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Posted: 12/29/2005 8:07:28 PM EDT
Anyone try it. They're really strong magnets if you never heard of such. I don't like too much stuff on my rifle, and was thinking of rigging up some magnets. Would they affect the batteries? I have a Surefire G2.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:47:33 PM EDT
My first reaction, no way man. They are strong, thats for sure, but I dont think it'll be strong enough to trust. And if you get a mag strong enought to hold it on when you want it on, it wont be QD, itll be a pain in the ass to get off. My .02 I have never tried it so dont think anything of my thoughts.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 3:12:27 AM EDT
Uh, guys. Not sure just how good this would work. I'm not sure about the specific type of magnet you are talking about, but to the best of my knowledge, all magnets only work on ferrous metals (iron, steel, etc.). Most rails, AR uppers and scope/sight bases are aluminum and that is not on my list of ferrous metals .

There is still double sided sticky tape and just plain duct tape.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 3:18:31 AM EDT
Magnets are a good idea but one problem you'd run into is the fact that a magnet has a lot of sticking power, but only friction will keep the item from rotating or otherwise shifting around. Additionally, as mentioned above, you'd need ferrous anchor points for the magnets, whether they are on the rifle or accessory, that would add weight and parts.

Other than that, the only other problem would be things sticking to your magnets that you didn't want to; belt buckles, sling adjusters, snaps on your gear, etc.

Link Posted: 12/30/2005 3:30:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ratgravy:
Anyone try it. They're really strong magnets if you never heard of such. I don't like too much stuff on my rifle, and was thinking of rigging up some magnets. Would they affect the batteries? I have a Surefire G2.



+1 for "thinking outside the box"

The problem is, IMO, that a magnet-based mount system seems to offer no advantage over the variety of conventional QD mounts that are available.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 4:07:44 AM EDT
magnets stick to aluminum?


think they would shift and wouldnt the poles on the magnet cause it to be troublesome to remove and install in the same spot?
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 4:15:13 AM EDT
...I'd be pissed at the magnets attaching themselves to anything not intended. Car keys, tire irons, loose nuts and bolts, etc.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 4:21:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2005 7:46:16 AM EDT by curt]
I don't think it would affect the batteries, i wouldn't think that stuff sticking to the magnets would be a big problem as long as it was attached to a piece of ferrous metal (barrel), THAT problem would occur when it was removed IF you put the magnets on the light and not on the HG.

I would say try it out! It's a cheap experiment and it may be that you discover something.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 4:42:42 AM EDT
Magnets are now being used on high end lawn mowers to hold the bed knife onto the frame.

They make quick adjustments and grinding easier in the golf course industry.



more info

These mowers have to be precisely adjusted to the thousanth. We often mow at .120 and can change to up to .150

Link Posted: 12/30/2005 8:23:02 AM EDT
I would hate to be carrying a magnetically mounted accessory and try to land nav at the same time with a compass.

The rifle barrel alone can jack your compass, a crazy ninja magnet would make it impossible.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 8:57:11 AM EDT
I can't find my magnets but when i find them i'm going to do it. heres how. Tne magnets are about the thickness of a nickel and about 3/4" round. I figure 4 or 6 each depending, lets say 6. i'll line them up 2x2x2side by side, then use JBweld or maybe some marine grade silicon, glue them to my sure fire then let that set. Later glue them in position on the rifles free float handgauard. After that is cured, cut to size a piece of bicycle inner tube to use as a cushion between the magnets because the magnets snap together so hard they sometimes shatter. I'd rather not use a rail and ring, the profile gets too high and i would probably only mount it if i heard something lurking at night.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 11:58:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2005 11:58:40 AM EDT by advntrjnky]
i was thinking that if you made dedicated two piece mounts that took 4 magnets it might work. 2 perm on the rifle two on the quick detach. if you had a recoil slot and groove (like the pic rail grove) to keep it aligned and from slipping under recoil it might work with some of the new high strength magnets. i like the idea(might or might not work), but defiantely not a cheap alternative if made well.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 5:09:36 PM EDT
Found the magnets, and project is underway. I'm getting some good ideas as i go but will just stick with the general plan for now. I started with JB weldbut scrapped that when i noticed jb is apparently ferrous. stuff started polarizing.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 5:20:18 PM EDT
I would be concerned that some metallic debris could get attached to the magnets and interfere with the bond and/or cause a shift in alignment.

It can be tough to keep that junk from getting stuck to the magnets and even harder to get it off when it does.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 5:29:00 PM EDT
It was tried once back in '89 at the Aberdeen proving grounds. Worked well, except when firing ss109 at angles greater than 90 degrees. The steel penetrator core caused the bullet to come back at the shooter and caused grievous wounds.

<­BR>

Link Posted: 12/30/2005 5:37:48 PM EDT
I'm still waiting for the "Eureka, they don't stick to aluminum!"

But, there's always, duct tape and super glue.

