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Posted: 3/19/2006 4:22:31 PM EDT
At what point in the AK build process would you refinish the weapon if using Norrells Moly Resin?

Given the characteristics of Moly resin, I am seriously considering coating the inside of the receiver as well as the feed ramps and the trunions pre mounting. Basically everything less the chamber/barrell, gas tube insides/piston, bolt ,trigger group and stocks.

Any input is appreciated..


Thx,,

John P..
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 4:41:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Edicut:
At what point in the AK build process would you refinish the weapon if using Norrells Moly Resin?

Given the characteristics of Moly resin, I am seriously considering coating the inside of the receiver as well as the feed ramps and the trunions pre mounting. Basically everything less the chamber/barrell, gas tube insides/piston, bolt ,trigger group and stocks.

Any input is appreciated..


Thx,,

John P..


Best bet is to do it after you finsh building it, and re-install the barrel.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 4:44:45 PM EDT
I prefer to refinish after test firing. If you need to file or make any adjustments, it may mar the finish. Definitely wait to refinish until the receiver and trunnion/barrel are together.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 4:51:15 PM EDT
Edicut,
I gave this a lot of thought and finally dicided to just wait on refinishing until I had test fired the rifle. I never saw any finish between the old receiver stubs and trunions. For the most part never have seen any rust either. On all of the high contact areas the finish will be worn off any way and if you keep your weapon well oiled it wont matter. I have never heard of an AK rusting away with any kind of care at all. On one occcasion I was very glad to have not finished the rifle as some reworking on the receiver rails was needed to get it running smoothly. I just wait and refinish with CermaCoat gun finish. It is a spray and bake paint that so far has held up to solvents and hard contact wear just fine. In the end these are just ratty butt AKMs we have put together to shoot the crap out of and have fun. Test it, paint it and shoot it. Wipe it out from time to time and oil it up.
Goose
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 5:31:35 PM EDT
Wow,, Thx for the quick responses and points very well taken.. Going to assemble and test fire, then I'll refinish..

Thx,,

John P.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 7:24:00 PM EDT
In the past, I've always refinished after I assembled and test fired but I'm now giving some thought to spraying the inside of the receiver with MolyResin before I assemble since it can be somewhat tricky to paint some of the hard to reach areas inside the receiver after assembly.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:27:45 PM EDT
That's what I was thinking originally as well. Moreso to cover the entire receiver including where the Trunions rub against the receiver. I might Moly the receiver before I actually fit the Trunions, then just moly the whole thing again after I fit and test fire. I figure that way I'll still cover more of the exposed metal even if I end up filing and cutting some away. Still like the simplicity of doing it once after test fire. Besides that seems to be the way the experienced builders have been doing it..

John P..
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 3:33:40 PM EDT
Cold blue your parts where they "contact" other parts. Finish the build to FIRING state. Test fire, adjust your front sites (NOW is the time to drift them).

Take the gun home and detail dis-assemble. De grease EVERYTHING. NOW you paint.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 8:27:15 PM EDT
Hi Trotsky,
Why do you recomend cold blue on the the contact parts? I am thinking that you are refering to the trunions and reciever contact areas. Cold blue will not protect against rust. It must be coated with some type of rust preventiitive in order to keep it from rusting. It would not cause any problems of course but what would be the advantage of this extra step? Thanks,
Goose
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 4:00:26 PM EDT
The reasoning....

Painting before assembly is GREAT if you have a LOT of patience... because you are going to need to double paint, and double bake your rifle. If you have that patience? Go for it - it's the very best thing to do,

Paint inside receiver (trunion contact points), outside trunnions, barrel tail (ever notice how rusty these get when you pull 'em?), Outside receiver under scope rail, BACK of scope rail, UNDER trigger guard points, OUTSIDE trigger guard points... you get the idea. Bake - assemble, then get ready to refinish :) Yup, you're gonna scratch something :)

Now - if you just blue the contact areas... Blue is not as good. BUT, after you refinsih & bake, you are going to slather those areas with CLP. Let it creep in. If it can not creep in? Neither can water. Not unless you shower with it :)

I'll admit - it's not as good as a twice baked AK - but its pretty damn good with a good kit. Observe the contact areas of your kit - were they painted? Generally, on the GOOD kits, they were just parked, then riveted.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:45:10 PM EDT
I see your point. Seeing as how cold blueing is not difficult or expensive it would be better than nothing at all. There is some cosmetic advantage as well in the final product. And no way do I have the inclination to do a double paint and bake. My wife is not to fond of my rifle baking days as it is. Thanks for the answer.
Goose
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 5:25:41 AM EDT
Cold blues usually contain copper compunds to give them a blue tint and actually cause rusting. The only one I've tried that doesn't cause rusting, actually prevents it, is Brownell's Oxpho-Blue. The phosphoric acid in it produces a rust-proof coating on the steel.
Not as pretty as a real hot blue but lasts almost as long if properly applied - multiple coats on hot (180 deg or so) steel. I prefer the paste form, not the liquid.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/Store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=1072&title=OXPHO-BLUE
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 3:44:18 PM EDT
Oh AMEN to what jjk308 just said.... I should have been more specific. Get the OXPHO blue. You are going for protection - not for a gleaming Spanish shotgun.
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