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Posted: 3/23/2006 9:04:43 AM EDT
I am a virtual noob when it comes to reloading, as it has been over 25 years since I last reloaded. I am not sure how much reloading equipment has changed over this time, but I want to get back to making own loads.

I need help/suggestions deciding what equipment to get.

I want to reload .223/5.56, .30-06, 38 Special, 357 Magnum, .45 ACP, and maybe 12 Gauge shells.

What product(s) would be the best to handle the job efficiently? I am not too worried about the cost.

Also, who is a good supplier for quality inexpensive supplies of powder, bullets, primers, and such?

I also need a good reference for reloading, types of powder for various calibers, quantity, limits, and such. Please share your favorites.

Thanks for your help.

Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:44:42 AM EDT
Go Dillon or go home.

www.reloader.com
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:57:09 AM EDT
search for my thread : "help me decide on relaoding equipment"

i think it will help you greatly
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 9:58:32 AM EDT
get a midway catalog.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:03:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ArJunaBug:
I am a virtual noob when it comes to reloading, as it has been over 25 years since I last reloaded. I am not sure how much reloading equipment has changed over this time, but I want to get back to making own loads.

I need help/suggestions deciding what equipment to get.

I want to reload .223/5.56, .30-06, 38 Special, 357 Magnum, .45 ACP, and maybe 12 Gauge shells.

What product(s) would be the best to handle the job efficiently? I am not too worried about the cost.

Also, who is a good supplier for quality inexpensive supplies of powder, bullets, primers, and such?

I also need a good reference for reloading, types of powder for various calibers, quantity, limits, and such. Please share your favorites.

Last first...MEC 650 for 12 ga

Redding & RCBS for dies
RCBS for everything else

Dillion for mass quantities.

Midway, Powder Valley, Hi-tech ammo, Natchezz, etc, etc

Read this board and you will find a wealth of places to buy your supplies.


Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:32:05 AM EDT
You will have better luck asking this question on the Reloading Forum, under the General Tab, it's a very active forum.

Reloading Forum
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 10:40:59 AM EDT
Dillon for the rifle/pistol stuff. MEC for the 12ga. I also use the old standard RCBS for some stuff still.

At the current cost for shotshells, there isn't much reason to reload. Go shop Wally World sporting goods during dove season or when they're running a sale and you can get shotshells cheaper than you can even buy half the components for. At the current cost for shells, I don't bother with shotshells any more. Rifle and pistol are another matter.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 11:12:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 11:13:50 AM EDT by Coda]
I use a Dillon press for two reasons. 1) it works every time all the time. 2) If something goes wrong or if I break something I've got a lifetime warranty, no questions asked. Call Dillon, say, "I broke some stuff"...They send out replacement "stuff" the next day. Problem solved. Dillon calls it a "No BS" warranty for a reason. It's worth the pricetag.

If you go Dillon then you're looking at a 550, 650, or 1050 to reload both rifle and pistol. The SDB only reloads handgun and uses Dillons proprietary dies. You'll need a sepate press to reload shotgun rounds. No manufacture that I know of makes a press that does both brass and plastic.

Check out this reloading forum for some solid advice...
forums.1911forum.com/forumdisplay.php?f=58
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 1:20:07 PM EDT
'Dillon' is the answer for a press. The 550 is somewhat more cost effective and less elaborate than the larger 650. My press is 25 years old, a bazillion rounds thru it, and still good to go.
Dillon has proprietary dies, but they tend to be pricey. You will need their 'powder funnel', but you can use other brands of dies in the remaining stations. You should have separate bullet seating and crimping dies; easier to set up, and it just works better. Avoid anything by Lee EXCEPT their dies, which are quite good and reasonably priced. You can solve the extra crimping die problem by picking up a Lee taper crimp to go with the rest of a three die set; regular dies will work in a Dillon press with the exception of the powder funnel thingy, and the obligatory tool heads that make changing calibers relatively painless. You'll need shell holders for each caliber, and those are a strictly Dillon proposition.
Investigate the new spray on case lubes for your rifle calibers. Obviously you will want to load 5.56 in bulk, but don't bother with the '06 rounds unless you shoot a bunch of them.
You don't have to be a mech engineer to run a Dillon, but DO NOT allow ANY distractions while running a progressive. Be methodical and attentive, and you'll be fine.
Moon
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:52:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H-barCarbine:
Go Dillon or go home.

