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Posted: 2/27/2006 9:44:13 AM EDT
Is it harmful on the pin for ARs? I don't really understand how it harms anything since there is nothing in front of the bolt.

Anybody care to explain it for firearms in general?

You guys are probably starting to hate me by now
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 9:51:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 9:53:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Stickman:
Dry fire is a good thing with your AR15.



Please explain?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:02:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

You guys are probably starting to hate me by now



+1
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:04:14 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:16:16 AM EDT
Yes can someone please elaborate here id like to know myself ...
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:18:38 AM EDT
Some guns, it's not bad (unless you do it continuously).
Other guns, it's bad over time.

All guns, people will argue about it.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:22:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ti_27:
Yes can someone please elaborate here id like to know myself ...



Dry firing is good practice for Trigger control. It won't hurt your weapon.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:23:16 AM EDT
Go down to your local sporting goods store or gun shop and buy a snap cap and don't worry about it.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:28:37 AM EDT
I dryfire all of my weapons, sans the .22 rimfires.

--VT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:50:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By VT4meGunCtrlisAntiUS:
I dryfire all of my weapons, sans the .22 rimfires.

--VT



Why no .22s?

I have an old MK I and a Ruger 10/22. Neither of which have a bolt holdback/slide stop. They've been dry fired hundreds and hundreds of times after the last round. No prob.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:54:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By markm:

Originally Posted By VT4meGunCtrlisAntiUS:
I dryfire all of my weapons, sans the .22 rimfires.

--VT



Why no .22s?

I have an old MK I and a Ruger 10/22. Neither of which have a bolt holdback/slide stop. They've been dry fired hundreds and hundreds of times after the last round. No prob.



because the .22 is a rimfire and you can damage the firing pin against the barrel or gall the barrel to the point that it won't feed rounds.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 10:55:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:

Originally Posted By markm:

Originally Posted By VT4meGunCtrlisAntiUS:
I dryfire all of my weapons, sans the .22 rimfires.

--VT



Why no .22s?

I have an old MK I and a Ruger 10/22. Neither of which have a bolt holdback/slide stop. They've been dry fired hundreds and hundreds of times after the last round. No prob.



because the .22 is a rimfire and you can damage the firing pin against the barrel or gall the barrel to the point that it won't feed rounds.



Yeah, after looking over the setup, that made sense to me.

Just didn't look harmful on the AR.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:04:26 AM EDT
dry firing ARs is fine

most modern firearms are ok to dry fire

while lots say that rimfires should not be dried fired, i have dried fired my rugers all the time...no troubles
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:14:03 AM EDT
Thanks for the advice
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:19:35 AM EDT
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:29:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:33:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:34:35 AM EDT by _DR]
The only thing you really don't want to do is dry fire with the upper off the lower.
The impact of the hammer on the back of the magwell could potentially cause damage if done enough.

But for a completely assembled weapon it is perfectly fine to dry fire.
It was frequently taught as a trigger control exercise when I was in the service.
Get in a good prone firing position, have someone balance a dime on the barrel, then pull the trigger.

If the dime falls off, you are jerking it. If it stays on, you have a good trigger pull.

It works.

ETA - beat me to it
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:34:06 AM EDT
how many accidents happen because someone is dryfiring thinking it is unloaded. i treat all firearms as they are loaded. i do not dryfire in the house. save it for the range or a safe enviornment. .02
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:35:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:36:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:38:58 AM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By indianaman:
how many accidents happen because someone is dryfiring thinking it is unloaded. i treat all firearms as they are loaded. i do not dryfire in the house. save it for the range or a safe enviornment. .02



If you clear the weapon, lock the bolt to the rear, and visualize the empty chamber everytime you pick up the weapon AS YOU SHOULD,
there is no problem dry firing indoors.

