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Posted: 1/11/2006 12:25:11 PM EDT
Can someone please explain how this works and how to use it? My buddy just bought o ne and I tried to make sense out of the manual but I didnt quite follow it. the guy that sold it to him told him the recticle automaticly adjust from 200-600 meters POA for POI. I think you have to adjust a dial on it for the correct distance, but the manual didnt really specify how this worked the manual said in auto range function the recticle automatically adjust for elevation shots 200- 600 meters but I can not see how the cross hairs would know what yardage the target was at. If anyone can shed some light on this I would appreciate it. Thanks
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 2:24:32 PM EDT
I don't have one but was going to buy one a while ago and researched it. On bushmaster.com, it says:

"By zooming the scope and framing a target of known size in the scope's reticle pattern, the rifle is automatically set for the range to the target."

So, I think what happens is the scope changes the elevation when you change the magnification/zoom so that your target fits into the reticle pattern. But, I've never used one so I'm not sure of the exact procedure used, just the general idea behind it.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 2:33:05 PM EDT
+1

It appears to work off of a camming action (hence camputer). You frame something of a known size in the ranging doodad, and while you are spinning the dial, it is camming on the scope mount so that the scope is actually elevating the muzzle of the rifle in relation to the sight line.

Cheers,

kk7sm
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 2:38:19 PM EDT
That sounds like a very imprecise method of aimimg if you are trying to shoot something smaleer than the brackets what do you do? What if there is nothing of a known size?
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 2:40:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
That sounds like a very imprecise method of aimimg if you are trying to shoot something smaleer than the brackets what do you do? What if there is nothing of a known size?



You guesstimate.

It's not much different than mil-dot ranging. You need to have an idea of the size of your target for that to really work as well. The only way around that is to use a laser rangefinder or the like.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 3:55:34 PM EDT
It sounds as if your elevation changes as magnififcation increases
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 5:31:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
It sounds as if your elevation changes as magnififcation increases



Precisely - the scope itself adjusts for the elevation. You just have to know the equipment enough to make an educated guess as to the range.

Either way, let me know how it goes - I've been really looking into these - I think I'd like to put one on an M1A and play with it a while.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 6:08:11 PM EDT
It's really not that complex, as I understand it.

There are many different bracket choices, (verticle and horizontal) each representing a different target size, (18 inches , 36 inches, etc.). You simply estimate your target size, zoom your target area to fit the bracket of that size, which automatically cams the scope elevation to accomodate for bullet drop. It is actually very accurate and precise. Understand, this is all accomplished after the scope is calibrated to your specific cartridge and sighted in properly at 200 meters.

Example: A coyote is standing broadside at an unknown range beyond 200 meters. I would guess a coyote to be about 36 inches long. I zoom the coyote to fit the known 36 inch bracket, whala the scope has automatically adjusted the elevation to accomodate striking the coyote.

Additionally, once the range is adjusted, a simple turn of a thunbscrew and I can zoom in or out further without changing the automatic range adjustment just made.

Once you get the hang of it, it is really quick and easy.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 6:24:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2006 6:25:03 PM EDT by Green0]
There is one generic cam in a camputor scope and you can ajust to a steeper or shallower trajectory by calibrating the cam to your bullet weight and velocity and slightly fine tuning it. The mount has a hinge at the front and the cam cams against a polymer nub against spring pressure on the newer camputors anyway.

Once calibrated the magnification number corresponded to the range, or bracketed reticle on set size target should put shots on target.

The guys in the Army (really old sniper qualified guys) who used to use the original higher quality leatherwood scopes say that the mounts wear out and then it gets hard to hit targets at more than 600yds. Apparently the scope is a good system when it's new as the US Army snipers had a lot of first round and second round kills out to 900meters in Vietnam with the M21/Leatherwood system.

I had one of the camputor scopes and the optics plain suck. The focus is preset for long range and so the scope doesn't focus well at high powers at short range (as it was never inteded that shooters shoot long range at high magnification anyway).

I really think you would be far happier with a Shepherd-- faster system, better optics, similar price range.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 3:27:45 AM EDT
Interesting, my optics are excellent in the scope I just recently received. Very sharp and clear. Short range focus is excellent. Was very easy to calibrate and sight in.

Prone to wear out?

I can see where professional military or law enforcement snipers who shoot daily or weekly, constantly training, might eventually get some wear on the steel cam and the scope settings. (I believe the cam ring itself can be easily replaced). Myself, shooting only a couple times a month, I doubt I will ever cam this thing more than a couple hundred times in my life, wear should not be a problem. The whole mount is built like a tank.



Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:19:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 6:19:45 AM EDT by MTNmyMag]
This is not my scope, its my buddies I am simply trying to figure it out for him I dont like the fact that you can not use 9 power magnification to shoot at 100 yards with out effecting your zero. I am going to advise him to take it back if he can.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:39:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
This is not my scope, its my buddies I am simply trying to figure it out for him I dont like the fact that you can not use 9 power magnification to shoot at 100 yards with out effecting your zero. I am going to advise him to take it back if he can.



White Rook 2348 said earlier:

Additionally, once the range is adjusted, a simple turn of a thunbscrew and I can zoom in or out further without changing the automatic range adjustment just made.

According to this, you can in fact zoom further without adjusting the ranging.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 9:12:28 AM EDT
Yeah if you loosen a screw and disengage the cam from the power ring you can zoom without changing zero, but it really isn't quick and I wouldn't really trust the cam not to move at all; The way I see it the way to use that scope is as intended-- keep the cam and power ring locked.

If you would call the optics on mine good you aren't used to $25 Walmart Tasco optical quality.

I know the Vietnam scopes were probably very high quality as they were high-end- the camputors are made in China or something and it's obvious the cheapest scope imaginable went into the design to allow for a cheap price with the complex mount.
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