Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 4
Posted: 2/16/2006 3:13:37 PM EDT
LARUE IMPROVES HANDGUARD...



While at Marks this afternoon I got the opportunity to mount up the latest version of his already excellent handguard with the QD sling swivel added at the insistence of certain Mil guys.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:20:02 PM EDT
Will this affect pricing?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:22:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Corporal_Chaos:
Will this affect pricing?



NO...Mil guys wouldn't allow it.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:22:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 3:28:46 PM EDT by mcgrubbs]
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:25:03 PM EDT
what is the insert made out of?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:27:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:
what is the insert made out of?



Stainless Steel as with all their steel components.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:36:04 PM EDT
Dammit, I bought an old one and had to pay for my own sling QD!
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:39:38 PM EDT
why is it at the back instead of the front?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:43:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MudBug:
why is it at the back instead of the front?



For the two point sling, which is, for me, one of the best.

Awesome. I want one!
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:46:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By austinwft:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:
what is the insert made out of?



Stainless Steel as with all their steel components.



I had thought perhaps it was the commercial Uncle Mikes insert... in the past, we have had some bad luck with the SS inserts in aluminum (in a maritime environment) due to insidious electrochemical corrosion. Do you know what steps have been taken to prevent this? Has it even been a problem in testing? Or just not recommended for maritime operations?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 3:54:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 3:55:39 PM EDT by redfisher]
Is there one on both sides?

never mind, just double-checked original pix

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:03:57 PM EDT
That's very cool...

I know and fully understand that "Mark" didn't do this for me, but I sure would have liked to have one on the other end where MY sling swivel goes... That would have been enough to push me over to the LaRue instead of a PRI for the GTS Recce/Rifle length forend I'm putting together. Very cool though.

I am a LaRue convert since purchasing an SPR-E. Amazing product.

Thanks for the info.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:11:14 PM EDT
Is this backwards compatible with the sling swivels that fit in VLTOR, Magpul and KAC products?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:11:55 PM EDT
Where/when can I buy one?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:13:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:

Originally Posted By austinwft:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:
what is the insert made out of?



Stainless Steel as with all their steel components. Machined in-house.



I had thought perhaps it was the commercial Uncle Mikes insert... in the past, we have had some bad luck with the SS inserts in aluminum (in a maritime environment) due to insidious electrochemical corrosion. Do you know what steps have been taken to prevent this? Has it even been a problem in testing? Or just not recommended for maritime operations?



No it hasn't and as with other LT products has passed independent Military Salt-Fog test.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:18:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mcgrubbs:
It is also modified to keep the swivel from completely rotating, so you won't have a carbine spinning around everywhere.



That would have been SWEET! I could have mounted a swivel on my tac gear, then spun the rifle around like I was ZZ Top playing a guitar!





Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:21:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By austinwft:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:

Originally Posted By austinwft:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:
what is the insert made out of?



Stainless Steel as with all their steel components. Machined in-house.



I had thought perhaps it was the commercial Uncle Mikes insert... in the past, we have had some bad luck with the SS inserts in aluminum (in a maritime environment) due to insidious electrochemical corrosion. Do you know what steps have been taken to prevent this? Has it even been a problem in testing? Or just not recommended for maritime operations?



No it hasn't and as with other LT products has passed independent Military Salt-Fog test.



What is your relation to LaRue?

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:23:20 PM EDT
+1 for Larue
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:26:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:43:18 PM EDT
Nice improvement.


Could DIY guys that have the older model get an upgrade kit later on?


Did they apply for patent of the new design?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:44:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By austinwft:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:

Originally Posted By austinwft:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:
what is the insert made out of?



Stainless Steel as with all their steel components. Machined in-house.



I had thought perhaps it was the commercial Uncle Mikes insert... in the past, we have had some bad luck with the SS inserts in aluminum (in a maritime environment) due to insidious electrochemical corrosion. Do you know what steps have been taken to prevent this? Has it even been a problem in testing? Or just not recommended for maritime operations?



No it hasn't and as with other LT products has passed independent Military Salt-Fog test.



Cool... I assume you mean 810F testing?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 4:45:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ian187:

What is your relation to LaRue?




As I have posted on other occasions I live near Mark and am a long time friend of his. I go by his shop for afternoon coffee and to use his shooting range as his guest.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 6:04:17 PM EDT
Do you know if this will be standard across the board for all his rails?