If you do not do that, you are not safe at the range nor at your house.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:37:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:38:02 AM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.



nope. Works fine on my UGSI FNMI M16A2 barrel. AS well as my LE6920 and AR15 SBR barrel. They are all round, why the hell would it make any difference?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:39:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By indianaman:
how many accidents happen because someone is dryfiring thinking it is unloaded. i treat all firearms as they are loaded. i do not dryfire in the house. save it for the range or a safe enviornment. .02



If you clear the weapon, lock the bolt to the rear, and visualize the empty chamber everytime you pick up the weapon AS YOU SHOULD,
there is no problem dry firing indoors.




better safe than sorry. someone may accidently shoot big AL when they are watching scarface.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:40:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:41:52 AM EDT by TylerM_8]

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.




nope. Works fine on my UGSI FNMI M16A2 barrel. AS well as my LE6920 and AR15 SBR barrel. They are all round, why the hell would it make any difference?



I'm not positive that it is necessary to have an M16A1 style barrel. But the M16A1 barrel is the same thickness all the way down the barrel. The M16A2 style barrel is tapered with it being thin under the handguards and thicker in front of the front sight.

The difference is that the A1 is thinner where you place the dime than the A2 is.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:43:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:45:19 AM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By indianaman:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By indianaman:
how many accidents happen because someone is dryfiring thinking it is unloaded. i treat all firearms as they are loaded. i do not dryfire in the house. save it for the range or a safe enviornment. .02



If you clear the weapon, lock the bolt to the rear, and visualize the empty chamber everytime you pick up the weapon AS YOU SHOULD,
there is no problem dry firing indoors.




better safe than sorry. someone may accidently shoot big AL when they are watching scarface.



No, you should be aware of the exact status of your weapon everytime you pick it up. If you are unsure, you are not safe. The ONLY way to be 100% certain your Weapon is clear is to do the drill.
Lock the action open, check the chamber.

Yes, treat it as if it is loaded. That mean muzzle discipline. But to be afraid to dry fire your weapon anywhere but a range tells me you are not clearing your weapon as a matter of fact everytime you touch it.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:45:42 AM EDT
point taken
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:48:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/27/2006 11:58:48 AM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.




nope. Works fine on my UGSI FNMI M16A2 barrel. AS well as my LE6920 and AR15 SBR barrel. They are all round, why the hell would it make any difference?



I'm not positive that it is necessary to have an M16A1 style barrel. But the M16A1 barrel is the same thickness all the way down the barrel. The M16A2 style barrel is tapered with it being thin under the handguards and thicker in front of the front sight.

The difference is that the A1 is thinner where you place the dime than the A2 is.




WTF, you don't take off the handguards to do this drill.
The dime does not care what diameter the barrel is.
I have trained shooters hundreds of time on many different rifles using this drill.

I can balance a dime on an M16A1 barrel
I can balance a dime on and M16A2 Barrel
I can balance a dime on an AK47 barrel
I can balance a dime on a FAL and L1A1 barrel
I can balance a dime on a Garand Barrel
I can balance a dime on a round pencil
I can balance a dime on a piece of PVC pipe
I can balance a dime on anything cylindrical.

What difference does it make what diameter is it?
as long as the strength of the hammer alone does not knock off the dime, and there is 1 inch of exposed barrel, the exercise can be done.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:49:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:

Originally Posted By markm:

Originally Posted By VT4meGunCtrlisAntiUS:
I dryfire all of my weapons, sans the .22 rimfires.

--VT



Why no .22s?

I have an old MK I and a Ruger 10/22. Neither of which have a bolt holdback/slide stop. They've been dry fired hundreds and hundreds of times after the last round. No prob.



because the .22 is a rimfire and you can damage the firing pin against the barrel or gall the barrel to the point that it won't feed rounds.



True for some, not for others. When I was a kid, I had a Remington 540XR target rifle. Dry fired hundreds of times - no problem. I later was given a Remington 541-S sporter. Same basic action, but the firing pin on the 541-S will impact the back of the barrel. Oh well, it's just a little mark.


Link Posted: 2/27/2006 11:52:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By indianaman:
point taken



Make it a habit.
Non military people think I am strange. Every time I pick up ANY gun, be it a gun shop, at the range, from my gun safe. It gets racked open, chamber examined before doing anything. But it's the best way to ensure you don't get an AD/ND from an "unloaded weapon". It's a very good habit to develop.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:14:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By indianaman:
point takenhr


Make it a habit.
Non military people think I am strange. Every time I pick up ANY gun, be it a gun shop, at the range, from my gun safe. It gets racked open, chamber examined before doing anything. But it's the best way to ensure you don't get an AD/ND from an "unloaded weapon". It's a very good habit to develop.



