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Posted: 12/28/2005 10:09:35 PM EDT
I want to mark specific elevation lines on my scope so I can dial in the right adjustment for the distance...but i don't have a range to shoot at right now beyond 200 yards...so are there charts anywhere that would tell me the number of elevation clicks to zero in at 100 200 300 400 yards etc.? thanks for any info.
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 10:19:38 PM EDT
The back of any reloading guide gives you ballistics on yardage, but thats only a guide, only way is to live fire that I know of
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 10:39:41 PM EDT
If you get good (by good I mean above average) ballistics software, it'll do it for you. I like the software from HorusVision and actually on the cheap, Sierra's isn't bad either. From there the sky's the limit.

SPC Richard A. White, Senior Medic
249th MP Detachment (EACF)
Camp Humphreys, ROK
Link Posted: 12/28/2005 10:41:46 PM EDT
Almost every ammunition manufacturer has a table that shows how much almost any given round will drop.

This, for instance, is from Remington:
Remington's Ballistic Chart For Remington.223 Ammunition

Figure out where YOUR zero is and adjust your scope from there.

For instance this from that Remington page:

Premier® AccuTip™ 55 * * 1.5 * * 1.4 * * zero * * -2.8 * * -7.1 * * -21.7 * * -46.3

Zeroed at 200 yards, 1.5 High at 100 yards, 1.4 inches high at 150, zero at 200, 2.8 inches lower at 250 yards, 7.1 inches lower at 300 yards, 21.7 inches lower at 400 yards and 46.3 inches lower at 500 yards.

Some other companies go out further.

Just remember that ¼ inch click at 100 is ½ inch click at 200 yards, 3/4 of an inch at 300, a full inch at 400 and 1¼ inches at 500.

I often shoot at 600 yards.
That means that I have a 1½ inch adjustment for each of the dials.

Of course you can always try to find a BDC, or Bullet Drop Compensator. Some Scope manufacturers have them as an extra option.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 6:47:51 AM EDT
Tell me the exact ammo you plan on using (if it's your own reloads I need to know the exact bullet type and the muzzle velocity) and I will run it through a Sierra Bullets Infinity ballistics program.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 1:11:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/29/2005 1:32:00 PM EDT by DaveM4P99]
wow thanks for all the info guys...i think i will start looking into all that,

i just bought 500 rounds of federal 62 grain so thats what i will be using for a while now.

www.sportsmansguide.com/cb/cb.asp?a=163180

Link Posted: 12/29/2005 3:14:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DaveM4P99:
wow thanks for all the info guys...i think i will start looking into all that,

i just bought 500 rounds of federal 62 grain so thats what i will be using for a while now.

www.sportsmansguide.com/cb/cb.asp?a=163180




I wish 500 rnds would last me " a while"...
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 3:24:16 PM EDT
Download "Point Blank" software from Steves Reloading Pages. Search Google for this site. The software is free and works very well. You do have to know the velocity of the round, but you can get a good guess from a reloading manual. The software will even plot a graph, and you can print a bullet drop chart.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 3:41:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Spectre1:

Originally Posted By DaveM4P99:
wow thanks for all the info guys...i think i will start looking into all that,

i just bought 500 rounds of federal 62 grain so thats what i will be using for a while now.

www.sportsmansguide.com/cb/cb.asp?a=163180




I wish 500 rnds would last me " a while"...




haha well yeah me too...i meant that since i found the deal i will be ordering that from now on. but thanks for all the info everyone.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 3:56:34 PM EDT
You can never get the correct "dope" by going from a chart. Every rifle will be different at different elevations and with different ammo.
You can approximations, but you will have to shoot your rifle to get your come ups.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 7:51:55 PM EDT
Dave: Glad you got a chuckle out of that!

I guess you'd asked a question for a reason, to get answers, not laughs.

So here's an answer for you. I used to do quite a bit of distance shooting, nothing too extreme, usually a max of 600 meters. Bolt guns and optics, sometimes with bipods, often with a rest of some sort. As many others before have said, charts and software are nice, and can be helpful to a certain degree, but they are no substitute for live fire.

Every weapon is an individual with its own like, dislikes, and quirks, sort of like ARFCOMers!


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