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Posted: 3/14/2006 10:07:22 AM EDT
I recently got a Kel-tec PLR16 and I found the.223/5.56 to be a relatively cheap and easy cartridge to shoot.

This got me to thinking that I might like an AR15 rifle, especially since the magazines and all are interchangable.

I went to the Gun Show here in Mesquite recently looking and comparison shopping.

I spoke with someone selling complete reciever/stock and complete uppers who told me I could mix and match and could easily change uppers so if I wanted a shorter lighter general use upper and a bull barrel target upper I could have one lower and a couple of different uppers.

Now I cringe at the very thought of joining the Willey E. Coyote School of gun smithing and am not about to bring a dremel tool anywhere near something costing me 500 or more dollars so I hadn't even thought in terms of DIY building an AR15. But I was assured that assembling one is more a matter of pushing pins into place and that no machining, Dremel tool or otherwise is required.

Is is pretty much that easy? I may not be the most mechanically adept person in the world but I've built and up graded my own computers so complexity of assembly isn't a problem as long as there is no machining.

At this point I'm leaning towards a RRA lower and I'm still shopping uppers. Any recommendations? Or would I be better off just getting say a Bushmaster?
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 10:16:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2006 10:18:54 AM EDT by Pyrodox]
If you're talking complete lowers and uppers, it's only a matter of pushing two pins into place. AR-15s are designed to easily break down into a lower and upper reciever without any tools at all. You can swap an upper onto a complete lower in a matter of seconds.

There are "80%" receivers that require gunsmithing, however aren't considered firearms therefore can be purchased without much red tape, and you don't have someone elses name plastered all over the side of your weapon. However, unless you're really into building up your own rifles, that's not for you.

But, yeah, pretty much buy a lower and slap whatever upper you want on there, then change to another upper in about 10 seconds.

ARs are fun as hell to shoot, too. I was trained on an M16A4 and I have loved them ever since.

RRA is a great company, and pretty reasonably-priced. I just built my CAR-15 from a RRA stripped lower and a Colt SOPMOD upper. Great fit and finish.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 7:15:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pyrodox:
If you're talking complete lowers and uppers, it's only a matter of pushing two pins into place. AR-15s are designed to easily break down into a lower and upper reciever without any tools at all. You can swap an upper onto a complete lower in a matter of seconds.

ARs are fun as hell to shoot, too. I was trained on an M16A4 and I have loved them ever since.

RRA is a great company, and pretty reasonably-priced. I just built my CAR-15 from a RRA stripped lower and a Colt SOPMOD upper. Great fit and finish.



Cool. People have a tendency to tell you something is really easy to do and that you can do it in 15 seconds. Very true with Glocks but it took me about an hour and a half to get my 1911 back together after the easy take down the first time.

Some things fall in the catagory of being real easy the second time you do them.

I'm seriously looking at the RAA lower with the M4 stock Texas Star Group has them for around 230.00 at the shows.

I'm looking for a reasonably priced upper 16 inch barrel 1-9 I'd like to put a muzzle brake or flash suppressor on it but I don't run down the range and stab targets so it doesn't have to mount a bayonet.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 2:02:45 AM EDT
There's a wide variety of uppers available, RRA sells complete uppers, as well as most other companies, so I'm sure finding what you want shouldn't be too hard. 16" is a popular barrel length, as is 1/9 twist rate. Most of the no-ban uppers will have a bayonet lug, but it doesn't really matter because nothing states you have to attach a bayonet to it... As long as your state doesn't have it's own assault weapon ban that prohibits them. If you're in Texas I think you should be fine with that.

Assembling the upper and lower is basically the same procedure you use while cleaning the rifle. You push out the takedown pins and the upper lifts right off. Then you can take the bolt/carrier out of the upper and clean everything very easily, then put it all back together. I'm sure if you asked one of the tables at a show they'd show you at least how to push the takedown pins and "shotgun" the upper and lower, it can all be done with no tools.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 8:19:22 AM EDT
I'm sure if you asked one of the tables at a show they'd show you at least how to push the takedown pins and "shotgun" the upper and lower, it can all be done with no tools.

I was told the onlt tools I should have are a soft faced mallet and a specific sized punch and maybe I should get the AR15 specific tool/wrench.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 2:09:58 PM EDT
Well Suzie...you're about to join the ranks of the "hooked fish" I fear!!! he
Tools and mechanical ability are really minimal. The real key is just attention to detail. If you've built computers, then AR's will be just as easy. Just take your time, read a lot here on this board, and enjoy.

Welcome to the board,

Pete
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 2:26:44 PM EDT
Here are some real good instructions:

Link at the top of the DIY AR forum
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 3:20:52 PM EDT
Hey I take offense to "Willey E. Coyote School of gun smithing"... It is ACME that provides all that crazy stuff, and no instructions....
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 7:31:13 PM EDT
Putting an Ar together can be as simple or complicated as you want to make it. My first one was a stripped lower and a complete upper. I installed the pins, parts, and springs in the lower, Then added a stock and new bolt and carrier and was done. The second one I put the upper together completely as well as putting all the part onto and in the stripped lower. Neither one took more that 1 and a half hours once all the parts were on hand. Both shoot very well. I am currently trying to decide if I should built a third with a new barrel assembly I have put together or just use it as exchangable upper. There are also enough people from the board in Texas, I am sure someone is near you if you need help or have questions. Also try the next Market Hall Show there are usually more vendors with AR parts and receiver to choose from.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 8:16:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By biotech1:
Also try the next Market Hall Show there are usually more vendors with AR parts and receiver to choose from.



Well gee the next Market Hall Show is like next week. I'll have to check my card balences on that one.

And just going to "look" is expensive. Last time I went to "just look" I wound up buying a Mosin Nagant that was really clean because it is one of my favorite guns when playing my all time favorite computer game "Call of Duty"

So I have to figure what I can spend before I go.

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