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Posted: 11/17/2005 11:28:35 PM EDT
I am planing to take my ACOG with me on a trip from LAX to Canada on Saturday and was going to put my it in my carry on bag but I got to thinking that it might set off some alarms when it goes through the Xray machine, is that possible? Should I pack it in my luggage that goes under the plane?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Link Posted: 11/18/2005 3:56:55 AM EDT
would like to know as well.



i have had an acog shipped to me next day before and it arrived fine.
Link Posted: 11/18/2005 6:49:34 AM EDT
Don't worry about it. However, if you have serious concerns about it, or something happening to it, why not just mail it back?
Link Posted: 11/18/2005 6:51:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Stickman:
Don't worry about it. However, if you have serious concerns about it, or something happening to it, why not just mail it back?




though you cant ship firearm related items out of the u.s.?
Link Posted: 11/18/2005 6:57:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/18/2005 6:58:31 AM EDT by FightingHellfish]
I've traveled with an ACOG, both with it checked in baggage and as a carry on. I've never heard one question asked about it, although I always unlocked my bag, waited for it to clear TSA and relocked it. I would be more concerned about acquisitive TSA employees than anything else. Lost and stolen items from baggage has increased dramatically since TSA got into the luggage checking game.

I'm not sure about restrictions on firearms related items leaving the USA. Pehaps if you list it as an "optical lens", they might assume it was a camera lens. Of course, the ACOGs that I've flown with have always been property of .gov, if it was my personal property I might be less inclined to gamble witha $1K optic.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 11/18/2005 7:09:00 AM EDT
Due to the value I would be terrified to put it in the checked luggage. Stuff gets stolen all the time. Due to the size/shape I would be very hesitent to put it in my carry on and 'hope' it gets past the bag screners.

I think I would put it in its Trijicon black carry case and carry that on with me. Make sure the manual is in there so there is no question what the product is. Remember it is no more a part of a weapon that a sling is....it is an accessory....that's it.

I would be more concerned with someone thinking I was trying to sneek something on and by just coming straight out and saying "look I have this" you diffuse that situation.

As far as the tritium....the amount of radioactive material in there is so small I would not even consider it and if you say "hey here is this scope I have with me and it is radioactive"....I would bet you won't get it on the plane.

Link Posted: 11/18/2005 11:20:00 AM EDT
The tritium amount is NRC-exempt due to the small amount (100 millicuries or microcuries, I don't remember which off the top of my head.). Nothing to worry about. Not enough particle emission to activate any sensors.
Link Posted: 11/19/2005 6:24:31 PM EDT
Alls well I put it in my carry on and sent it through the Xray machine with no problem at all. They were more concerned about my lap top.
Link Posted: 11/19/2005 6:30:41 PM EDT
I flew with a TA31 before and it didn't cause any problems.
Link Posted: 11/21/2005 5:53:59 PM EDT
A lot of wrist watches have more tritium than the ACOG does. I've never heard of anyone being stopped b/c of their "radioactive" watch.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 9:14:47 PM EDT
I know this is an old thread, but I thought I might weigh in...

Tritium sights work because the of the radioactive nature of tritium. (duh) An atom of tritium is hydrogen gas with two extra neutrons, hence the "tri" in the name. When an atom of tritium decays, it produces a beta radiation particle (an electron), which strikes a phosphor coating inside the sight. This is much like a TV works, but with a different source of electrons. A stable atom of harmless helium is left over.

Here's the important part: Beta particles have very low penetration. They can be shielded by as little as a piece of paper, or tin foil. The glass vial and metal structure of the sight is more than adequate for containing the radiation. It is doubtful that you would even be able to measure the radiation coming from a sight.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:41:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PromptCritical:
I know this is an old thread, but I thought I might weigh in...

Tritium sights work because the of the radioactive nature of tritium. (duh) An atom of tritium is hydrogen gas with two extra neutrons, hence the "tri" in the name. When an atom of tritium decays, it produces a beta radiation particle (an electron), which strikes a phosphor coating inside the sight. This is much like a TV works, but with a different source of electrons. A stable atom of harmless helium is left over.

Here's the important part: Beta particles have very low penetration. They can be shielded by as little as a piece of paper, or tin foil. The glass vial and metal structure of the sight is more than adequate for containing the radiation. It is doubtful that you would even be able to measure the radiation coming from a sight.



interesting, I always had that teeny uneasy feeling putting 'radioactive' stuff near my head, now I feel better
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