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Posted: 2/18/2006 3:12:35 PM EDT


I have read that you should not grease the buffer tube and recoil spring.

I have shot a couple of AR's that a friend owns and one was greased the other was not. I prefer not hearing all the noise in there on the dry one.

So is there any reason that I should not grease mine when putting it together?

Thanks for any input.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 3:51:42 PM EDT
just put some drops of clp in the tube, thatll quiet it down. dont overdo it.
Link Posted: 2/18/2006 4:28:37 PM EDT
wasnt there something about using white lithium grease to quiet it down? ive always used a pneumatic buffer so i wouldnt know what it sounds like.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 3:10:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 3:30:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/19/2006 3:32:46 PM EDT by MyakkaVice]
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Link Posted: 2/19/2006 3:32:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DaleK:

I have read that you should not grease the buffer tube and recoil spring.

I have shot a couple of AR's that a friend owns and one was greased the other was not. I prefer not hearing all the noise in there on the dry one.

So is there any reason that I should not grease mine when putting it together?

Thanks for any input.



When the grease gets warm it can run out or splatter when you fire.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 4:17:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 4:40:49 PM EDT
I thought a very light coat of oil (CLP) on the spring for general protection, but never grease the buffer spring or buffer, if it accumulates dirt and gets build up it can plug the screw hole and build up around teh buffer and then become "pressurized" because the air can't excape out...hence the short stroking like the previous poster noted.

Who besides me also likes the fact they can tell thebolt locked back after last round fired by the lack of "SPROIINGG" noise?

No Expert
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 5:08:05 PM EDT
keep it dry.



no need to put anything on it since its not needed and could only cause problems, dont like the spring noise? get a f'in bolt action or .22

Link Posted: 2/20/2006 1:05:32 AM EDT
Come on...it's a happy noise.

If it bothers you that much, try a small amount of grease. Test fire. It's your rifle, so do what works for you.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 1:43:52 AM EDT
I agree the sproiong is a happy noise, and it does tell me that the bold has locked back when emppty.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 11:03:52 PM EDT
its not the spring noise when firing that is bad. its the scraping sound when trying to chamber a round and observe noise discipline.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 5:35:55 AM EDT
Two words: Judy Butter.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:43:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Shadowsabre:
Two words: Judy Butter.



I went out with her in college!

Seriously, just wipe the spring down with a light coat of CLP. I use a patch lightly coated in CLP and start at one end of the spring running the patch around each coil till I reach the end. This is not to reduce noise but simply to protect the spring from corrosion. One thing I do apply to the buffer face is Tetra Grease. I like a very thin film there to help reduce the metal to metal contact.

I get a chuckle out of guys who say they sold their AR because of the “sproing” noise!
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 6:47:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MyakkaVice:

Originally Posted By DaleK:

I have read that you should not grease the buffer tube and recoil spring.

I have shot a couple of AR's that a friend owns and one was greased the other was not. I prefer not hearing all the noise in there on the dry one.

So is there any reason that I should not grease mine when putting it together?

Thanks for any input.



When the grease gets warm it can run out or splatter when you fire.



or on the opposite end, when it gets cold it'll gum up and really piss you off...especially if it's already 'splattered.'
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