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Posted: 1/9/2006 11:23:56 PM EDT
I took my gun apart to clean it the other day and noticed that the lug for the take down pin closest to the stock on my carbon fiber upper was broken. Their is a full crack in the bottom of it and also the stock side of it. I knew that it wasn't going to be as durable as metal when I got it, but it's only had about 300 rounds through it. Anyway, I'm thinking of how I can fix it. It looks like some sort of adhesive would be the easiest solution. What's the strongest glue for this type of material? Any other options for reparing this?

Thanks
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 11:32:54 PM EDT
300rds, I would send it back for rthem to fix it
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 11:43:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 11:44:20 PM EDT by brushdog]
Vulcan? Any pictures?

I wouldn't risk my fingers or eyes for a $90 part. Replace it or send it back.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 11:51:26 PM EDT
post a pic..
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:59:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MuRDoC:
300rds, I would send it back for them to fix it




+1
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:28:58 AM EDT
cyanoacrylic? or some solvent weld? dunno. i would send it back. 300rds is not acceptable.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:47:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MuRDoC:
300rds, I would send it back for rthem to fix replace it



Fixed it for ya
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:48:54 AM EDT
Bushy lower or Vulcan?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:53:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 10:28:51 AM EDT by AR_Clint]
I wanted a really light weight ar15. It was attached to a cav arms lower. I'm not sure what company made it. I would replace it, but I don't know which company made it. I know that the majority of firearms companies are really good with costumer service, but some don't back their products as much.






Here are some pictures of the entire upper. If you can identify it that would be helpfull.



Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:07:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AR_Clint:

Here are some pictures of the entire upper. If you can identify it that would be helpfull. Do you think the company would take it back even though I'm the second owner?



If it is Vulcan, you might not have to much luck with them. You could always give them a call and see what they say.


Based on the Magnuson-Moss Warranty act, Vulcan Arms Inc. offers no warranty on its product line. Vulcan Arms Inc. is extremely concerned with its customers' satisfaction and stands behind its products. Vulcan Arms Inc. has in the past and will continue to offer service on its products for a period of one year from the date of purchase by the original purchaser for defects in materials and workmanship. Please retain your sales receipt for proof of purchase date.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:10:48 AM EDT
I just took a look at the vulcan website and it by the looks of the brass deflector it's got to be one of theirs. Everyone kind of said "Is it Vulcan?" which makes me think this isn't all that uncommon, right? Does anyone know how their costumer service is?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:20:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AR_Clint:
I just took a look at the vulcan website and it by the looks of the brass deflector it's got to be one of theirs. Everyone kind of said "Is it Vulcan?" which makes me think this isn't all that uncommon, right? Does anyone know how their costumer service is?



I've read a couple of posts about their receivers cracking or barrel threads that looked like they melted. I've never even held one of their products, so I can't help you on wether or not they will help you. Give them a call and see if they will replace it without charging you for the replacement. I would also call up bushmaster and see if they can install your barrel on one of their uppers, if you still want the light weight.

I think holding your upper together with glue would be a grievous decision.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:35:21 AM EDT
I just emailed Vulcan and should be receiving a responce from them shortly. Thanks guys for the help. I'll let you know how this works out.

Clint
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:43:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 10:46:46 AM EDT by CBON15]
I have a Professional Ordnance type 97 carbine. I have had two "material" failures that have been fixed sucessfully. I suggest using some sort of metal "bridging" material, like steel wire in addition to using an adhesive like JB WELD. If it were me I would drill a hole, or holes, in each side of the break. Then glue in the steel reinforcing material, and glue the joint. My lower split along a mold mark down the top center of the ring into which the buffer is threaded. I made such a repair, and it has survived several thousand rounds thus far. Good Luck.

As an additional thought, not knowing exactly what upper you have. Some uppers and lowers do not have perfectly "standard" hole spacing. The Pro Ordnance uppers, for instance, will not mate with any other lower, as the hole spacing is different. Once you make the repair, check carefully to see that the spacing on the upper matches that of the lower. It may be that the fracture of your upper came about because the hole in the lower was offset slightly, and the pressure from the pin, if it was steel, may have been too much for the upper to bear.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:59:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 10:59:57 AM EDT by Hylton]
A Carbon Fiber Vulcan? ouch
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:04:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 11:04:31 AM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By AR_Clint:
I just emailed Vulcan and should be receiving a responce from them shortly. Thanks guys for the help. I'll let you know how this works out.

Clint



Good luck with that buddy, Vulcan Arms is not known for their helpful customer service, in fact they are quite infamous.

best of luck all the same.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:09:36 AM EDT
One of the first things I learned on this site was to avoid Hesse products at all costs. THos lowers will break at the barrel attachment point, I have seen pics of them blow out the sides of the upper etc. I suggest throwing it in the garbage as I would see it as dangerous to use.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:28:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DevL:
One of the first things I learned on this site was to avoid Hesse products at all costs. THos lowers will break at the barrel attachment point, I have seen pics of them blow out the sides of the upper etc. I suggest throwing it in the garbage as I would see it as dangerous to use.



you mean like this Vulcan upper?



Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:48:08 AM EDT
Yes. I would think that pic alone would tell people to avoid that receiver. A local AR15.com member had his barrel go loose and would wobble around in the reciever in a circle with the barrel nut tightened down. We should get a tacked thread going with pics of Vulcan receiver failures to let people know to avoid them.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:50:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DevL:
Yes. I would think that pic alone would tell people to avoid that receiver. A local AR15.com member had his barrel go loose and would wobble around in the reciever in a circle with the barrel nut tightened down. We should get a tacked thread going with pics of Vulcan receiver failures to let people know to avoid them.




BIG+1

Link Posted: 1/10/2006 12:01:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LWRC_Matt:
cyanoacrylic cyanoacrylate? or some solvent weld? dunno. i would send it back. 300rds is not acceptable.



Just in case he wanted to try it but I would advise AGAINST it.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 12:03:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By _DR:

Originally Posted By AR_Clint:
I just emailed Vulcan and should be receiving a responce from them shortly. Thanks guys for the help. I'll let you know how this works out.

Clint



Good luck with that buddy, Vulcan Arms is not known for their helpful customer service, in fact they are quite infamous.

best of luck all the same.



But according to their add, they supply special forces around the world!!
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 12:05:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 12:05:46 PM EDT by demigod]
Originally Posted By _DR:

That's funny, _DR!!

http://tinypic.com/k19x5z.jpg

here
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 12:05:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JosephR:

Originally Posted By LWRC_Matt:
cyanoacrylic cyanoacrylate? or some solvent weld? dunno. i would send it back. 300rds is not acceptable.



Just in case he wanted to try it but I would advise AGAINST it.



Does this mean you are suggesting superglueing the receiver back together?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 12:07:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By demigod:
Originally Posted By _DR:

That's funny, _DR!!

tinypic.com/k19x5z.jpg

A vulcan/Oly blend! Could there be a worse piece of junk in the universe?



Easy there! I have Colts, BMs and DPMSs in the stable, but my Oly has never failed me either!
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 12:27:01 PM EDT
WOW!!! After looking at that picture maybe I'll just look into getting a Bushmaster carbon upper receiver.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 12:36:40 PM EDT
There is not much wait savings between a carbon fiber and forged aluminum upper.....
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 2:51:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR_Clint:
WOW!!! After looking at that picture maybe I'll just look into getting a Bushmaster carbon upper receiver.



Still more likely to fracture at that particular point than a forged Aluminum upper. Carbon fiber has it's limitations, and these uppers are not pure CF but rather a mixture of poymer and Carbon fibers.

Extremely minor weight savings. Not worth it IMO. Your results may vary.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:04:56 PM EDT
What’s this with you and Carbon Fiber man? Haven’t you learned your lesson yet?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:17:52 PM EDT
carbon is for gunpowder not uppers.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:36:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR_Clint:
I just emailed Vulcan and should be receiving a responce from them shortly. Thanks guys for the help. I'll let you know how this works out.

Clint


Just let the pros repair/ replace it for you.

Nothing personal against carbon fiber owners here but I still don't trust the technology the manufacturers are currently using.

The manufacturers should use stronger composites or metals like titanium or stainless steel in high stress areas.

Carbon fiber barrels, handguards and stocks are OK but the receivers still have a long way to go. This is just my personal opinion, YMMV.

I'm an aircraft composites tool and manufacturing engineer with 20 years experience, I know nothing.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 3:47:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 5:48:02 PM EDT by JosephR]

Originally Posted By DevL:

Originally Posted By JosephR:

Originally Posted By LWRC_Matt:
cyanoacrylic cyanoacrylate? or some solvent weld? dunno. i would send it back. 300rds is not acceptable.



Just in case he wanted to try it but I would advise AGAINST it.



Does this mean you are suggesting superglueing the receiver back together?



Dude, do you hit QUOTE as soon as the CA registered in your brain? No offense meant as I'm sure you just had a little too much caffeine but you needed to finish reading my sentence. I'm usually a little long-winded (like now) but not there.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:07:55 PM EDT
Honestly I would send it back or replace it with an aluminum one. It isn't worth your safety over it.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:21:02 PM EDT
From what I've heard about Hesee/Vulcan, you would probably be better off if it didn't come directly from them. Usually a vendor would be willing to risk taking a loss to keep you happy even if Hesse/Vulcan won't.

Hopefully you bought it from a third party vendor and they'll take care of it for you!
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 8:17:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:50:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DevL:
Yes. I would think that pic alone would tell people to avoid that receiver. A local AR15.com member had his barrel go loose and would wobble around in the reciever in a circle with the barrel nut tightened down. We should get a tacked thread going with pics of Vulcan receiver failures to let people know to avoid them.



+2
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:27:02 PM EDT
Once again....

The AR15 was designed and engineered to be made of ALUMINUM.

Not steel, not carbon fiber, not pie crust.

If someone were to design and engineer an AR15 to be made of steel or carbon fiber it would be made to take advantage of the STRENGTHS of the material and would be engineered to compensate for the WEAKNESSES of the material.

An AR15 made of steel or carbon fiber would not have to LOOK like an AR15 made of aluminum.
It might be thinner in some areas and thicker on others.

In the case of carbon fiber there are certain area that should be made of aluminum or at least renforced with aluminum in the matrix.
These include the barrel nut threads and the lugs for the pivot and take-down pins on the upper.

I'll stick with AR15 lowers and uppers being made of aluminum, just like Eugene Stoner designed.
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