Spooky
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 6:10:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:

Originally Posted By MudBug:
why is it at the back instead of the front?



For the two point sling, which is, for me, one of the best.

Awesome. I want one!



Agree with Combat Jack!

The Vtac sling attached to this mod with the stock end attached to a single point sling plate (like KAC or whatever) is the way to go.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 6:10:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 6:26:34 PM EDT
Tag.
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:38:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
Dammit, I bought an old one and had to pay for my own sling QD!



Yes, do you think Larue will reimburse me the $35 I had to shell out for an adapter?
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:43:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2006 7:46:09 PM EDT by mcgrubbs]
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:48:20 PM EDT


That's impressive.

Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:48:32 PM EDT
and tag
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 7:56:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2006 8:22:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mcgrubbs:

Besides, who forced you to buy it??




peer pressure
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 2:46:38 AM EDT
You guys are doing this on purpose, aren't you?!?!?!?!
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 3:59:59 AM EDT
Im impressed with the ability to stop the sling swivel from rotating. Is LaRue the first to do this? Any chance of them coming out with just a rail mounted sling mount with this ability?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:12:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:

Originally Posted By austinwft:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:
what is the insert made out of?



Stainless Steel as with all their steel components.



I had thought perhaps it was the commercial Uncle Mikes insert... in the past, we have had some bad luck with the SS inserts in aluminum (in a maritime environment) due to insidious electrochemical corrosion. Do you know what steps have been taken to prevent this? Has it even been a problem in testing? Or just not recommended for maritime operations?




Can you explain why galvanic corrosion around a sling swivel insert is any more of an issue than it is around the barrel nut, receveiver end plate, etc.?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:20:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SinistralRifleman:
excellent idea...being a lefty I went with the two point sling route (via butchered 3 point slings) because standard 3 points have too much stuff hanging in front of the ejection port, and I never liked single point slings that much. Two point slings offer a lot of versatility.



So the placement of that swivel is solely for a two-point? Not familiar with that set-up...

Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:42:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By General_Tso:

Originally Posted By SinistralRifleman:
excellent idea...being a lefty I went with the two point sling route (via butchered 3 point slings) because standard 3 points have too much stuff hanging in front of the ejection port, and I never liked single point slings that much. Two point slings offer a lot of versatility.



So the placement of that swivel is solely for a two-point? Not familiar with that set-up...



+1 - Never heard of that mounting method... Can someone share pics?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 4:59:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By STG77:

Can you explain why galvanic corrosion around a sling swivel insert is any more of an issue than it is around the barrel nut, receveiver end plate, etc.?



Happy to... as you know the corrosion occurs when there is an electro-coupling between two disimular metals, the salt water (or air heavy with the same) acting as electrolyte... the two metal become an anode and cathode and the sacrificial process corrodes the anodic of the two... based on galvanic series.

The other parts you mentioned are mild steel parts and are almost always parkerized, stainless steel is not parkerized (can not be parkerized) and often is only chemically "dyed" black or left untreated -- without the benefit of an oxide coating to mitigate the state of electro-coupling, the corrosion process is MUCH faster... Also (depending on the type) stainless often has more measurable difference between the cathodic and anodic states fo the two disimular metals.

Furthermore, the barrel nut, properly installed with greased threads and torqued, is not nearly as victim to the incursion of the electrolyte air/water -- guns that do live in this environment will display signs of corrosion under the receiver extension tube lock plate from time to time though.

There is some evidence that inserted items, such as press nuts, zirk fittings and perhaps sling inserts also have the sort of fit that promotes the potential for corrosion, wherein the clearance around the suspect part is loose enough to allow for the incursion of wet air -- but tight enough to promote the electro-coupling and withstand the introduction of displacement chemicals and POLs -- yet not tight enough to be "self sealing".

Glad that you asked though...
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:03:04 AM EDT
Nice!

Now all we need is something up frount on on the 6 o'clock rail that will allow you to install a standard sling stud for use with bipod.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:10:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2006 5:19:01 AM EDT by mcgrubbs]
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:21:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mcgrubbs:

Originally Posted By Gunzilla:
There is some evidence that inserted items, such as press nuts, zirk fittings and perhaps sling inserts also have the sort of fit that promotes the potential for corrosion, wherein the clearance around the suspect part is loose enough to allow for the incursion of wet air -- but tight enough to promote the electro-coupling and withstand the introduction of displacement chemicals and POLs -- yet not tight enough to be "self sealing".



