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Posted: 3/27/2006 7:49:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 7:54:43 PM EDT by go4it]
Since the gun jammed I've got a few rounds with bullets too low in case. Can you fire them or should they be tossed?

Thanks in advance
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:50:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 7:50:55 PM EDT by M4A1OwnsYou]

Originally Posted By go4it:
Since the gun jammed I've got a few rounds with bullets two low in case. Can you fire them or should they be tossed?

Thanks in advance



Just toss them. Not worth the chance of a backfire. Ammo isn't THAT expensive.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 7:57:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By go4it:
Since the gun jammed I've got a few rounds with bullets two low in case. Can you fire them or should they be tossed?

Thanks in advance



Just toss them. Not worth the chance of a backfire. Ammo isn't THAT expensive.



What the hell is that?

Get rid of them. It "might" cause a overpressure.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:02:05 PM EDT
ditch them - too much pressure is not a given but the likelihood has increased.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:05:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TaylorWSO:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By go4it:
Since the gun jammed I've got a few rounds with bullets two low in case. Can you fire them or should they be tossed?

Thanks in advance



Just toss them. Not worth the chance of a backfire. Ammo isn't THAT expensive.



What the hell is that?

Get rid of them. It "might" cause a overpressure.



A KB =-P
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:57:12 PM EDT
Not worth the chance! 90% of the time you can fire them with no problem, however the 10% is not worth the risk! I was scoring for an individual 2yrs. ago who chambered one, and blew the hand guards off his gun. He was not injured, and the cock sucker got mad and threw his rifle down range (I never liked the guy!). I moved to have him removed from the range that day, but the match director let him stay.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 2:10:04 AM EDT
OK no more posted needed. I'll give the 2 shells a toss. Thanks guy's!
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 2:31:00 AM EDT
Ammunition which consistently gets it's bullet shoved back into the brass is ammunition best avoided.

This is a sign the neck tension on these rounds is weak and that the reloading machine on which the round was produced is in need of attention.

With semi-auto rifles "set-back" is a real issue and can occur at any time a round mis-feeds into the chamber.

YMMV, but should I find ammo in which this occurs more than a few times in a thousand rounds or so I would avoid it completely, as it just ain't worth the risk.

Be safe,
Mike
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 2:31:33 AM EDT
BUMP fire it underwater!!! and post pics!!!






of course im joking, but i have to say that because someone will come along and suggest i was not joking and i should be banned for giving out reckless advise.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 4:37:25 AM EDT
DO NOT FIRE a round when the bullet has has been pushed back into the case. If you can see the difference in the over lenght of the cartridge is shorter, then the pressure when ignited is going to be much higher then normal and that cartrige is already pushing 50,000 PSI.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 8:42:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 8:42:51 AM EDT by BLouie]

Originally Posted By nraluke:
DO NOT FIRE a round when the bullet has has been pushed back into the case. If you can see the difference in the over lenght of the cartridge is shorter, then the pressure when ignited is going to be much higher then normal and that cartrige is already pushing 50,000 PSI.



I'm curious about this and other comments regarding pressure. Please note that I am not advocating use of a damaged cartridge and I'm not a reloading expert. In the interest of seperating fact from fiction, this is my understanding:

Myth #1 - A bullet seated too deep increases chamber pressure.
It is my understanding that a bullet seated lower in the cartridge will effectively reduce the pressure rather than increasing it. This is because the bullet has more room to accelerate before it reaches the lands of the rifling.

Myth #2 - A bullet seated too deep increases the likelihood of catastrophic detonation.
Decreasing the unused space in a cartridge by seating a bullet deeper will DECREASE the likelihood of detonation, particularly in cartridges that are marginally filled with powder (i.e. many subsonic rounds). The rule of thumb I've heard is never fill a cartridge with less than 30% of the appropriate powder. Also, there are several reloads where the seating of the bullet results in compaction of the powder charge.

If I'm wrong, please say so and back up your information with credible sources. I get the feeling that many of the prior responses are based on unfounded assumptions.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 9:52:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 10:05:03 AM EDT by Coda]

...I'm not a reloading expert.


In that case please don't offer an opinion.

Case Overall Length (COL) plays a large roll in chamber pressure, accuracy, etc. Imagine a fire cracker inside a coke can. [Boom] can destroyed. Now same firecracker in a 55gal drum. The same can happen with too much COL. When the bullet ogive engages the rifling before the round is fired the bullet has nowhere to go (for 100th of a second anyway) and it builds tremendous chamber pressure. The idea is to have to bullet moving before it touches the rifling. This is the reason that every handloader should follow the max/min COL listed in the load data instead of listening to internet comandos. SAMMI is in business for a reason folks!

Detonation phenomenon is not completely understood even by internal ballistic professionals. Most "experts" tend to agree that detonation is more likely a factor of wrong type of powder than anything else. It has nothing to do with charge weight. In other words pick a powder designed for the round you are loading. By doing so you get the proper burn rate AND proper case fill. Compressed loads have no bearing in this discussion since they are a special breed and/or wildcat cartridges. The loads are intended to be compressed and designed from the onset with that in mind. Anyone who tries to created their own compressed load without the benefit of piezoelectric pressure equipment, chronographs, and special test barrels will eventually wind up missing one or more appendages.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 10:03:35 AM EDT
I noticed that the remington green and white boxes of 20, about 3 of them are always pushed further back than others, I have always shot them and never had a problem. you would think that their QC would be tighter if it were that much of a problem. I always inspect the rounds while loading them and just noticed that sometimes the bullets are deeper than others, I will keep shooting them.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 12:00:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/30/2006 3:35:10 AM EDT by go4it]
Cartridge was found and tossed.

Thanks guys!
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