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Posted: 3/28/2006 12:54:56 PM EDT
How much is to low. For example most of the 55 grain .223 I use has ribbings along the round where it joins the case, shoul dall of the ribbing be visible? The reason I ask is I have a bunch of bulk ammo I purchased and some of it seems to be sitting rather low compared to other brands I have. To elaborate the rounds in question have the ribbings on some of the rounds all of the ribbing is visible on other rounds it is not visible at all. I compared this ammo to WWB and Federal 55 grain and both the federal and WWB were consistent in where the round was seated.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:29:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 7:29:55 PM EDT by KJCA3]
Thats the first question I asked that nobody had an answer for.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:43:15 PM EDT
I'd say you need to measure OAL and compare that to the spec. Bullets set too far back in the case can (at least in pistol calibers) lead to overpressure problems.

And those riibbings are called the "cannelure".
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:57:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FredMan:
I'd say you need to measure OAL and compare that to the spec. Bullets set too far back in the case can (at least in pistol calibers) lead to overpressure problems.

And those riibbings are called the "cannelure".



I figured ribbing was not the right term to use, What is OAL?

Thakns for the info

KJC
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:59:24 PM EDT
over-all length
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 8:27:03 PM EDT
The cannelures of the bullets aren't always applied properly, so you can't put too much faith in that, the Over All Length is what is important, as mentioned compare to other loads for guidance.

Bullets that are too far back in the case can be very dangerous, they could destroy your rifle and injure the shooter or bystanders.
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