So then, is the .Mil Salt-Fog Test simply a measure to see how long it will take for this occur, or something else?



Never did get an answer as to the standard of the test -- but the name "salt fog" implied the 810F standard testing. This testing is more about seeing "if" it will occur, vice when it will occur.

The published standard for 810F specifically says that it is componenet testing and should not be used as an indication or testing of "small parts" (fittings, bolts, inserts, nuts, etc). 810F is also not intended to be used as a reliability test or service life indication, as it is only an accelerated test -- the biggest problem with these is that you can in no way create the synergistic effects that are a fucntion of time, when you are operating in compressed time. There is also the fact that no lab can recreate the "real world", test operators of accelerated testing are cautioned that this is not and "artificial fleet"

That said, the salt/fog test is probably about as close to a real world test and one can get... the next step is to just see how long they hold up after we start dunking them in the brine and hanging them up to dry

Bottom line, no one can tell the future... I am confident that if a problem arises, Mark will make it right.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 5:52:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 6:05:12 AM EDT
Are the inserts glued in?

This would offer some insulation properties, no?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:25:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AKM:
Are the inserts glued in?

This would offer some insulation properties, no?



There's probably a flange on the back side of the insert. The insert is most likely loaded in from the inside.

What locks everything into place is the main trunnion that is bonded in place with an elaborate locking pin design and specially picked adhesives.

Am I close Austinswift and Mr. Mcgrubbs?

wp
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 7:49:40 AM EDT
Bare aluminum parts must be anodized first before any steel hardware is attached. The acid baths used during the anodizing process will severely damage any steel parts. Anodizing prevents electro-coupling or electrolysis from occurring. This is not the first time steel inserts have been used in aluminum, the automotive and aerospace industries do it all the time.
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:18:35 AM EDT
How about a pic with the two point sling setup? Even with an oldfashioned detachable swivel. I'm a lefty as well, and have problems with a 3 point setup. Never seen what's being described here.

GH
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:45:52 AM EDT
So when can I buy one?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 8:51:20 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 9:03:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By General_Tso:

Originally Posted By SinistralRifleman:
excellent idea...being a lefty I went with the two point sling route (via butchered 3 point slings) because standard 3 points have too much stuff hanging in front of the ejection port, and I never liked single point slings that much. Two point slings offer a lot of versatility.



So the placement of that swivel is solely for a two-point? Not familiar with that set-up...




It's pretty simple. You run a shot sling from the rear of the buttstock to the rear of the handguards. It feels like a three point, without the long strap running along the length of the rifle. It keeps the nylon out from the ejection port of bolt catch, depending on which side you run your sling on. I first tried it briefly on an M4A1 I got to shoot in AZ, and found it to be incredibly awesome
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 9:19:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By misterjg:
Bare aluminum parts must be anodized first before any steel hardware is attached. The acid baths used during the anodizing process will severely damage any steel parts. Anodizing prevents electro-coupling or electrolysis from occurring. This is not the first time steel inserts have been used in aluminum, the automotive and aerospace industries do it all the time.



yes... but east is east and west is west, the last oil platform I was around was conspicuously devoid of cars, trucks and spacecraft...

It is done in the maritime environment as well, but not without the knowledge that there is an associated problem -- often the anodizing is damaged by the mechanical insertion of the fitting (does not take much) and there you go.

Rather than deny that such a problem can exist, why not just rest comfortably in the knowledge that Mark was concerned enough to have the product tested and things seem well taken care of?
Link Posted: 2/17/2006 9:34:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SinistralRifleman:

Originally Posted By Onslaught:

Originally Posted By General_Tso:

Originally Posted By SinistralRifleman:
excellent idea...being a lefty I went with the two point sling route (via butchered 3 point slings) because standard 3 points have too much stuff hanging in front of the ejection port, and I never liked single point slings that much. Two point slings offer a lot of versatility.



So the placement of that swivel is solely for a two-point? Not familiar with that set-up...



+1 - Never heard of that mounting method... Can someone share pics?



www.cavalryarms.com/CQTs-2.jpg



It is worth mentioning that mounting a sling this way makes it much cheaper than buying a 3-point sling. good old GI slings are cheap cheap.

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 4
Top Top