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Posted: 3/28/2006 5:06:34 AM EDT
Does anyone know why some dies have both sides chamfered and why others have a "flat" side and a chamfered side?
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 5:11:05 AM EDT
Usually one side is chamfered (and marked "start this side") to make it easier to start the die on the round stock. So, this is the side you start first. I don't know why a die would be chamferd on BOTH sides as the usual procedure is to start the die on the side so marked, thread all the way to a shoulder if that is the application, then turn the die around and run it on again, this time running the unchamfered side all the way to the shoulder to finish the thread.

I hope this helps,

efxguy
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 5:14:26 AM EDT
Beats the hell out of me.
Never saw a die like that in my time at the shop.
Then again I was deburring 70% of the time
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 5:17:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By efxguy:
Usually one side is chamfered (and marked "start this side") to make it easier to start the die on the round stock. So, this is the side you start first. I don't know why a die would be chamferd on BOTH sides as the usual procedure is to start the die on the side so marked, thread all the way to a shoulder if that is the application, then turn the die around and run it on again, this time running the unchamfered side all the way to the shoulder to finish the thread.

I hope this helps,

efxguy



Yep it does help. That is what I was told and have done in the past. However I just bought a thread cutting die from Brownells (made in Japan, just regular HSS) and both sides were identical
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:12:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By metroplex:

Originally Posted By efxguy:
Usually one side is chamfered (and marked "start this side") to make it easier to start the die on the round stock. So, this is the side you start first. I don't know why a die would be chamferd on BOTH sides as the usual procedure is to start the die on the side so marked, thread all the way to a shoulder if that is the application, then turn the die around and run it on again, this time running the unchamfered side all the way to the shoulder to finish the thread.

I hope this helps,

efxguy



Yep it does help. That is what I was told and have done in the past. However I just bought a thread cutting die from Brownells (made in Japan, just regular HSS) and both sides were identical




Weird, though I suppose, unless you were threading to a shoulder, that you would get twice the life from a die by having two sets of starting threads, the part that gets the most wear. I guess this would be like having a double ended end mill, twice the life....

efxguy
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 12:44:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 12:46:05 PM EDT by eklikwhoa]
chamfer side to start
flat side to thread to a shoulder


i got the same die from brownells and in their new products catolog they show a thread alignment tool.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 1:27:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eklikwhoa:
chamfer side to start
flat side to thread to a shoulder


i got the same die from brownells and in their new products catolog they show a thread alignment tool.



I got a different sized die from Brownells (it's not for the AR). It's chamfered on both sides.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:51:36 AM EDT
So how do I cut to the shoulder w/o a flat side on the die?
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 6:25:26 AM EDT
Sounds like you need a relife groove cut next to the shoulder. If you can't cut a relife groove then run a drill bit larger then the thread O.D. (into the part your threading on), drilling it just deep enought to compensate for how far away your threads are from the shoulder. Counter boring the threaded part will do the trick if the part isn't to hard to drill.
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