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Posted: 6/23/2003 5:45:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/23/2003 6:53:57 AM EDT by DaPhotoGuy]
I'm looking for a good deal on 62gr, brass cased, soft points (for hunting). Anybody have some suggestions on where to find it?
Link Posted: 6/23/2003 8:23:43 AM EDT
Check out the Winchester 64 gr. Power Point load. I don't think 2 grs will make a great deal of difference, but I could be wrong. The 64gr Power Point was developed for hunting. Don't use the Power Point Plus as it has the moly coating on it and once you start using that you should stick with it. Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 6/23/2003 8:30:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By firstar: Check out the Winchester 64 gr. Power Point load. I don't think 2 grs will make a great deal of difference, but I could be wrong. The 64gr Power Point was developed for hunting. Don't use the Power Point Plus as it has the moly coating on it and once you start using that you should stick with it. Hope this helps.
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Thanks. I saw that but it was so expensive. Was hoping to find something cheap that I could use for both three gun shoots and hunting. Don't think there is such a round is brass (Silver Bear has one but it is steel case). I think I'm going to buy 1000 rounds of SS109 for three gun and 200 rounds Power Point Plus for hunting.
Link Posted: 6/23/2003 6:36:20 PM EDT
About the only choices there is out there meeting hunting requirements (unless you are talking varmints) are Winchester 64 gr Power Point, the moly-coated 64 gr Power Point Plus, the Black Hills 60 gr SP and the new Federal Classic 64 gr SP. However, the Federal 55 gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw is a good hunting bullet also, as it is bonded and penetrates deep, while mushrooming well. I'd avoid that Russian crap altogether. Their SP loads are about the most junky looking stuff I have ever seen. It appears they cut off the tip of a HP bullet and dab some lead into the cavity. It isn't even smooth. Much of the lead tip comes back over the edge of the jacketing material. I could design a better SP load myself! It would surprise me if many of those things even expand. For the few boxes of ammo you will need for actual hunting, you'd be better off spending the extra $$$ getting something halfway decent. If you want a cheap load that shoots to nearly the same point for practice, get the Federal American Eagle 62 gr FMJ. It should give relatively similar ballistics to the various 60-64 gr SP's. -Charging Handle
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 12:37:38 AM EDT
The 60 grn. SP Black Hills ammo is hard to beat, Very accurate and deadly on Game and for only $18 per box of 50 in Gunstores. Also makes a very deadly self defense round.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:01:25 AM EDT
I was moving through a stand of junipers deer hunting and as I was going to be in trees I took my AR-15 with 55 grain soft nose bullets. I had a small 3X scope on the rifle. I moved into the trees and saw the head of a buck between the branches. I brought up the rifle and when I looked in the scope the cross-hairs were right on the buck’s head. I fired and saw all four legs in the air. When I got to the deer I found the scull had been pulverized. I could bring up the antlers and touch the tips together. One eye had been blown out of the socket and the eye ball was hanging by the optic nerve. The moral to this story is not to under estimate the power of a 55 grain bullet.
Link Posted: 6/24/2003 7:10:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Hornet28: I was moving through a stand of junipers deer hunting and as I was going to be in trees I took my AR-15 with 55 grain soft nose bullets. I had a small 3X scope on the rifle. I moved into the trees and saw the head of a buck between the branches. I brought up the rifle and when I looked in the scope the cross-hairs were right on the buck’s head. I fired and saw all four legs in the air. When I got to the deer I found the scull had been pulverized. I could bring up the antlers and touch the tips together. One eye had been blown out of the socket and the eye ball was hanging by the optic nerve. The moral to this story is not to under estimate the power of a 55 grain bullet.
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Better be careful with the assertion that you will always reach this outcome with a .223 and 55 gr SP. Had you used the same gun and bullet for a vitals shot at an angle, you would likely have seen all 4 legs in the air again....while the deer was running away! The 55 gr SP is not an adequate choice for deer hunting and is best utilized in the role it was designed for, which is varmint hunting. It offers too little penetration for use against deer. The .223 is really not the best choice for deer hunting anyway and this is only more true the larger the deer are. Sure, plenty of deer have been killed by a lowly .22 long rifle under ideal circumstances. But rarely are ideal circumstances encountered while hunting. I would hate to see the number of deer that have been wounded by ineffective caliber and bullet combos that ran off and died later after suffering hours or days on end. You never hear any of these stories told around campfires however, only the specatacular success stories. Again, if one chooses the .223 for use as a deer rifle, please choose a bullet that offers decent performance such as the 60-64 gr SP's. And remember, even with these bullets the .223 is really still a marginal choice for such purposes. As hunters, we should be concerned with making clean kills and use the tools appropriate for the job. -Charging Handle
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