+1

If I hand a weapon to someone, after I clear it first, and they don't clear it again I will ask for it back and put it up. I don't care if I've watched someone clear a weapon, if I am handling a firearm I check it, period.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:20:48 PM EDT
I dry fire my AR more than I actually get to fire live ammo. I always do this with no mags or ammo around, and I still keep in mind where the muzzle is pointed and I constantly check to make sure the chamber is clear.

My mailbox is about 100 yards from my front door and I can see it while sitting in my favorite chair. I have "shot" that mailbox hundreds of times.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:23:39 PM EDT
Sometimes the stupidity of the people on this site amazes me.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:33:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vanrichten:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By indianaman:
point taken



Make it a habit.
Non military people think I am strange. Every time I pick up ANY gun, be it a gun shop, at the range, from my gun safe. It gets racked open, chamber examined before doing anything. But it's the best way to ensure you don't get an AD/ND from an "unloaded weapon". It's a very good habit to develop.



+1

If I hand a weapon to someone, after I clear it first, and they don't clear it again I will ask for it back and put it up. I don't care if I've watched someone clear a weapon, if I am handling a firearm I check it, period.



I will only pass a firearm with the action open, that way I know I cleared the weapon, and the person Im giving the gun to knows its not a hot weapon instantly. I usually remind them to check the chamber anyways for good measure. While dry firng, I never have any ammo around me, and I usually lock the ammo up for that gun Im dry firing. Just remember to check the chamber and not relying on the action stripping the round out. I noticed one time while checking function on my 10/22 that the extractor didnt grab the round and remove it from the chamber when I was trying to clear the weapon. Good thing I looked inside and saw the brass there.

M4A1 try reading through the site a bit more and you will find all your questions answered many times. Ive been a lurker here since 2000, and havent posted till recently. Believe me theres alot of reading here to do.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 12:34:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By magnum_99:
Sometimes the stupidity of the people on this site amazes me.



me?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 6:24:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.




nope. Works fine on my UGSI FNMI M16A2 barrel. AS well as my LE6920 and AR15 SBR barrel. They are all round, why the hell would it make any difference?



I'm not positive that it is necessary to have an M16A1 style barrel. But the M16A1 barrel is the same thickness all the way down the barrel. The M16A2 style barrel is tapered with it being thin under the handguards and thicker in front of the front sight.

The difference is that the A1 is thinner where you place the dime than the A2 is.




WTF, you don't take off the handguards to do this drill.
The dime does not care what diameter the barrel is.
I have trained shooters hundreds of time on many different rifles using this drill.

I can balance a dime on an M16A1 barrel
I can balance a dime on and M16A2 Barrel
I can balance a dime on an AK47 barrel
I can balance a dime on a FAL and L1A1 barrel
I can balance a dime on a Garand Barrel
I can balance a dime on a round pencil
I can balance a dime on a piece of PVC pipe
I can balance a dime on anything cylindrical.

What difference does it make what diameter is it?
as long as the strength of the hammer alone does not knock off the dime, and there is 1 inch of exposed barrel, the exercise can be done.




Maybe I'm not doing it right then. Where exactly are you supposed to balance it, and how?
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 6:30:24 PM EDT
I dry fire the shit out of my rifle. My basement measure about 35 feet the long way, and I made a black dot on a white sheet of paper that is the same size as a std NRA bullseye scaled down to 10 meters (33 feet). I put on my shooting coat and dry fire all my shooting positions (standing, sitting, and prone), looking to break perfect shots.

Believe it or not, dry firing tons is one reason why my standing average is 193/200.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 6:37:59 PM EDT
Rule No. 1 treat every gun as if it loaded.

Point in safe direction and check to make sure it is empty. IMHO get snap cap. Tape mini target to wall and practice. learn trigger control. fix flinch. Call shot
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:54:41 AM EDT
If you are concerned about a negligent discharge while dryfiring, use your TV as a target. Not only does it have colorful moving targets that rapidly change, most picture-tube TVs make a good backstop. I've seen the picture tube in a 28" TV stop a 7.62x39 steel jacketed round. YMMV...
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 7:06:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By indianaman:

Originally Posted By magnum_99:
Sometimes the stupidity of the people on this site amazes me.



me?



