I copied it down right (not part of my "active" vocab, not needed for the TEST IN THE MORNING! AHH!), and kriknoot (kpuknyt[soft sign]) which is "to scream". "To scream" types funny because Russian is phonetic.

Anyway, that the only thing she could come up with for Krinkov.
Link Posted: 11/3/2003 3:19:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/3/2003 11:12:16 PM EDT
I’m liking this Scream thing like the chopper, thunderstick and the arf.
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