Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 2/18/2006 12:09:26 PM EDT
Since we still have M2 .50cals in service and the potential for shooting WW2-era ammo in them, what is used to clean them up after shooting? Old stocks of GI bore cleaner? standard issue CLP? Soap & water?

Link Posted: 2/18/2006 12:13:21 PM EDT
My guess is that all the old corrosive stuff has either been surplused out, pulled down or burnt. I can't see the military sitting on 60 year old ammo when they could buy new.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 2:53:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL-01:
My guess is that all the old corrosive stuff has either been surplused out, pulled down or burnt. I can't see the military sitting on 60 year old ammo when they could buy new.



I remember reading several reports of our guys using 40's dated .50BMG when we first went into Iraq and Afghanistan as we had a bunch of it and it was still good.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:38:31 AM EDT
Haven't seen any corrossive, but pretty much the only thing in use is CLP.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:46:31 AM EDT
I shot up a bunch of 68 dated 762 in 2001, but that was not corrosive of course.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 4:42:59 PM EDT
Most guys cleaning the .50 wouldn't know the difference between corrosive and non.
FWIW, I always use Hoppe's No. 9 and CLP...
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 7:06:21 PM EDT
A shitload of CLP. In the States we used a solvent tank for cleaning them, but those aren't practical overseas on most areas.
CLP would work fine, since you are supposed to do like three cleanings to remove any traces of residue that worked out of the pores of the metal. Since weapons over there have to be cleaned almost daily anyway to remove the dust that builds up constantly, it's not a real problem.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 8:05:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
A shitload of CLP. In the States we used a solvent tank for cleaning them, but those aren't practical overseas on most areas.
CLP would work fine, since you are supposed to do like three cleanings to remove any traces of residue that worked out of the pores of the metal. Since weapons over there have to be cleaned almost daily anyway to remove the dust that builds up constantly, it's not a real problem.



Thats interesting to hear. I would not expect CLP to work at all on corrosive ammo. I know Hoppe's #9 works for it as it was around since the days of corrosive ammo and so does the old GI bore cleaner. If CLP does the job, it would be great as I usually have a bottle of BF CLP in my range box anyways and I could to a quick cleaning of the bore before I leave and let the CLP soak and then do a full job when I get home with #9 and some copper solvent.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 8:17:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/19/2006 8:19:00 PM EDT by thedoctors308]

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL-01:
My guess is that all the old corrosive stuff has either been surplused out, pulled down or burnt. I can't see the military sitting on 60 year old ammo when they could buy new.



They are burning through a lot of .50 BMG, and are re-issuing WW2 era ammo.
I doubt the guys manning the .50s know the difference anyhow.
They prolly clean daily anyway, what with all the dust and what not.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 10:20:52 PM EDT
In early 2004 we were issued full belts of 1943 LC incendiary ammo for the convoy into Iraq. By early summer, we had 1990's production 1-4's.

I did like using that incendiary though.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 12:40:24 PM EDT
Mercury-based primer's leave a "salt" residue in the bore that absorbs water from the atmosphere causing rust if left in place.

These salts are water soluble, not necessarily solvent soluble. Table salt doesn't dissolve in oil, give it a try.

If your cleaner of choice mixes well with water, it will work fine. Acetone works well, but so does simple hot water.

An easy quickie, use Windex on a couple of patches. Then clean as usual.

Your basic chemistry primer for the day.


Link Posted: 2/22/2006 2:24:14 PM EDT
The barrels on the M2's are chrome lined these days anyway,right?
Hot water and soap is the best solvent for corrsive ammo.Windex works too,with a shot of ammonia which is an alkaline and will neutralize the salts from the primers too.
Personally I use Ballistol oil and water mixed 50/50 for corrosive ammo and black powder.Same reason but leaves an oil film behind for protection.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:57:25 PM EDT
I opened up 2 new cans of '44 dated .50 BMG in iraq, It shot like new ammo.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:03:31 PM EDT
The barrels are stellite lined, like M60 barrels, aren't they?
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 9:01:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/22/2006 9:01:50 PM EDT by First_LSK]

Originally Posted By Centauro97:
Mercury-based primer's leave a "salt" residue in the bore that absorbs water from the atmosphere causing rust if left in place.

These salts are water soluble, not necessarily solvent soluble. Table salt doesn't dissolve in oil, give it a try.

If your cleaner of choice mixes well with water, it will work fine. Acetone works well, but so does simple hot water.

An easy quickie, use Windex on a couple of patches. Then clean as usual.

Your basic chemistry primer for the day.




EXACTLY RIGHT !!!
Another great solution is isopropyl alcohol.



Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:23:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Sd_Kfz_182:
I opened up 2 new cans of '44 dated .50 BMG in iraq, It shot like new ammo.



What did you use to clean the .50cal MG with afterwards...CLP?

To all the others: you dont need to keep giving me advice about how to clean up corrosive ammo, how corrosive ammo works, or what not... I've been in the C&R hobby for a while and I am fully aware of corrosive ammo issues. My orginal intent of this thread was to find out what the soldiers are currently using to deal with corrosive ammo they might be issued just like Sd_Kfz_182 just posted. If its CLP, windex, water-ammonia, hot soapy water, old GI bore cleaner...whatever. So be it. Thats what I am curious to find out.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 1:45:46 PM EDT
'Mercury-based primer's leave a "salt" residue in the bore that absorbs water from the atmosphere causing rust if left in place."

No, even the corrosive primers are not fulminate based. Fulminate of mercury primers attack the brass, but not the steel. They went out about 100+ years ago.

Potassium chlorate was used in the corrosive primers. It leaves potassium salt in the barrel that is hygroscopic (absorbs water) and then causes serious corrosion.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 8:01:06 PM EDT
Spend money on what's important, save money where you can. H2O. I get a large window cleaner bottle at the .99 cent store (with window cleaner in it). Once the window cleaner is gone, I just refill with water. This I use for corossive ammo and my black powder guns (flintlocks). Works great, very cheap. I can remove the bolt of a bolt-action and just spray down the barrel, or use a small piece of rubber hose jammed into the chamber and spray down that. A few dry patches, then clean like any other rifle with whatever you wish. Don't forget the bolt face and firing pin (the corrosive is in the primer), or you will see bolt face etching in short order. The British had a metal funnel that was shaped to fit on the action of the Enfield rifle, and they would POUR hot water down the barrel. Then dry it, and use oil for cleaning and preservation. It seems the Russians had nothing and there are alot of Mosins out there with very dark barrels...

Lois
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 10:52:40 PM EDT
ive got 8 rounds of linked 1945 dm headstamped tracer ammo.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 11:05:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NoHarmNoFAL-01:
My guess is that all the old corrosive stuff has either been surplused out, pulled down or burnt. I can't see the military sitting on 60 year old ammo when they could buy new.



Half our .50 ammo in Iraq had 1945 and 1949 headstamps...
Top Top