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Posted: 8/13/2003 8:40:30 AM EDT
On my Bushmaster, the rear of the bolt (the narrow part where the firing pin slides in) is caked with some sort of black gunk. I could not get it off no matter what i did. It doesn't seem to contact anything, so it probably isn't a big deal, but I would like to get it clean nonetheless. Does any one have any suggestions?
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 8:42:54 AM EDT
how about a nylon bristle brush? brass bronze? steel?
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 10:31:14 AM EDT
I use a 3M "Scotch Brite" pad but I'm sure any generic versions would work. Punch a small hole in the pad. Apply CLP or whatever solution you like. Insert the small end of the bolt through the hole and while squeezing the pad around the tail of the bolt, rotate the bolt with your other hand. This should clean the tail and area up to the gas rings in less than a minute. DanS
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 6:35:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/13/2003 6:36:47 PM EDT by James_Gang]
double post
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 6:36:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thelastgunslinger: On my Bushmaster, the rear of the bolt (the narrow part where the firing pin slides in) is caked with some sort of black gunk. I could not get it off no matter what i did. It doesn't seem to contact anything, so it probably isn't a big deal, but I would like to get it clean nonetheless. Does any one have any suggestions?
View Quote
--------- This is typical carbon. You have two choices; Learn to scrape it off. Or invest in a good lubricant(not CLP) and keep this area well lubricated with a light coat. You will find carbon has a much harder time sticking to such surfaces when lubricated properly. In such a case it is possible to adequately clean this area off with a toothbrush or as one poster recommended a scotch brite pad. In the Marines we found an old bore brush to be effective in cleaning this area. However, it is my understanding that a certain amount of carbon fouling in this area is normal and will not inhibit the operation of the bolt.
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 7:28:08 PM EDT
i took mine off with a dremel with the wire brush bit
Link Posted: 8/13/2003 10:57:45 PM EDT
I use the mouth of an empty .30-caliber brass case. When it gets dull, I’ll square the case mouth with a file to restore the sharp edge.
Link Posted: 8/22/2003 9:02:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/22/2003 9:04:34 PM EDT by ryan163]
what about down inside the bolt?(the chamber the extractor and lug asembly slides into) on my rifle tonight i could not find a way to get down in there efectivly and clean the carbon opps never mind i found it http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=7&t=167888&w=searchPop
Link Posted: 8/23/2003 7:52:22 AM EDT
To clean the tail of the bolt: fine steel wool will whisk it right off. To clean the locking lug area of the barrel; Sinclair makes a very slick tool. Good luck. SD
Link Posted: 11/16/2003 3:22:16 PM EDT
Been over looking this area of the bolt. I'm pretty good about keeping my rifles clean but that area of the bolt caught me off guard now I'm paying for it!
Link Posted: 11/17/2003 7:41:10 PM EDT
In ROTC when we are cleaning the nasty nasty NASTY reserve units weapons we borrow to fire (ugh) we typically use the actual firing pin if we have nothing to really scrap it with. The best scraper is a dental tool. Pick on up... it gets any caked carbon off in all the difficult places of the bolt and the carrier(inside, outside) and can really get the crap out of the "star chamber" Good luck :)
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 10:51:00 AM EDT
If I have to scrape I use a razor blade. I like to submerge all the bolt parts in an old bottle of Hoppe’s for a week or so. Makes cleaning much easier; better living through chemicals. -J
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