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Posted: 10/29/2002 6:13:49 PM EDT
ive been trying to remove the top buttstock screw for about 2 hours. It wont budge. Anybody have any tips?
Link Posted: 10/29/2002 6:49:06 PM EDT
Sorry man. Mine just unscrews like normal. You could try propping the rifle up and letting some penetrating oil sit on top of the screw, but other than that I have no idea why it wouldn't just unscrew.
Link Posted: 10/29/2002 7:14:49 PM EDT
The screw is loctited.

The easy way is to get a big,big flat head screw driver, and use a wrench on the flats of the screwdriver to break the bond.

I will put the butt shock between legs, the lower receiver down against a towel on the floor, and use my left hand to hold pressure down on the screw and my right to spin the wrench(cheater bar)on the screw driver, to turn the screw counter clock wise.

It sounds like you using a standard size screw driver, and not the prybar size needed, and do not have the torque needed to break the bond.

Link Posted: 10/29/2002 7:24:54 PM EDT
If someone loctited it, may they burn in a firey hell. I had a handgrip that had loctite on it and ended up shearing off the screw. Had to take the lower to a gunsmith and have him drill out the screw....that sucked.

Lictite should never be used on an AR...PERIOD.
Link Posted: 10/29/2002 7:56:40 PM EDT
finally got it loose. all i needed to do was let some lube sit for a couple min. thanks
Link Posted: 10/29/2002 7:58:54 PM EDT
DigDug,
Remind me to never hand you one of my DCM rigs. Lets just say that the parts have some blue to them.

On some parts, like the float tube, I use loctite to keep the locking nut tight . I'm not saying that anyone should use the red(super glue)type, but the blue locktite does work well on keeping nuts tight that will self loosen.

P.S. Just how long am I going to burn in Hell, and will they let me take a glass of ice water?



Link Posted: 10/30/2002 2:57:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dano523:
DigDug,
Remind me to never hand you one of my DCM rigs. Lets just say that the parts have some blue to them.

On some parts, like the float tube, I use loctite to keep the locking nut tight . I'm not saying that anyone should use the red(super glue)type, but the blue locktite does work well on keeping nuts tight that will self loosen.

P.S. Just how long am I going to burn in Hell, and will they let me take a glass of ice water?






Blue loktite is ok....red you burn in hell. That damn handgrip screw was slathered in red crap.....ggrrrrr.
Link Posted: 10/30/2002 8:57:39 PM EDT
You just got to love it when they use red loctite to hold on pieces of plastic.

Normal, if the screw is holding metal, then you can apply heat to break the bond. But on the butt stock and the grip, you try that trick and you end up destroying the plastic, even if you use a steel rod to transfer the heat.

I wouldn't say that they need to go to a burning hell, just butt(rifle) rubbed to drop them, then a good old duck stomping to finish the task. One round of this, and they will be so gun shy of the red loctite, they will convulse just reaching for the it.
No need to waste a good smith, just need to be a little more abusive with the shock collar to get them trained right.

Link Posted: 10/31/2002 7:22:00 AM EDT
Mark, good to hear that you got it loose. That screw does normally have a spot of LocTite applied to it.

LocTite is a terric tool for building accurate rifles. While it should not be used to make up for lousy fit, it makes a solid, stiff, never comes loose until you want it to bond between metal parts. I glue barrels to receivers, float tubes to recievers and barrels, and front sight housings to barrels. And I can take them apart by judicious use of a blow drier. I do NOT glue the lock ring to the float tube. I glue carrier weights into carriers using epoxy, and have removed them with a heat gun as well. No big deal.

The easiest way to get some heat on a screw that has been either loctited or rusted, but is in a spot where heat sensitive stuff is also exposed is with a soldering iron and a bit of solder, but no flux. The screw will warm up, the plastic can be spared, and the loctite, epoxy, fingernail polish or whatever was used to glue it in place takes a beating and lets go. Just make sure to wick off the solder when you lift off the soldering iron. If the stock does get some damage that way, you can easily repair it with epoxy putty with graphite powder mixed in.
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