I assume he directed that comment towards me since his comment was right under mine, but I really don't give a shit what he thinks. A weapon isn't going to mysteriously load itself, and like I said before I check the chamber then re-check it constantly. If somehow I did have a ND while doing this, the only thing damaged would be a mailbox. I never dry fire while my kid is running around, nor do I dry fire at anything I wouldn't want to destroy.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 8:17:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/28/2006 8:22:10 PM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By _DR:

What difference does it make what diameter is it?
as long as the strength of the hammer alone does not knock off the dime, and there is 1 inch of exposed barrel, the exercise can be done.




Maybe I'm not doing it right then. Where exactly are you supposed to balance it, and how?



Honestly is not difficult at all (obviously you have to have someone balance the dime for you after you are in firing position and aiming).

I don't see why you would have trouble balancing a dime on an M16A2 barrel, it it a bigger diameter than an M16A1 barrel. It's easier.

You made me break open my safe to prove my point. Have done this lilterally hundreds of times in BRM training. Great drill. With any rifle.

Link Posted: 2/28/2006 8:35:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By _DR:

What difference does it make what diameter is it?
as long as the strength of the hammer alone does not knock off the dime, and there is 1 inch of exposed barrel, the exercise can be done.




Maybe I'm not doing it right then. Where exactly are you supposed to balance it, and how?



Honestly is not difficult at all (obviously you have to have someone balance the dime for you after you are in firing position and aiming).

I don't see why you would have trouble balancing a dime on an M16A2 barrel, it it a bigger diameter than an M16A1 barrel. It's easier.
You made me break open my safe to prove my point. Have done this lilterally hundreds of times in BRM training. Great drill. With any rifle.

img.photobucket.com/albums/v408/darowden/dime100.jpg




This is exactly what I've been trying to say to you. I never said anything about placing the dime under the handguards.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 8:42:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By _DR:

What difference does it make what diameter is it?
as long as the strength of the hammer alone does not knock off the dime, and there is 1 inch of exposed barrel, the exercise can be done.




Maybe I'm not doing it right then. Where exactly are you supposed to balance it, and how?



Honestly is not difficult at all (obviously you have to have someone balance the dime for you after you are in firing position and aiming).

I don't see why you would have trouble balancing a dime on an M16A2 barrel, it it a bigger diameter than an M16A1 barrel. It's easier.
You made me break open my safe to prove my point. Have done this lilterally hundreds of times in BRM training. Great drill. With any rifle.

img.photobucket.com/albums/v408/darowden/dime100.jpg




This is exactly what I've been trying to say to you. I never said anything about placing the dime under the handguards.



So where is the problem?
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 8:51:29 PM EDT
For those who may be wondering, you can dry fire a ruger 10/22.
It won't hurt anything. As long as the firing pin doesn't extend past the bolt face (or a stop on the bolt face if the face doesn't contact the bolt), you won't hit the barrel with the firing pin.

The 10/22s' firing pin rides in the slot on top of the bolt, and the way it's designed, it CAN'T extend itself past the bolt face. Pull your bolt out and push on the pin. You'll see that it only moves a tiny bit.
Unless you have cut down the headspace WAY too much, you're good to go.

Dry-firing a 10/22 will not hurt a thing. If you don't believe me, go to rimfirecentral.com and do a search for "dryfire 1022" and see for yourself.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 9:50:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By indianaman:
point taken



Every time I pick up ANY gun, be it a gun shop, at the range, from my gun safe. It gets racked open, chamber examined before doing anything. But it's the best way to ensure you don't get an AD/ND from an "unloaded weapon". It's a very good habit to develop.



...Unless you happen to be handling very rare firearms. I got glared at HARD one day when I jerked open the action on a 2nd pattern FG42 that was in the collection of the Canadian War Museum. Those silly curators really prefer you don't move any parts that you don't have to.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 10:03:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:
No, you should be aware of the exact status of your weapon everytime you pick it up. If you are unsure, you are not safe. The ONLY way to be 100% certain your Weapon is clear is to do the drill.
Lock the action open, check the chamber.

