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Posted: 3/23/2006 8:27:33 PM EDT
What is the reason that "chicken winging" is frowned upon when shooting? Less accurate? Less control? What is the best stance for shooting an AR?
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:30:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 8:31:03 PM EDT by fivepointoh]
umm well i think i hold the rifle w/ a sturdier approach w/ one hand on the front of the mag well and both elbows tucked in....also from a tactical standpoint which is gonna be harder to hit? a 2X4 or a 2X4 w/ another 2X4 perpendicularly attached to it forming a cross???......so 1) it gives the op less target to hit and also does not make you stand out as much and 2) i believe you can shoot and hold the rifle sturdier than w/ chickenwings......but those are just my observations
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:35:39 PM EDT
Much less stable platform and in terms of tactical shooting, shooting in a stacked column or shooting in a dynamic environment even more so. Your arms are more likely to be rendered unstable if they are hit by someone next to you, a wall, a spent casing etc. Thus altering your ability to keep steady aim. The idea is to streamline your core profile and index your elbow against your body.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:36:54 PM EDT
No chicken wing for me as I find it is not as steady and I don't want to present myself as a larger target.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:44:56 PM EDT
I don't chickenwing cause it makes you look like a damn fool.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:47:22 PM EDT
It is mainly a tactical shooting thing. As Adirondack mentioned, it helps you keep steady aim by keeping you from getting hit by something, but it mainly allows you to move more freely in a dynamic environment. When moving quickly through doorways while scanning for and engaging targets, it is very easy to accidentally smack yourself on door and window frames and the like.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:50:31 PM EDT
It better absorbs recoil and provides a stable platform while moving when your all tucked in. Its also more of a fighting stance.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:57:52 PM EDT
More aerodynamic
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:00:55 PM EDT
When you guys say elbows in, is the firing arm elbow pointing directly at the ground or is it slightly angled? When I just pick up my AR I find that my right elbow (strong side) points at a 30 to 45 degree angle at the ground. Is this normal or do you want it tucked completly against your body and straight into the ground? I find that position to put a bit of strain on the chest.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:01:02 PM EDT

More aerodynamic


And all this time, i thought that i was the only one who did my shooting in a wind tunnel
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:05:31 PM EDT
Holy Crap. I don't usually whip out a slide rule and a protractor. Just tuck you elbows into your body in a way thats comfortable (as if you were going to do for hours and hours and hours)
There is no perfect method in all this. Just good principles and a handful of good techiniques
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:07:49 PM EDT
And imagine doing it with a 35lbs vest on.m Kicks your ass
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:08:48 PM EDT
With an AR, there is no need to chicken wing.
Look at older shooters - look at the way they shoot an M1 Rifle.
Chickenwinging there for a reason.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:10:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sayeret-Tzanhanim:
Holy Crap. I don't usually whip out a slide rule and a protractor. Just tuck you elbows into your body in a way thats comfortable (as if you were going to do for hours and hours and hours)
There is no perfect method in all this. Just good principles and a handful of good techiniques



LOL, it was just an educated guess at the angle. So however feels the most comfortable then? Even though I know that I don't, I'm always afraid that when I pull up I will look like that guy chicken winging in the video where he damned near fell on his ass. I'm positive I don't look like that but I can't get that image out of my head of how fucking stupid that guy looked and it especially plauges me when I shoot.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:24:40 PM EDT
Just roll your shoulders forward. Not so its uncomfortable and tuck your elbows in agaiinst your ribcage. Not in a vise-like death grip but so its comfortable. Over time, it wil lbecome more natural.
Place your feet a little more than shoulder width apart, firing leg slightly behind no firing. And bend your knees slightly and lean forward slightly. This all helps manage recoil and you knees and legs absorb motion as you move. I shit you not, I had a old team sgt. making us assume a nice stable platofrm and walk 25m with a cup of hot-ass coffee at a brisk pace. You do that enough and you can see how to walk and not bob your barrel up and down as you do it.
hell, stand infront of a mirror for starters.
ST
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:31:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By viking57:
More aerodynamic




That's what I wuz thinking.

How can anyone claim to be HSLD with their arms sticking out?

Anyone who has ever ridden a motorcycle knows that stuff slows you down.


Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:22:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sayeret-Tzanhanim:
It better absorbs recoil and provides a stable platform while moving when your all tucked in. Its also more of a fighting stance.



+1.

Much more comfortable for me. I can't seem to find that right spot while "chicken winging" which is why I don't.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:25:08 PM EDT
Proper military stance for battle rifles is the chicken wing.



Only whimpy mouseguns do not require this stance.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:54:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Blackmagic94:
Proper military stance for battle rifles is the chicken wing.



Only whimpy mouseguns do not require this stance.



Assuming we're talking about competition shooting, well...things change. And if you think about the dynamics of shooting and muscle strain/relaxation. It just makes sense that you would want to relax your "chickenwing" to delay muscle fatigue. I was in the military after the M-14 was phased out so I don't know what they taught then. But it is not taught now. At least not in the Marine Corps.

If we are talking about tactical shooting. Chickenwinging has absolutely no place there either, for some of the reasons mentioned earlier. In contrast though it has nothing to do with muscle relaxation in tactical shooting. In fact you would actually be applying inward/rearward pressure to the weapon with both arms; "wringing the towel" as they say.

To sum up. Chickenwinging is not acceptable in either case. For different reasons.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 3:35:17 AM EDT
I've never heard it called that, yet my internal monoloque laughs out loud when I see it.

It's purely tactical in my opinion.

If I were shooting a long range range standing competition event, I would probably need BBQ sauce. I find that the front sight moves around a lot less with the elbow out. I'm speaking competition stance, shooting elbow up and non shooting elbow on my left hip and hand under mag or handguard. In my mind, the chickenwing has nothing to do with recoil management. It's actually quite a relaxed position, similar to being full draw with a compoud bow using a release. I can hold for several minutes without the shakes.

For anything other than long range, standing competition my elbow will be tucked, or rested on something.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 3:36:49 AM EDT
Better yet, why does anyone NEED to chickenwing?
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