Link Posted: 12/30/2005 5:40:22 PM EDT
I've played with the neo magnets. They are very strong in pulling/holding power.
They are a pressed metal powder that has a coating of nickel, black nickel, gold or ceramic.

They are extremely brittle, and will chip easily by letting them slam into each other.
Once the outer coating is chipped, it exposes the pressed metal underneath.
The metal is IRON and it will rust very easily in it's unprotected state.

I have one stuck on my shift lever in my truck that I keep my Zippo on, and it has scratched the paint off of the lever and has rusted both the lever and the magnet.

Because of the chipping and rust issues, I wouldn't use this set-up on my rifles.

RARE EARTH MAGNETS
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 6:00:32 PM EDT
I am a network administrator, and whenever we have an old hard drive go bad, I always rip it open and take the magnets out. These things are so strong that once you stick them to the refrigerator, the only way to get them off is to slide them to the edge.

I think it would work if he attaches something to the light as well (another magnet). But I could see stuff getting stuck to them causing problems.

Link Posted: 12/30/2005 6:32:37 PM EDT
It would work funny when you waved your muzzle past a metal doorframe and got stuck to it.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 6:55:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Big-FED:
I'm still waiting for the "Eureka, they don't stick to aluminum!"

But, there's always, duct tape and super glue.



+1

I'm wondering why this thread has lasted more than three posts.
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 7:05:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/30/2005 7:06:26 PM EDT by mfingar]
Beware!
Magnets make M855 rounds tumble.





Link Posted: 12/30/2005 7:24:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:

Originally Posted By Big-FED:
I'm still waiting for the "Eureka, they don't stick to aluminum!"

But, there's always, duct tape and super glue.



+1

I'm wondering why this thread has lasted more than three posts.



Maybe because the guys with the idea are a little denser than the magnets?
Link Posted: 12/30/2005 7:31:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mfingar:
...I'd be pissed at the magnets attaching themselves to anything not intended. Car keys, tire irons, loose nuts and bolts, etc.



lol! I'm thinking the steel gates that permit entry into every courtyard, almost, in the middle east. Wouldn't that be a bitch!
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 7:28:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Big-FED:

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:

Originally Posted By Big-FED:
I'm still waiting for the "Eureka, they don't stick to aluminum!"

But, there's always, duct tape and super glue.



+1

I'm wondering why this thread has lasted more than three posts.



Maybe because the guys with the idea are a little denser than the magnets?



and who said that you would have to have a magnet on the item you're trying to attach to an aluminum item... hmmm probably some dense SOB.
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 7:44:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By curt:

Originally Posted By Big-FED:

Originally Posted By SWO_daddy:

Originally Posted By Big-FED:
I'm still waiting for the "Eureka, they don't stick to aluminum!"

But, there's always, duct tape and super glue.



+1

I'm wondering why this thread has lasted more than three posts.



Maybe because the guys with the idea are a little denser than the magnets?



and who said that you would have to have a magnet on the item you're trying to attach to an aluminum item... hmmm probably some dense SOB.


Did you read the first post?

Link Posted: 12/31/2005 8:09:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/31/2005 8:11:11 AM EDT by Gunzilla]
I did not read this entire thread, so this may have been mentioned already -- my father also worked with weapons design some and made a magnetic scope mount in the 50s, the method he used to ensure concetric and repeatable mounting was to have a stud on one half that fit into a hole in the magent on the other half...

They were hell for stout, I believe there are a few still around, but the issue (then) was how expensive they were to make. As you know, you can not machine a magnet, so the surface and hole had to be ground, then the studs were ground to near zero fit.

The down side was that they messed with a compass like crazy and may have been too good of a hold -- if the operator was injured or the device you are trying to get off was slippery, it may not be coming off.

I just got back from the folks house, but I can ask dad if he still has one around and get you some pictures if it helps?
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 8:34:46 AM EDT
I did it. I used 2x2 magnets with a little permatex, that's all i had lying around, but looks to be plenty strong enough. The magnets are almost the exact size of a nickle, slighly thicker. Magnet strengh is more than strong enough, and the poles line up exactly the same every time. And strong enough to operate the swicthes and such. I removed the plating off of the magnets and sprayed them with moly, it won't protect them from corrosion but i'm not worried about that right now. So basically all i have is 2 grey nickle looking magnets forward and left on ff tube. If it holds under recoil (i think it will) i can't see any downfall other than stuff sticking to the magnets. I Might fabricate an iron rail under ff tube to eliminate magnets on the rifle...in the future. If i shoot today i'll post the results...
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 11:31:45 AM EDT
cool! glad you got a prototype working. let's see some pics.
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 3:24:33 PM EDT
I suppose you will be using magnets so strong that the accessories you are mounting with them aren't going to get yanked off when snagged so my question is, how are you going to remove them by hand? I'm picturing magnets strong enough to hold a flashlight while it is snagged or bumped into a corner of a wall while you are running. Wouldn't as strong enough magnetic grip be too strong for you to remove?

You are going to reach into your range back and find that every one of your accessories has decided to become part of some big orgy that you can't make heads or tails of...
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