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Posted: 11/18/2003 2:55:03 PM EDT
Anyone think that this new case would make a good platform for .224 or .243 dia. bullets. It should be able to give a boost in velocity for the heavy for caliber bullets. I ask this question because the 6.8 mm may be fine for what it intended but other calibers for this case may have benifits also. It will be hard to come up with any really good data for comparision until Remington releases the specs on the 6.8x43mm cartridge such as case volume and peak pressure rating. Lets hear your thoughts on this.

Joe
Link Posted: 11/18/2003 6:31:10 PM EDT
you may be right, but at this point I'm just interested in seeing the original version. Did you ever hear of the .22 tth? what case do they use for that? (Texas Trophy Hunter)
Link Posted: 11/20/2003 10:36:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/20/2003 10:41:56 PM EDT by wyv3rn]
Originally Posted By J-A-R: Anyone think that this new case would make a good platform for .224 or .243 dia. bullets. It should be able to give a boost in velocity for the heavy for caliber bullets. I ask this question because the 6.8 mm may be fine for what it intended but other calibers for this case may have benifits also. It will be hard to come up with any really good data for comparision until Remington releases the specs on the 6.8x43mm cartridge such as case volume and peak pressure rating. Lets hear your thoughts on this. Joe
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That's an excellent idea. I wouldn't be suprised if you could push a 77gr Nosler or 75gr hornady down a 16" bore @ 3100fps - and easily at that. And this I am not even close to being sure about, but.. it MAY allow seating of 80gr+ bullets to magazine length. This would be awesome as the 80gr bullets have an incredible increase in BC, exceeding .400; retained velocity at distance would far exceed the 77gr.
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 1:49:42 AM EDT
JJREA: I remember reading about the .22 TTH some time ago and think it was based on the 6mm remington case but am really not shure about this. maybe someone else can be more helpful. If it is based on this case it's OAL and base Dia. would not be a good choice for the AR platform. Joe
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 2:09:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/21/2003 2:11:29 AM EDT by J-A-R]
wyv3rn: Exactly what interests me, only I lean more to the 6mm in bullets 90gr. and above and would like to try both 5.56mm and 6mm for a compairison. I am not suggesting 6.8x43mm is not everything they say it is. It just seems that marketing is geared to come up with something new the 5.56mm and 6mm bullets have already been done for the AR. It comes down to what roll you expect a case/bullet combination to Play, these longer bullets with better BC should be great for longer shots. Joe
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 11:05:14 AM EDT
One might be able to shoehorn the .224 TTH into an AR10, but your projectile choices would probably be limited due to magazine length restrictions. In contrast, the empty cartridge case would be almost too long to fit in an AR15 mag. The 6.8x43mm SPC case necked down for .224" projectiles would be close to the experimental .224E4 Winchester or even a rimless version of the classic .219 Donaldson Wasp. I'm certain that the latter wildcat has fathered a litter of caliber conversions ranging 6mm and above. Depending on the desired case taper, you could take it all the way out to .400" for pistol bullets, or .375" for some of the lighter rifle projectiles. (Starting data for the latter would look a lot like the .375 Super Mag used in silhouette competitions.)
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 12:27:12 PM EDT
dewatters: I had not considered calibers above 6.8mm but it gives some room for thought. The best part about this new case is it will give us more volume for powder charges and do all this in the AR15/M16 weapons platform. It will be very interesting to watch this new round take off and see how others adapt it to there needs.
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 4:55:04 PM EDT
I've been able to put a name to the 6mm version of the .219 Donaldson Wasp: the 6mm SM Wasp. The latter was created around the mid-'80s in an attempt to dethrone the 6mm PPC. A cadre of benchrest shooters had badgered Federal Cartridge Company into making a run of match-grade .30-30 Winchester brass just for this purpose. Besides using the ".30 American" brass to form the original .219 Wasp and the new 6mm Wasp, gunsmith David Tooley of North Carolina had planned to offer .25 and .30 caliber Wasp variants as well. David Brennan of [b][i]Precision Shooting[/i][/b] magazine had also suggested creation of a 7mm variant. The larger of the Wasp wildcats were probably inspired by Steve Herrett's early '70s wildcats for the T/C Contender: the .30 Herrett and the .357 Herrett. Both were formed from cut-down .30-30 brass, with the .30 Herrett case running 1.6" in length and the .357 Herrett case running 1.75".
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 1:37:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/22/2003 1:38:28 AM EDT by J-A-R]
dewatters: I remember when the Herrett's came out in the T/C. They were a good round for shooting steel Rams and had plenty of knock down power, also used on dear sized game with good results as long as the shooter did his part. These cartrides prove a very good point about adapting a case to a task, and the 6.8x43mm will be one of them in time. Joe
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 10:18:34 AM EDT
I have done some more looking into the 6.8x43mm, it is based on the 30 Remington case 43 mm in length. If you model this case for a 5.56mm bullet it should give about 5 more grains of powder capacity. With a horaday 75 grain bullet it should give a posible 200 more Feet per second, this is with 55,000 PSI pressure range. This only gives a idea of what you might gain and is not solid data, just thought you all might like some more info.
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