www.reloader.com




+1
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 3:57:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 3:57:48 PM EDT by LeeF]
I would strongly recommend Redding and Dillon. I recently needed to buy a repair part from Redding and after explaining the situation they gave it to me. It took two minutes to get a response from a real person. No waiting!
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 4:03:50 PM EDT
rcbs rock chucker 2
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 5:43:57 PM EDT
Lee Turret press. I reload mostly pistol calibers, but the turret helps me keep die settings consistent regardless of caliber.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 5:57:01 PM EDT
I've been using Lee for about 10 years now without any problems. The good thing is it's 1/3 the price of Dillon
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:45:47 PM EDT
Dillon 550B progressive press and RCBS single stage press. Best of both worlds.
Read, read, read, and read some more, then go forth and make ammo.

Remember, safety is no accident.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:51:47 PM EDT
I'll join the Dillon parade since I have been using a 550 for over 10 years. Here 's a breakdown
on what you need and real costs:

Here is a breakdown on reloading equipment:

Dillon Precision:
-----------------

Dillon RL550B & .45 Colt Conversion Kit 369.95
Dillon 3-Die Set 14405 55.95
Dillon Case Gage for 10.49
4 Large Primer Pickup tubes 16.95 **Lets you load up 500 primers
1" Dillon Bench Wrench/5 Pack of Die Lock rings 7.95
D-Terminator Electronic Scale 139.95
------
$601.24
Midway USA
----------
Frankford Arsenal Case Tumbler with Rotary-7 Media 89.99
Separator Kit 220 Volt International
Frankford Arsenal Stainless Steel Electronic Caliper 27.99
MTM Primer Flipper Tray Clear-Smoke 2.99
Hornady Powder Funnel 22 to 45 Caliber 3.19
-----
124.16

Total: 725.40

Reloading is an addiction. There are always new bullets to load.

Spambo
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 8:10:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wingman26:
You will have better luck asking this question on the Reloading Forum, under the General Tab, it's a very active forum.

Reloading Forum



Yikes! I've been on this board for 5 months and I have managed to completely miss the General tab and all the great stuff in there. Thanks.

Link Posted: 3/24/2006 8:19:55 AM EDT
Wow, thanks for all the great replies. The Dillon 650 looks llike the right ticket for me.

Link Posted: 3/24/2006 8:24:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/24/2006 9:29:40 AM EDT by ArJunaBug]

Originally Posted By halfmoonclip:
'Dillon' is the answer for a press. The 550 is somewhat more cost effective and less elaborate than the larger 650. My press is 25 years old, a bazillion rounds thru it, and still good to go.
Dillon has proprietary dies, but they tend to be pricey. You will need their 'powder funnel', but you can use other brands of dies in the remaining stations. You should have separate bullet seating and crimping dies; easier to set up, and it just works better. Avoid anything by Lee EXCEPT their dies, which are quite good and reasonably priced. You can solve the extra crimping die problem by picking up a Lee taper crimp to go with the rest of a three die set; regular dies will work in a Dillon press with the exception of the powder funnel thingy, and the obligatory tool heads that make changing calibers relatively painless. You'll need shell holders for each caliber, and those are a strictly Dillon proposition.
Investigate the new spray on case lubes for your rifle calibers. Obviously you will want to load 5.56 in bulk, but don't bother with the '06 rounds unless you shoot a bunch of them.
You don't have to be a mech engineer to run a Dillon, but DO NOT allow ANY distractions while running a progressive. Be methodical and attentive, and you'll be fine.
Moon



Thanks Moon,
That was an elaborate useful reply. I was curious about your suggesting I not reload 30-06, when I used to reload I did only 30-06 and 12 gauge. It was much more economical than factory loads. Is that not the case anymore? I realize the 12 gauge stuff is cheap nowadays, this is why I was only considering it. 30-06 reloading was cheap, but it was a long process. Why is it not viable now?
Juna

Link Posted: 3/24/2006 8:37:59 AM EDT
All presses break or have issues. People who buy Dillons have just as many problems as people who buy other presses WHEN THEY START.

Note most of the people are 10+ year reloaders. They are not starting out on a progressive, like you.

Lee makes good equipment. All the manufacturers share patents so none ore really ahead of the other.

Reloading gear is not like a pair of shoes... most people will try on shoes before they pay the $15 for them... yet will BLINDLY play $800 for a Dillon setup because they read it off a web site

Reloading is fun... if you are into precision acitivities.
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