Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 10/8/2003 7:03:47 AM EDT
I was just thinking about this, and I was wondering about the implication of the AWB on pre-ban stocks....

The idea is that you can't have a telescoping stock on a post-ban rifle, but what if that stock was modified as to not extend/retract without first using some tools. It would seem like you could drill a small hole through the release lever and use a screw to render the lever useless (unless the screw was removed). Does the AWB address this ?

Trying to have my cake and eat it too....
Link Posted: 10/8/2003 7:42:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/8/2003 7:43:17 AM EDT by pulpsmack]
One of the most popular questions here... #1 you can do it assuming it's PERMANENTLY fixed in place. #2 you might as well spend your money on a REAL buttstock now then replace it with the adjustable of your choice in less than a year when the AWB expires. FWIW: Making your own stock doesn't put you in the clear 100%. There are many stocks made by companies that are every bit as compliant as the ATF approved ones, only they don't have the ATF seal opf approval on them. The chance is slim but You could get a hassle if the ATF deems your creation as one that is not permanently fixed. I suggest you get a Stubby, ACE Skeleton, a C1 or a standard A2 stock for now.
Link Posted: 10/8/2003 7:53:42 AM EDT
Yeah - I violated one of my own rules by not hitting search before flappin' my jaws. I wonder what constitutes "permanent" in the eyes of the ATF. Either way, I'll probably hold out and wait for the AWB sunset...
Link Posted: 10/8/2003 8:06:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Zhukov: I wonder what constitutes "permanent" in the eyes of the ATF.
View Quote
That is the $10,000 question - and one that has never been answered in writing as far as I know. For Barrels with muzzlebrakes its always required some sort of weld/high temp solder. You can't do that to a plastic stock with an aluminum buffer.
Link Posted: 10/8/2003 11:10:34 AM EDT
The muzzlebrake on my Rock River .223 upper is held on with 4 set screws. According to the l ATFE office in my neck of the woods, set screws are considered permanent if the rifle muzzle incorporates a recess or machined slot in which the screws fit into. Don't take this as the law of the land though; it could just be local office interpretation.
Link Posted: 10/8/2003 12:41:10 PM EDT
FB41, If you want a 'Tech interpretation' don't call your local office. Write to the Tech Branch - you will get a written reply as to the 'official' interpretation. Local guys don't know as much as they think they do... Anyway the 4 set screws are not considered permanent nor do they need to be. A groove with 4 set screws is fine for a post ban rifle. You only need to be permanent if the barrel is under 16" without the muzzle device (i.e you're using a 14.5" M4 barrel) and your using the muzzle brake to make it a non-NFA 16". The other time you need to be permanent is if the rifle is a post-ban but it has a threaded barrel - in that case the muzzle brake must be permanently attached.
Link Posted: 10/8/2003 12:55:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/8/2003 12:56:16 PM EDT by FYRARMS]
Originally Posted By FB41: [b]The muzzlebrake on my Rock River .223 upper is held on with 4 set screws. According to the l ATFE office in my neck of the woods, set screws are considered permanent if the rifle muzzle incorporates a recess or machined slot in which the screws fit into.[/b]
View Quote
Same here. Had a postban Colt 16" HBAR and had my gunsmith install a postban brake with 4 set screws. He said it was considered legal if it was not threaded.
Top Top