Yes, treat it as if it is loaded. That mean muzzle discipline. But to be afraid to dry fire your weapon anywhere but a range tells me you are not clearing your weapon as a matter of fact everytime you touch it.




+1
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 12:25:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:
Yes, treat it as if it is loaded. That mean muzzle discipline. But to be afraid to dry fire your weapon anywhere but a range tells me you are not clearing your weapon as a matter of fact everytime you touch it.


I think the issue here is whether you dry-fire while pointed at something that won't stop a bullet. You know that it's safe because you checked the gun before you started. But if you treat it as loaded can you really pull the trigger with it pointed at a "soft" wall? When I dry-fire at home I'm aiming at a basement wall so if a shot were fired it would damage my wall but stop safely in the dirt outside. If I were upstairs though, the bullet would easily pass through the walls and off my property, possibly hitting a neighbor or passing vehicle. When I lived in an apartment I was very careful to hang my target so that there was a perpendicular wall behind the one I hung the target on so that a bullet would have to go through all of the studs in the length of that wall.

While giving out dry-fire exercises an instructor told me that most NDs happen when people are doing dry-fire drills with their carry weapon. It's easy to go "one more drill" after loading back up and all of a sudden they've shot their TV. He suggested saying, out loud, "the gun is loaded, the gun is loaded, the gun is loaded" to break the dry-fire mindset before holstering it.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 1:21:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.



nope. Works fine on my UGSI FNMI M16A2 barrel. AS well as my LE6920 and AR15 SBR barrel. They are all round, why the hell would it make any difference?



Could it be the diameter of the barrel, i.e. harder to balance on a smaller diameter than larger diameter. It would save the same purpose, but someone who practices on a small diameter would have a lighter trigger pull.

Just a thought
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 1:23:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By edwin247:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.



nope. Works fine on my UGSI FNMI M16A2 barrel. AS well as my LE6920 and AR15 SBR barrel. They are all round, why the hell would it make any difference?



Could it be the diameter of the barrel, i.e. harder to balance on a smaller diameter than larger diameter. It would save the same purpose, but someone who practices on a small diameter would have a lighter trigger pull.

Just a thought



THANK YOU. I was starting to wonder if I was the only one that thought this.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 1:29:42 PM EDT
Army Armors manual says to do it....so I do it...
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 5:06:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/1/2006 5:11:11 PM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By edwin247:

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By TylerM_8:

Originally Posted By M4A1OwnsYou:

Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Unless the actual M16 firing pins are made differently, it should cause no problem. Recruits dry fire hundreds or thousands of times during Basic Rifle Marksmanship. Even at the range, the people who aren't firing, will usually be doing some dime/washer drills. Put a dime on the barrel, and when you can pull the trigger without causing the dime to fall, put a cleaning rod down the barrel, and put the dime there. Teaches trigger control.



I could put a dime on the barrel, yank the trigger, and it won't fall...



I think the dime/washer drill only works with M16A1 style barrels. I tihnk there is some kind of modification when you do the drill on an M16A2 style barrel.



nope. Works fine on my UGSI FNMI M16A2 barrel. AS well as my LE6920 and AR15 SBR barrel. They are all round, why the hell would it make any difference?



Could it be the diameter of the barrel, i.e. harder to balance on a smaller diameter than larger diameter. It would save the same purpose, but someone who practices on a small diameter would have a lighter trigger pull.

Just a thought



THANK YOU. I was starting to wonder if I was the only one that thought this.



Holy shit you guys have never taught BRM, have you?!

You are analyzing this thing to death. With a standard military trigger I can pull the trigger on both and M16A1 an M16A2 without dislodging a balanced dime on the forward part of the barrel.
That indicates reasonable trigger squeeze in both cases.

Does the very slight difference in barrel diameter change the amount of force needed to dislodge the dime in a tiny way? Who cares! It still works. All the soldiers I trained who shot expert proves it.

I don't need to know anything else. It's a dry firing trigger control drill, not a science experiment.
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