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Posted: 1/9/2006 6:55:02 PM EDT
Like the title says, I'm curious if this is a normal occurence.

When I chamber a round and then remove it there is a small dimple in the primer.

Should there be that much "play" in the firing pin?

I just want to know if this could lead to slam fires as the rifle wears.

Thanks
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:57:07 PM EDT
yes--its normal
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:57:24 PM EDT
Yes, thats normal... Its caused by the free floating firing pin...
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 8:02:12 PM EDT
Yes its normal but if you keep on re chambering the same round at some point you could get an unintentional discharge.The topic of this happening came up last year when a soldier in Iraq had it happen to him from chambering the same round over and over.I didnt refer to it as negligent because its only negligent if you know it can happen and continue to do it.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:02:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ALPHAGHOST:
yes--its normal



+1
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:39:25 AM EDT
If you switch to a titanium firing pin it'll stop doing that. It lighter.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:02:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By neverenough:
If you switch to a titanium firing pin it'll stop doing that. It lighter.



Total waste of money.... titanium firing pins are used in some rifles to reduce lock time. They don't contribute to accuracy or reduction in lock time significantly in an AR (Lightened hammer is another story, but different thread).

Don't spend money to fix something that is perfectly normal
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:22:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 200-10x:

Originally Posted By neverenough:
If you switch to a titanium firing pin it'll stop doing that. It lighter.



Total waste of money.... titanium firing pins are used in some rifles to reduce lock time. They don't contribute to accuracy or reduction in lock time significantly in an AR (Lightened hammer is another story, but different thread).

Don't spend money to fix something that is perfectly normal


If you reload your own ammo using standard rifle primers rather than the harder military-type primers, the Ti pins will eliminate slam fires. The Ti pins are a piece of harden Ti and is just as strong as its steel counterpart at 1/3d the weight.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 10:59:10 PM EDT
They also break a lot. Whether it's by material, or by manufacture, I don't trust them. I do like the principle, though.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:20:59 PM EDT
I do not recall having chambered a round I didn't fire. In the short time between chambering and firing if there is an unseen dimple in there, its not causing any problems. Eventually, someone will have a slam fire due to a bad primer. I am sure when the eventual slamfire does occur, it will get its own thread.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 5:07:52 AM EDT
The question if it was normal was answered. The point I was making is that titanium firing pins don't cause the dimple in the primers. Total waste of money? Last I looked it was MY money and I'll spend it as I chose.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 6:31:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:If you reload your own ammo using standard rifle primers rather than the harder military-type primers, the Ti pins will eliminate slam fires.


I've shot nearly 5000 rounds through my NM AR. Almost exactly half of them were in slow fire, which means dropping a round in the chamber then letting the bolt slam home behind it. None of those rounds have had milspec primers in them, and I have yet to get a slamfire.

If one is so concerned about handloads, just uniform the primer pocket to SAAMI depth and seat properly. Chance of slamfire = 0.

IMO, the Ti pin is a solution looking for a probelm.
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