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Posted: 12/15/2005 5:53:30 PM EDT
I am still not sure how I will "finish" my build, I went to Gander Mountain today to see about pricing to parkerize, they want $120.00 per gun! I know there is molyresin, gunkote, and other stuff. I just dont know how to use them, I also heard some stuff about Naval Jelly, but what caught my interest is some automotive paint I can pick up at wal-mart, It's called duplicolor. It is actually engine paint, resistant to heat, solvents. Any thoughts comments or suggestions welcomed.

Naval jelly, after I put it on for a short period...then what? Would I be done?... Thank you all in advance for the help.
Link Posted: 12/15/2005 6:17:10 PM EDT
brownells alumahyde 2 works great and comes in lots of different colors.no baking needed.just let it cure for a week and your good to go.
Link Posted: 12/15/2005 6:51:16 PM EDT
use krylon bbq paint you will have better results
Link Posted: 12/15/2005 7:02:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bigmegina:
brownells alumahyde 2 works great and comes in lots of different colors.no baking needed.just let it cure for a week and your good to go.



+1

I'm doing a refinish myself and couldn't be happier with Aluma Hyde. Honestly, I didn't think it would turn out this good. I wanted to do Moly, but I don't have access to a blasting tank or an oven to bake it in. With Aluma Hyde, you just lightly sand, spray it on and hang it out to cure.

www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=1117&title=ALUMA-HYDE+II

Link Posted: 12/15/2005 7:29:26 PM EDT
Does Aluma hyde dry smooth? The few pics I've seen, the finish looks like it has a rough, textured appearance.
Link Posted: 12/15/2005 7:56:22 PM EDT
I only sprayed it yesterday but it looks smooth. It's not "smooth" like a new car but it looks great. I was sure to degrease it and then not touch it with bare hands prior to spraying.
Link Posted: 12/15/2005 8:30:40 PM EDT
Engine paint and other high temp/industrial paints are pretty tough but not always bulletproof to certain solvents. If they were resistant to chemicals I would use them. This is what I like most about moly resin. Easy and fast to use. You need an airbrush, resin and an oven. You can get airbrushes pretty cheap at harbour frieght I here.
Link Posted: 12/15/2005 9:57:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bigmegina:
brownells alumahyde 2 works great and comes in lots of different colors.no baking needed.just let it cure for a week and your good to go.





Does this come in aresol can, or do I need a sprayer for this?
Link Posted: 12/15/2005 10:44:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:
Engine paint and other high temp/industrial paints are pretty tough but not always bulletproof to certain solvents. If they were resistant to chemicals I would use them. This is what I like most about moly resin. Easy and fast to use. You need an airbrush, resin and an oven. You can get airbrushes pretty cheap at harbour frieght I here.



I'm a fan of molyresin too. Yep, when they're on sale, you can get airbrushes at harbor freight for $5.
Link Posted: 12/16/2005 2:24:29 AM EDT
I used DupliColor on my first build. I scuffed up the finish with scochbrite, degreased with brake cleaner sprayed with DupliColor, let dry then I baked in the oven at 400 for an hour and a half. The rifle came out great and the paint was only $5. I plan or this rifle to be just another truck gun so I didn’t want to spend a lot on the finish. I figure if I later get good results for some other finish I can always redo this one. Good luck with whatever you decide and post us some pictures when your done so we can see how it came out.




Sign_Wolfman
Link Posted: 12/16/2005 10:49:12 AM EDT
Wolfman, I hope mine turns out as nice as yours did. Great looking trunk gun.

I think I'm going to try the Aluma-Hyde II. Aresol can, dries quick, solvent resistance.......right up my alley.

Are there any downsides to using Aluma-Hyde II?
Link Posted: 12/16/2005 3:10:20 PM EDT
I bought a quart of Molyresin last February. I have refinished 12 receivers for myself and other people. In the mix was some barrels and top covers. I still have half a quart left. I was not stingey with the coating on anything. Baking was a breeze in an old electric convection oven that did all the baking. I have had no complaints from anybody as of yet. The only thing that screwed up a Molycoated finish was a band saw that cut up a fubared receiver. Do the math vs a sprayed from a can finish, I don't care how cheap.......

Originally Posted By tapeo1:

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:
Engine paint and other high temp/industrial paints are pretty tough but not always bulletproof to certain solvents. If they were resistant to chemicals I would use them. This is what I like most about moly resin. Easy and fast to use. You need an airbrush, resin and an oven. You can get airbrushes pretty cheap at harbour frieght I here.



I'm a fan of molyresin too. Yep, when they're on sale, you can get airbrushes at harbor freight for $5.

Link Posted: 12/16/2005 5:33:08 PM EDT
FloridaAKM,

Thanks for the input, I will def check it out. I am working on 3 polish underfolders right now and have a Romy and a couple of other guns I would like to refinish. Youre absolutley right about cost. I'll post some pics when I am done. Thanks again everyone and Merry Christmas!
Link Posted: 12/16/2005 5:39:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DWarner:
Does Aluma hyde dry smooth? The few pics I've seen, the finish looks like it has a rough, textured appearance.




It looks rough, but it's actually smooth to the touch and sprays on nice and even, but dont mess with it till it's done curing or it strips right off. Don't ask me how I know that.
Link Posted: 12/16/2005 7:19:50 PM EDT
I just purchased a can of the Duplicolor High Temp Engine paint #1200 from my local Walmart. It states that it's chemical and oil resistant, so I thought I'd give it a shot. Like Wolfman said, if it turns out not to my liking, I can always redo it with something else.

I've used Alumahyde on numerous other projects and can't complain about the product. You do, however, need to let it cure for atleast a week before you even attempt to touch and put the parts back together. You can try sticking the parts in the oven to help quicken the curing process.
Link Posted: 12/16/2005 8:42:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Instante:
Wolfman, I hope mine turns out as nice as yours did. Great looking trunk gun.

I think I'm going to try the Aluma-Hyde II. Aresol can, dries quick, solvent resistance.......right up my alley.

Are there any downsides to using Aluma-Hyde II?



i havent seen any downsides yet. After it cures apply some CLP and it will look even better. I used the dark parkerize gray color. If you want me to email a pic of how mine looks let me know.
Link Posted: 12/17/2005 8:54:02 AM EDT
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