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Posted: 4/3/2006 9:31:03 AM EDT
I was doing some reading and the AR-15 book said to use red loctite between the barrel extension and the upper receiver. Anyone heard/ done this before? Does it not make it a PITA to remove the barrel?

Thanks
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 9:37:35 AM EDT
For some reason that sounds like a very bad idea..

Eh, and not to mention if torqued within spec.. barrel nut shouldn't loosen.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 9:50:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jonathon:
For some reason that sounds like a very bad idea..

Eh, and not to mention if torqued within spec.. barrel nut shouldn't loosen.




Not on the threads, on extension. On the treads would be nightmare. I used moly anti-sieze on the barrel nut/upper receiver threads.

Book said the loctite added strength to the receiver/barrel extension mate up?
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 10:03:17 AM EDT
I've never heard of such a thing, but I would definitely agree it could make a BIG PITA to remove the barrel. Sounds like another answer to a question nobody asked. If the military doesn't need red loctite there, I don't.

Gundraw
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 2:34:20 PM EDT
LocTite should be used on the threads of the barrel when the extension is installed. If you use it between the extension and upper, you won't be able to remove the barrel without damaging the upper. In the worst case the barrel nut will be held in place by the gas tube and will not come loose.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 4:28:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GlocksareGood:

Originally Posted By jonathon:
For some reason that sounds like a very bad idea..

Eh, and not to mention if torqued within spec.. barrel nut shouldn't loosen.




Not on the threads, on extension. On the treads would be nightmare. I used moly anti-sieze on the barrel nut/upper receiver threads.

Book said the loctite added strength to the receiver/barrel extension mate up?



From "the Ar-15 Complete Assembly Guide" by Walt Kuleck, Vol 2, page 118:
"Secret: To "fuse" the barrel and upper receiver, clean and degrease the inside of the upper receiver extension and the outside of the barrel extension. Coat them with LocTite 271 ("Red Loc Tite") before inserting the barrel extension into the receiver extension. Be sure to coat the barrel extension's flange and the very front of the receiver as well. When properly executed, the very substantial increases in the bearing surfaces of the OD's and ID's of the barrel and receiver extension adds a trememdous additional "capture" and support to both. The real beneficiary is the rather frail aluminum receiver, which must support the weight of the barrel, handguards, etc."

I do not see why anyone would want to "fuse" the receiver to the barrel extension? Maybe it is like the benchrest guys who epoxy bond the stock to the action,& action sleeve?

Jeff



Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:00:54 AM EDT
There is the quote. Thanks. Anyone else heard of this? His book seems to be pretty decent but the red locktite kind of made me go


Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:09:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2006 9:11:53 AM EDT by Luckdog]
If this connection was grease free when the red lock tite is applied you would probably have to heat the barrel and the upper till the red lock tite degenerated (burned) to get it apart.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:28:56 AM EDT
I like some of Uncle Walt's opinions, but like you I was quite perplexed at this statement. I guess Walt won't be removing a barrel once it is installed, ever? I dunno...but I do know I will not be partaking in this endeavor.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:31:39 AM EDT
RED loctite is only rated to 300F. Not a good idea.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:55:27 PM EDT
From "the Ar-15 Complete Assembly Guide" by Walt Kuleck, Vol 2, page 118:
"Secret: To "fuse" the barrel and upper receiver, clean and degrease the inside of the upper receiver extension and the outside of the barrel extension. Coat them with LocTite 271 ("Red Loc Tite") before inserting the barrel extension into the receiver extension. Be sure to coat the barrel extension's flange and the very front of the receiver as well. When properly executed, the very substantial increases in the bearing surfaces of the OD's and ID's of the barrel and receiver extension adds a trememdous additional "capture" and support to both. The real beneficiary is the rather frail aluminum receiver, which must support the weight of the barrel, handguards, etc."


It should be kept a secret. The "rather frail aluminum receiver" does not take much stress. This is BS. Ignore it.
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